Travel CRNA?

  1. Can you be a Travel Nurse as an CRNA? If you can and have been a travel nurse as a CRNA I would really love to hear about some of your experiences. Thank you so much!
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   ICUman
    It is called locum tenems CRNA. You travel as a CRNA, not a nurse. There are many opportunities for it. Talk about a dream career...
  4. by   LaJollalove
    Thank you for your fast response and information! When you write "dream job", do you mean it's a great job or that's it's very difficult to become? I see you work in the ICU, what do you like/dislike about it? Thank you for your time.
  5. by   allenaa2016
    I was hoping to hear from someone who does it I'm in CRNA school now and am interested.
  6. by   06crna
    I did this for years, sometimes through a locums agency and other times negotiating my own contracts. I learned a lot and often had great experiences, but I will pass along that it is a role best suited for a CRNA with strong well-rounded clinical skills, a pleasant flexible personality, and the ability to be handed a set of scrubs and start working with no complaints.

    With each job, it becomes more difficult to credential at subsequent locations due to lengthy background checks, medical staff inquiries, malpractice checks, case log submission, etc. I finally stopped taking these jobs after obtaining privileges at 20+ sites. Credentialing took 4-5 months hospitals couldn't wait that long for me to be processed, even with a completely clean record.

    Some in the medical locums/temp field think that this industry is going to shrink significantly for that reason.
  7. by   Bluebolt
    Quote from 06crna
    I did this for years, sometimes through a locums agency and other times negotiating my own contracts. I learned a lot and often had great experiences, but I will pass along that it is a role best suited for a CRNA with strong well-rounded clinical skills, a pleasant flexible personality, and the ability to be handed a set of scrubs and start working with no complaints.

    With each job, it becomes more difficult to credential at subsequent locations due to lengthy background checks, medical staff inquiries, malpractice checks, case log submission, etc. I finally stopped taking these jobs after obtaining privileges at 20+ sites. Credentialing took 4-5 months hospitals couldn't wait that long for me to be processed, even with a completely clean record.

    Some in the medical locums/temp field think that this industry is going to shrink significantly for that reason.
    I've heard this from other CRNAs. I was a travel RN for a few years before I began CRNA school and considered the locums option after graduation but I've reconsidered after hearing various feedback. It does seem like the politics and legal matters makes it difficult to do locums as your primary work.

    I do know many CRNAs work a normal position and have another hospital or practice not far off that they'll pick up extra cases at, I may do that. I'm not well versed in non compete clauses but I wonder if that would complicate doing that.

    Anyway that's hardly an equivalent to being a travel nurse who lives in California for 3 months, NYC for 3 months, Hawaii 3 months, Texas 3 months.. which is what nurses imagine "locums" to be.
  8. by   06crna
    Correct. Locums work as a CRNA is not equivalent to travel nursing. When you work as an advanced practice nurse, you must apply to and become accepted to the medical staff for every facility where you practice. For some facilities, like outpatient centers, this can be straightforward, while it can take up to six months at large multi-site medical centers.

    Locums was my primary work off & on for a few years, but it is not a sustainable long-term career option due to medical staff credentialing.

    Many CRNAs have side gigs working PRN or use vacation to work locums at a hospital that has recurring coverage needs. If I had to do it again, I would not waste time credentialing at sites that needed me for only a week here or there. The money I earned was not worth the paperwork or addition to my growing list of sites, which you will have to report, in at least duplicate, EVERY time you change jobs or apply to the medical staff.

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