What happens when you lose a patient?

  1. What happens when you lose a patient? What happens soon right afterwards?

    Are you and/or the surgeon temporarily suspended?

    How soon before you are allowed to work on a patient again?

    Thank you.
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   fiestynurse
    Are you asking what happens when a patient dies in surgery? It depends on the type of surgery and the circumstances surrounding the death. Was there gross negligence on the part of the doctors and nurses? Surgery is never without risk and death is one of the possible outcomes.
  4. by   huggietoes
    I do not think I completely understand the question. Do you mean after a code? I can not speak for the OR, but usually, if the family is present someone speaks to them and counselling is offered, then the Red Cross 1-800 number has to be called so that you can get your reference number as far as organ donation is concerned. The patient is shrouded and taken to the morgue for transport to the funeral home of their choice or for pick up by the coroner. Is this what you are looking for?

    Like I said can not speak for the OR, however, in other units you go right on to the next patient. Sometimes code(s), [plural] are happening at once so you can't just stop taking care of patients even immediately after someone expires.
    Last edit by huggietoes on Apr 5, '04
  5. by   Salus
    I am not a nurse so I am sorry if my question was vague. Your answers did answer my question.

    What is code?
  6. by   unikuelady
    My first thought to your question was: You better find the patient before your supervisor finds out! I've had this happen to a fellow nurse before. Patient was supposed to be on complete bedrest with BRP. (Antepartum pt with ruptured membranes 27 weeks gestation). This patient has been in the hospital for 8 weeks already. She decided to leave the hospital and have her hair done, she said she knew what time her medications were due and testing that needed to be done....so she snuck out and returned to her room 5 min before her 1700 medication was due. After the MD was informed and the patient suffered no ill effects..we all had a good laugh. She ended up delivering at 28 weeks. Baby ended up being fine after staying in the NICU for 2 months.
  7. by   Salus
    It seems like nurses could make millions writing books about things like that.
  8. by   UCDSICURN
    A "code" as it was referred to above is short for Code Blue, the universal, my patient is crashing, call for help. It's announced overhead in the hospital and at bigger facilities to the code blue beepers.

    In small hospitals, like the one I used to work at, an ICU nurse, respiratory therapist, ER doc, ER tech, nursing supervisor and security would respond.

    In a big university hospital like I work at now, a code blue team will respond, which includes 2 ICU nurses, respiratory, a pharmacist, nursing supervisor, and the various residents from various services on the code team that day and then some.

    Hope this helps.

    Donn C.
  9. by   TraumaNurse
    If you go to this website www.gasnet.org/videos/index.php you can watch a video called 'anesthetic catastrophy'. It is a great video with a lot of valuable info. I think it may answer some of your questions. Hope this helps. (it is helpful if you have broadband )
  10. by   Kiwi
    Quote from TraumaNurse
    If you go to this website www.gasnet.org/videos/index.php you can watch a video called 'anesthetic catastrophy'. It is a great video with a lot of valuable info. I think it may answer some of your questions. Hope this helps. (it is helpful if you have broadband )
    WOW! Thanks for sharing the link to this informative video.

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