Interview for nursing school

  1. 0
    Hello all. I am a nursing student in the last semester of my program in Glendale Arizona. One of our assignments is to do a presentation about a CNS and interview someone with that title. So far we have not had any luck contacting one here in Az and I was hoping to get a volunteer for an online interview. I would love to hear from anyone interested. Thanks in advance and I hope to hear from someone soon!
    Last edit by traumaRUs on Sep 12, '07 : Reason: Email/name
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  3. 8 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I'm an adult health CNS and would be glad to help. I am also editing your email and name out for your own protection.
  5. 0
    Thanks so much for the quick response. This is a group project so I am running the info by the rest of my group and will get back to you as soon as I can. I appreciate the offer to help and will talk to you soon!
  6. 0
    Hello again. I got the go ahead from the group and have my interview questions if you are still willing to help. I would like to just send them in an email if that is something you would be willing to do or if you would rather I can just post them in a reply here. Please get back to me as soon as you can with a response and we will go from there.

    Again, thanks for your help and I hope to hear from you soon.
  7. 0
    Hi there - just got back from a conference in Vegas - ready to go - just post them here and that way others will answer too, hopefully.
  8. 0
    wonderful, thanks for your help.

    first off, please tell us your area of expertise and what exactly your role is where you work.

    how does your job help the patient?

    is there a specilaity where being a cns is more valuable?

    who do you report to?

    do you supervise anyone?

    does your expertise help make hospital policy or for 1 particular unit?

    is the position more of an admistrative funciton?

    what are the educational requriements?

    what made you decide to pursue the cns?

    where did you attend classes?

    did it meet your expectations?

    has the credential opened any doors?

    how have you used it in your career?

    would you recommend it and if so, why?

    what about being a cns differs from another nurse, for example, a critical care nurse?

    what are the benefits of being a cns?

    does being a cns take you away from the bedside?

    are there more supervisory duties as a cns?

    describe a day in the life of a cns.

    again, thanks for all of your help and if anyone else has anything to add, please do. if you can think of any additional information you think would be helpful in describing your role as a cns, please fill in as you please. i am looking forward to your response.
  9. 1
    okay - here goes:

    first off, please tell us your area of expertise and what exactly your role is where you work.

    i'm currently working in nephrology but have given my notice recently and am moving to a hospital where i will be helping to start a palliative care program.

    how does your job help the patient? as an apn, my job helps the pt by providing bedside care to the patient, more education than the md has time to provide as well as providing the pt and family with one person to contact

    is there a specilaity where being a cns is more valuable?if you mean being a cns is better than say an np or pa in a certain specialty i would think that would depend on your states practice act.

    who do you report to?i currently report to 14 mds. in my new job, i will be working with only one md

    do you supervise anyone?i do not directly supervise anyone at this time. however, i interact with other apns, rns and assistive personnel. i do have input on performance evaluations.

    does your expertise help make hospital policy or for 1 particular unit?in my new job, i will be helping to write policies and procedures for a new palliative care program which will be hospital-wide (710 beds)

    is the position more of an admistrative funciton?no, i have hands-on care responsibilities and would not like an administrative only position.

    what are the educational requriements?the basic education is at least a masters degree in nursing (msn). however, per the ancc (am nurses credentialling center, effective 2015, you will need a doctorate.

    what made you decide to pursue the cns?my goal was to be an apn versus only a cns. in some states a cns is not an apn. fortunately in il, they are on par with an np and pa.

    where did you attend classes?i did my msn online via the university of phoenix and then went to osf saint francis college of nursing in peoria, il for the adult health cns.

    did it meet your expectations?yes

    has the credential opened any doors?yes, because w/o it, i would still be a staff nurse.

    how have you used it in your career?see my above answer

    would you recommend it and if so, why?yes indeed. it provides a way to remain active in nursing as you age and also gives you the chance to give back to nursing as an educator.

    what about being a cns differs from another nurse, for example, a critical care nurse?a staff nurse provides the hands-on care of the pt on a day to day basis. the cns is a consultant who is asked for an opinion and perhaps treatment options.

    what are the benefits of being a cns?usually day shift, more autonomy, more money, more job satisfaction because your work is self-directed.

    does being a cns take you away from the bedside?you are still at the bedside just in a different role.

    are there more supervisory duties as a cns?depends and varies with each job.

    describe a day in the life of a cns.
    right at the moment i'm working 50-60 hours per week and don't particularly care for that time committment which is why i'm leaving.
    sogreenrn likes this.
  10. 0
    Thanks so much for your help in this. I appreciate you taking the time to answer the questions. I just have one more question for you if you don't mind. Where is it that you are transferring to? Is it just a private practice doc?

    Thanks again!
  11. 0
    I actually currently work for a large nephrology practice (14 MDs, 8 mid-levels). I am transferring back to the hospital where I worked for 10 years (until July 2006). It is a large, level one trauma center (710 beds).


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