RN "Super Union" - page 9

by laborer 11,315 Views | 87 Comments

:dance::dance::dance: MASSACHUSETTS NURSE ASSOCIATION VOTES TO JOIN.......... :loveya::loveya::loveya:... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Onekidneynurse
    As I said witnessing a consent and explaining it to the patient are 2 very different things. I am not operating on the patient I am not explaining the risks or procedure. EVER.

    What happens when you go home and the surgeon never came in to talk with that patient. Where would your liability be with that scenario. You go right ahead and get consents for surgery signed. I won't be doing that.

    Who assesses the interpreter? Do you have staff who speak both languages so they can assess the medical knowledge of the interpreter. Often it's just someone who's been in the US for a couple of years. NO medical knowledge at all.
    The surgeon has already talked with the patient and has verbap consent. Then he or she askd the secretary to type it (yes on a three copy form). A nurse then WITNESSES the signing of the consent.

    I already stated that I do not witness a consent if the patient has questions. And that I call the doctor to come and answer the patients questions. PLEASE don't assume that I explain the risks or the procedure to the patient. I have typed that I do not multiple times.

    Our union and the union representing non RN staff have worked out with the hospital that the interpreter is a licensed healthcare provider. RN, LVN, RT, pharmacist, MD, DO, etcetra. We have a very diverse staff. Many speak more than one language. Generally in critical care a nurse already on the unit can speak Spanish, Korean, Armenian, or other language. That RN will be assigned to the appropriate patient so there is no need for a translator. When the surgeon or anyone else talks with that patient the RN/translator translates.

    Do you ask your patient if they understand what they are signing? Or just ask if it is their signature?
    What are the qualifications of your interpreters?
    Last edit by herring_RN on Jan 4, '10
  2. 0
    Quote from herring_RN
    I already stated that I do not witness a consent if the patient has questions. And that I call the doctor to come and answer the patients questions. PLEASE don't assume that I explain the risks or the procesure to the patient. I have typed that I do not multiple times.

    Our union and the union representing non RN staff have worked out with the hospital that the interpreter is a licensed healthcare provider. RN, LVN, RT, pharmacist, MD, DO, etcetra. We have a very diverse staff. Many speak more than one language. Generally in critical care a nurse already on the unit can speak Spanish, Korean, Armenian, or other language. That rN will be assigned to the appropriate patient so there is no need for a translator.

    Do you ask your patient is thy understand what they are signing? Or just ask if it is their signature?
    What are the qualifications of your interpreters?
    You said in post no. 78 " Working nights there is often a doctors order to get a consent. If the patient has any questions or misunderstandings I contact the doctor to come in to talk to the patient" Now if you haven't gone over the consent how does the patient know to ask questions. What do you mean by "get a conset" See you're even confusing me. So how can you expect a patient to understand you.

    As I said before many of the interpretors have no medical knowledge. If an interpretor is explaining a surgical consent shouldn't the interpretor be a surgeon? I do ask them if it's their signature. It's not my place to explain surgery. I'm not a surgeon. I won't be doing the surgery.
  3. 2
    When there is a written order to prepare a consent and have the patient sign it I ask my patient if he or she has questions.

    If there are questions I ensure that the surgeon comes to the bedside to discuss it with the patient.

    In the event that the patient does not speak English and the surgeon does not speak the patients language I call a translator who has passed the fluency test in English and the patients language. This person is a healthcare professional. The SURGEON needs a translator to answer the patients questions.

    Sorry that it is so confusing to you. This is how it is done at most hospitals where I have worked. And I've worked registry on and off at a variety of hospitals for forty years.

    Wherever you work must have very different policies and procedures. I am glad our contract includes the requirement that the hospital provide RNs orientation to all policies and procedues as well as monthly updates when there is a change.
    Last edit by herring_RN on Jan 1, '10
    lindarn and laborer like this.
  4. 3
    I am very familiar with the practice of the RN obtaining the signed consent for a medical procedure. The surgeon absolutely explains the surgery, risks, etc and answers all questions. The nurse is frequently present during this interaction. The patient verbalizes understanding and agrees to the procedure. The RN reviews the legal consent with the patient and witnesses his/her signature. If the patient has any further questions or concerns the surgeon is recalled to the unit with the consent now his/her responsibility. If a translater was required it was provided by the hospital, ALWAYS someone who was specifically trained to provide medical translation. This happened in the PICU and L&D frequently.
    wondern, herring_RN, and laborer like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from tewdles
    I am very familiar with the practice of the RN obtaining the signed consent for a medical procedure. The surgeon absolutely explains the surgery, risks, etc and answers all questions. The nurse is frequently present during this interaction. The patient verbalizes understanding and agrees to the procedure. The RN reviews the legal consent with the patient and witnesses his/her signature. If the patient has any further questions or concerns the surgeon is recalled to the unit with the consent now his/her responsibility. If a translater was required it was provided by the hospital, ALWAYS someone who was specifically trained to provide medical translation. This happened in the PICU and L&D frequently.
    I worked Surgical for 15 years. And as both you and I have said the surgeon goes over the consent not the nurse. That's been my contention here all along. I don't let the surgeon go without the patient answering the questions.
  6. 1
    Quote from Onekidneynurse
    I worked Surgical for 15 years. And as both you and I have said the surgeon goes over the consent not the nurse. That's been my contention here all along. I don't let the surgeon go without the patient answering the questions.
    Do you mean you make the patient answer questions?
    laborer likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from herring_RN
    Do you mean you make the patient answer questions?
    Yes sometimes patients do answer questions. Like do you have any questions, do you understand ? I would hope they would answer those questions.......

    In this instance I did mean ask questions. I still don't get a consent for a surgical patient. I will WITNESS the signature but I don't explain the procedures.
    wondern likes this.
  8. 2
    Quote from Onekidneynurse
    Yes sometimes patients do answer questions. Like do you have any questions, do you understand ? I would hope they would answer those questions.......

    In this instance I did mean ask questions. I still don't get a consent for a surgical patient. I will WITNESS the signature but I don't explain the procedures.
    Me too. We agree.
    wondern and laborer like this.


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