The life cycle of a CNA forum member - page 7

So a lot of the posts on here can get a little... predictable. From now on just use this handy guide to find out how many more threads to expect from any given member before getting to the good... Read More

  1. Visit  yousoldtheworld profile page
    0
    Quote from LaterAlligator
    I'm baffled by those that give up highly-paid jobs to come work as a CNA as well. If I could afford it, I'd go to school full-time to be an RN rather than keep working in LTC and go to school part-time. Much as I love my residents and even my facility, I'd be outta there and on campus in a HEARTBEAT if I had the cash!
    Haha...I was never high paid before, BUT I took a $4/hour paycut when I left the last geriatric facility to work at my current special needs facility. That probably makes me somewhat crazy, but I don't regret it...except when I;m paying my bills each month, yikes.
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  3. Visit  pca_85 profile page
    0
    I so adore this thread
  4. Visit  student forever profile page
    0
    hysterical becuase sooooooooooooo true!!! guilty as charged!
  5. Visit  tigerkate profile page
    0
    Just re-read the steps.
    Definitely passed all of them now... But I do have to say, having my first job in a hospital-- I wasn't looking exclusively at hospitals, it was the only place that replied to me and had me interview (shocking!). And the last steps are the exact same-- miserable for a month or two, worried about getting fired (being told no one gets fired unless they eff up time cards on purpose), upset about understaffing, complaining about a few RN's being mean or lazy.
    And only being able to constantly complain about patients when they stay on unit for more than 2 weeks. :P

    Mostly just try to suck it up now.
    And evolving into the part where I want to start taking classes at community college to get my RN, but also lacking any energy or driving motivation to get started on it.
  6. Visit  SugarBabe99 profile page
    2
    Quote from chi449rk
    When I've managed people in the past, the #1 reason for letting someone go was attendance. If you're hired to work 3-11 and you say that's okay, don't come in two weeks later and ask to be moved to day shifts. How about I move you out the door?

    The #2 reason for getting rid of someone was performance. Every job has a training period, manuals, resources to help employees understand the expectations of the job. If you've been trained and you've indicated that you know what you're doing, then I'm going to assume you do. And when it becomes clear that they didn't bother to retain the training, they say it was too hard or there was too much to remember. Bye bye.
    ... so let me get this straight. You fire someone just for ASKING if they can possibly be moved to a different shift? I mean, I'm sorry but that seems unusually harsh to me. Maybe they have extenuating circumstances or something comes up that would make working a particular shift difficult. I mean, if it was me, I wouldn't fire them just for ASKING if they could be moved to a different shift; if they absolutely refused to work the shift they were assigned to or didn't show up for it, then sure, but not just for asking.

    Also, as far as #2 goes... it takes TIME and PRACTICE to learn how to do things right, not everyone is a genius or has a photographic memory. To fire someone just for needing time to learn things and not knowing how to do everything perfectly during the first few days seems excessive.
    DarkBluePhoenix and fuzzywuzzy like this.
  7. Visit  IEDave profile page
    0
    Quote from SugarBabe99
    ... so let me get this straight. You fire someone just for ASKING if they can possibly be moved to a different shift? I mean, I'm sorry but that seems unusually harsh to me. Maybe they have extenuating circumstances or something comes up that would make working a particular shift difficult. I mean, if it was me, I wouldn't fire them just for ASKING if they could be moved to a different shift; if they absolutely refused to work the shift they were assigned to or didn't show up for it, then sure, but not just for asking.

    Also, as far as #2 goes... it takes TIME and PRACTICE to learn how to do things right, not everyone is a genius or has a photographic memory. To fire someone just for needing time to learn things and not knowing how to do everything perfectly during the first few days seems excessive.
    Not to put words in 'chi449rk's mouth, but for the most part he's correct - here's why I think so.
    When you agree to work for a company, you're agreeing to abide by a specific set of conditions which are outlined (usually) on your offer letter. If there are potential problems with scheduling, etc. the time to discusss them is during the negotiation phase, NOT after you've accepted the position. At that point, you're under the terms of a legally binding contract. It may sound harsh, and most managers I've known (the good ones, anyway) will do what they can to accomodate unexpected circumstances - but, if you're bouncing your schedule all over creation you're at the very least not creating a favorable impression of yourself, and at worst can be held accountable for violation of contract. As far as asking for a shift change - I suspect the point was more about asking for a shift change "after 2 weeks", which unless you've got a VERY good reason would, in my opinion, be really pushing it.

    As far as #2 - again, not to put words in anyone's mouth, but anyplace I've ever worked you're under a probationary period from the date of hire until what ever time was specified on the offer letter - usually 90 days, but in civil service it can go for up to a year. During your probationary period you're expected to prove you can do the job - if you can't cut the mustard in, say 3 months (typical probation period for an entry-level position - which works out to 520 hours) my take is you shouldn't be there at all. No place is going to boot you without giving you a fair chance (and for good reason - you can sue 'em for their eyeteeth if they don't), but you aren't going to be able to spend eternity trying to demonstrate you're a capable employee. And, let's face it - CNA isn't exactly rocket science here; you're most likely taught just enough so that you're not a danger to patients or yourself, and then turned loose. How well you do is up to you.

    Feel free to flame me to a crisp, but that's my take on the situation. Just my .
  8. Visit  IEDave profile page
    0
    And, thanks to all for the good laugh - I'll try and hit all of 'em, but being male the "8 months pregnant" part may be a bit tough to pull off.
    Just hope the local cops don't show up - it's just after 4 a.m. local time, and my laughter does tend to carry a bit.

    ----- Dave
  9. Visit  SugarBabe99 profile page
    0
    Quote from IEDave
    As far as #2 - again, not to put words in anyone's mouth, but anyplace I've ever worked you're under a probationary period from the date of hire until what ever time was specified on the offer letter - usually 90 days, but in civil service it can go for up to a year. During your probationary period you're expected to prove you can do the job - if you can't cut the mustard in, say 3 months (typical probation period for an entry-level position - which works out to 520 hours) my take is you shouldn't be there at all. No place is going to boot you without giving you a fair chance (and for good reason - you can sue 'em for their eyeteeth if they don't), but you aren't going to be able to spend eternity trying to demonstrate you're a capable employee. And, let's face it - CNA isn't exactly rocket science here; you're most likely taught just enough so that you're not a danger to patients or yourself, and then turned loose. How well you do is up to you.

    Feel free to flame me to a crisp, but that's my take on the situation. Just my .
    Well, 3 months is understandable -- 3 months should be plenty of time to get the hang of a job and learn how to do it well. If someone can't learn the basics of a job in 3 months, then more than likely they aren't even trying. It's just, I had a job where I was booted for not knowing how to do everything in 2 days, which I think is ridiculous and perhaps why I kind of took chi449rk's comment to heart.
  10. Visit  Assidere Hope profile page
    0
    I love this!
  11. Visit  ctmed profile page
    2
    I agree. It is the reason sometimes I take a few breaks from allnurses CNA boards. It is the same questions and comments year in year out. But, what can you say. It is one of the better job discussion boards out there for CNA. I come here even though I am in the middle of being a Occupational Therapy Assistant which will take me completely off these boards in a few years. But, for right now, I am a CNA. But still, I enjoy the nurse boards. Compared to the OT boards I lurk at, you guys have MUCH more fun!

    Now, my personal pet peeve is those complaining about looking for work when they use no paragraphs and have 50+ misspelled words. On gaming hobby forums, we call it "crushed by wall of text" ! Then... never post again!
    loriangel14 and mstearns09 like this.
  12. Visit  Glycerine82 profile page
    1
    Omg poop? My patients don't poop. That's normal isn't it? Well maybe they do but I just leave it for the next shift. After all they're wearing a brief, right. Dihhhh. *smh*
    loriangel14 likes this.


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