How much is malpractice insurance for a CRNA (Nurse Anesthetist) per year?

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    How much is malpractice insurance for a CRNA (Nurse Anesthetist) per year?

    Does anyone know what the average cost of malpractice insurance is for a CRNA (nurse anesthetist) is per week, month, year? How does this work... do you set up the insurance and pay for it in a "bill" form... or does it get automatically deducted from your weekly pay check?

    I know starting salaries for CRNAs is around $115000-150000 per year, depending on where you live and work, and I am trying to get a ballpark figure of how much you take home (after taxes, malpractice insurance, health insurance, retirement, etc...) Anyone have any idea of how much you actually TAKE HOME for pay as a CRNA?


    Also, I know some places say they PAY for your malpractice insurance, health insurance, etc. 100% as part of your benefits... is this common? At first, I thought CNRAs were covered under Anesthesiologists, and that they didn't need malpractice insurance... but it seems that this is not the case...

    Thanks for your repsonses!
    mc28cat likes this.
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  4. 5 Comments so far...

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    12 to 18K a year depending on history, location etc. If you get it day to day... expect to payabout $90/day for minimal coverage. Almost every employee will pick this cost up, either by a policy or in large institutions, self insurance.

    You are correct to think we are not covered under the physicians. We are held to exactly the same practice standard of care as a physician. And in being so, are unique in the advanced practice nurse role.
  6. 1
    Quote from cessnadriver
    12 to 18K a year depending on history, location etc. If you get it day to day... expect to payabout $90/day for minimal coverage. Almost every employee will pick this cost up, either by a policy or in large institutions, self insurance.

    You are correct to think we are not covered under the physicians. We are held to exactly the same practice standard of care as a physician. And in being so, are unique in the advanced practice nurse role.
    I'll let some of the NPs that do expert witness chime in, but in doing expert witness work I've found that this is incorrect. There is a community standard of care regardless of whether you are a physician, APN or PA. All providers are held to that standard of care.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
    sirI likes this.
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    I was not aware there were independent practice NPs. I stand corrected. This is something new I would presume.
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    Quote from cessnadriver
    I was not aware there were independent practice NPs. I stand corrected. This is something new I would presume.
    There are a number of states where an NP can practice substantially independently (only needs physician collaboration for Medicare/Caid billing).

    The issue is not independence. Its commonality of practice. Any provider that sees a patient has a standard of care that they must meet. The community standard of care is defined by all providers. Since most of the providers in a given community are physicians the physician community standard of care is what usually holds course. If for some odd reason the nurse practitioner or PA community standard of care was higher then it would default to this (although I have a hard time evisioning such a scenario).

    Part of any tort case is breach of duty. This means that the provider failed to conform to the relevant standard of care. The standard of care may be breached due to an obvious error or it may be established by expert testimony.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
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    Back to point, most of the times it is picked up by an employer cost 12-18000 a year can be less however, and you are correct we are not covered by the MD, for anything just like you (I think) the excuse of I followed the doctors order cuts zero ice.


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