First job, first day & body bag

  1. 0
    Hi all -

    Heres my story....

    Got my CNA license almost a year ago. Had to attend personal health issues than my goal was to get an entry position as a CNA. I did as of last week.

    I was SOOO excited to start. I went into my first day of work at a LTC 3rd shift. An agency LPN (first day) a long term CNA and myself (new CNA first day first job in field) to find out that a person was fading. This woman I never met before I sat with for a while chatting to her. With in 3 hours of me being there sadly, she passed on. I had to do some pp care. I was crying all of us were crying. When the morgue came I had to assist in placing her in the body bag.

    As time went on and the shock still over coming me apparenly many of the residents had "the bug" where one person was letting go everywhere I have never seen that much come out if someone...

    As the other employees came on they all seem to be very short because all the residents werent up and ready. I found this facility to be power driven by the 7AM crew & wants it known they are in control. Is this normal?? Is this whats its like everywhere? I know this is part of the job but can expect these occurances all the time with a power struggle? Any advice?

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  2. 0
    As someone that has worked days, eve, and nights. I believe that this is the way it goes. Every shift thinks that they have it toughest. This is not limited to the nursing field either! And, of course, night shift doesn't do anything....yea, right! I mainly work days. However, I know from experience that patients do not go home at 7pm, so, there is still a lot of work to do. Plus, you have to deal with a lot of angry patients that do not want to wake up at 4am to take a shower so that it is "fair" to the day shift crew.

    I think day shift has the benefit of working closer to management, since management works days only, so they may be more familiar with the day shift crew and thus, have management's "ear" a little more. This does give them a little more power.

    My advice...put yourself in the other shift's shoes. You come on, no one is up. Family will be coming in and they will blame the day shift employee because "momma is still in bed in her night gown. You people don't care. I'm gonna sue!" Meanwhile, you are frantically going from room to room, cleaning, dressing, trying to "catch up", call lights keep going off because everyone wants to be up and dressed for their family, but time has ran out. Now, trays have arrived on the floor!!! You decide to get up a couple more residents. While doing this room # ***'s family arrives to see her tray just sitting there. They are about to have an aneurism. So, to make them happy you apologize (because according to management you can't say that you are short staffed...that is a NO NO) and begin feeding that resident while that family watches you (it's not their job to help their loved one! so they will tell you). While feeding that patient, you get paged to room # *** where another family is upset because their loved one is still in bed and now is soiled. A valid complaint, but you are just one person. One person that can not tell the truth and say that they are understaffed. One person that had no control over the events during the night. One person that is doing his best. One person that came into nursing because they truly love helping others. One person that does things for another family's loved one, such as clean them after a bowel movement, that the family does not even want to do themselves. And yet, they look at you as if you just don't care.

    And so, do YOUR best, put the patients first, put yourself in the other shift's shoes, stay AWAY from floor politics, and get involved with the politics of nursing. Nursing is a powerful force. If united, nurses could get mandatory pt to nurse ratios! Healthcare is a business. This is a good and bad thing. Because it can be very profitable, we see a lot of technological advancement and cures for diseases; however, because it is profitable, we see unsafe pt/nurse ratios.

    Sincerely,
    Jay
  3. 0
    Wow thanks Jay for your input.

    First I would like to point out that this was my experience and so far anyone I have run into their experience was nothing like this. I certainly dont want to hinder anyone getting into the field due to my situation.

    Upon getting home and crying on the way home relieved that the shift was over. I took a nice long hot shower to hopefully rid of catching anything. Trying to think of the other nurses perspective. I did think the same things you mentioned. Of coarse I lack the experience so needed the validation from another this was correct. As its a very small facility (20 bed with 1/2 full) I still wonder why the intense remarks from the nurses. However again I do see your point. I just wonder if all 10 were done (they also start at 5AM getting pts up for 8 feeding) and it was only 7 AM.

    I will certainly keep this point in mind. Its difficult not knowing when its my first day there and cant help but wonder will it always be like this. I love people, I love to take care of people. Jay, I am wondering is it like this at a hospital setting too?
  4. 0
    I think it's important to remember that every day is different! You had a rough day on your first day...but don't let that make you go into your second day with a chip on your shoulder. Most likely, circumstances will be more "normal" on your next day, and you'll get a better feel for what it's usually like at your facility.

    I don't know about power driven, but as someone who works evenings, I do know that the dayshift generally does expect certain things to be done. However, this is because dayshift is honestly so much more hectic than evening or night shifts.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that it's easy to work evenings or nights. I work them myself, as I said. But I used to work days, and it is already difficult to get everyone ready and where they need to be by breakfast time or visits...and then when you come in to find that you have extra work to do because night shift didn't get it done, that puts an unbelievable amount of stress on you. You got unlucky with your first day. MOst likely, on most days, someone won't be passing. The residents/patients usually won't be sick all at the same time. Generally, you will have a routine to follow, and after you work for a few days, you'll feel more confident in knowing what you're supposed to do, and everything will run much more smoothly. Don't give up! I think first days are always a little difficult, and due to circumstances, yours was extremely!
  5. 0
    Thanks yousoldtheworld I will keep that in mind

    I'm hoping & praying the next time I am on ( which is still orientation for me) wont be any where remotely close to what I have already went through & will keep a fresh perspective on things. I will let you know how it goes.

    Keep your fingers crossed foe me
  6. 0
    I think that no one should really give the "other" shift a hard time. Nursing is a 24/7 thing. if something does not get done, I think that it should just be passed on in report, such as room # *** did not get a bath tonight. It should be followed by a reply of, "that's ok. I know you guys can have some hectic nights. See you this evening!" The day shift should go on to give their best with the time alotted and the staff present. Should something not be completed, then it should just be assumed that they did their best and "drive on."

    I am sure you will find that LTC and hospital settings are both equal in the battle between the shifts. The best thing is just to assume that the shift before you gave their all. As a cna, I know that in the hospital and when I worked in a nursing home that there was often only two cna's for 38 patients. You can bet I counted on things not being done. I didn't blame the night shift; I blame the facility for allowing this to happen.

    I hope you have a better shift next time. Keep a positive attitude and remember that the people on the other shift are still your coworkers and that you all have the same goal to provide outstanding care for the patients.
  7. 0
    There are no easy shifts. Maybe if I could work between 1245 and 1500 everyday....but then I would be working less then 12 hours per week...

    You sure had a tough experience to start off with! There will be better days. It is great that you care so much.
  8. 0
    Quote from jb2u
    As someone that has worked days, eve, and nights. I believe that this is the way it goes. Every shift thinks that they have it toughest. This is not limited to the nursing field either! And, of course, night shift doesn't do anything....yea, right! I mainly work days. However, I know from experience that patients do not go home at 7pm, so, there is still a lot of work to do. Plus, you have to deal with a lot of angry patients that do not want to wake up at 4am to take a shower so that it is "fair" to the day shift crew.

    I think day shift has the benefit of working closer to management, since management works days only, so they may be more familiar with the day shift crew and thus, have management's "ear" a little more. This does give them a little more power.

    My advice...put yourself in the other shift's shoes. You come on, no one is up. Family will be coming in and they will blame the day shift employee because "momma is still in bed in her night gown. You people don't care. I'm gonna sue!" Meanwhile, you are frantically going from room to room, cleaning, dressing, trying to "catch up", call lights keep going off because everyone wants to be up and dressed for their family, but time has ran out. Now, trays have arrived on the floor!!! You decide to get up a couple more residents. While doing this room # ***'s family arrives to see her tray just sitting there. They are about to have an aneurism. So, to make them happy you apologize (because according to management you can't say that you are short staffed...that is a NO NO) and begin feeding that resident while that family watches you (it's not their job to help their loved one! so they will tell you). While feeding that patient, you get paged to room # *** where another family is upset because their loved one is still in bed and now is soiled. A valid complaint, but you are just one person. One person that can not tell the truth and say that they are understaffed. One person that had no control over the events during the night. One person that is doing his best. One person that came into nursing because they truly love helping others. One person that does things for another family's loved one, such as clean them after a bowel movement, that the family does not even want to do themselves. And yet, they look at you as if you just don't care.

    And so, do YOUR best, put the patients first, put yourself in the other shift's shoes, stay AWAY from floor politics, and get involved with the politics of nursing. Nursing is a powerful force. If united, nurses could get mandatory pt to nurse ratios! Healthcare is a business. This is a good and bad thing. Because it can be very profitable, we see a lot of technological advancement and cures for diseases; however, because it is profitable, we see unsafe pt/nurse ratios.

    Sincerely,
    Jay
    Very well said!!!


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