How many CRNA's out there that didn't picture themselves in the field?

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    I graduated in May and never really wanted to be a CRNA all throughout school. I've seen a few during clinical in surgeries/procedures we got to watch and the work just never looked interesting to me.

    All of my friends in nursing school wanted to be CRNA's. There were so many people who said they were going to be CRNA's yet just barely made it through our pharmacology and critical care courses. This isn't to say they won't make great CRNA's if they go that route, but their intelligence in the classroom didn't really reflect their ability to go on to such an advanced degree IMO. I've read lots of posts about people worried that the market may become saturated due to this, but a valid point always brought up is the selection criteria weed people out. Think back to high school and how many people said they were going to be doctors. Most likely only a handful, if any, actually went through with it.

    I had the wrong impression of CRNA's based on what I saw them do. I saw them do nothing, which for the most part in a stable , "simple" case is true from what I gather. What I didn't see was how much work and effort went into prepping the patient for procedures/surgeries and the incredible amount of knowledge they have which can be put into use at the drop of a hat (or hair net, hehe).

    I have given lots of thought to CRNA school over the last few months. I'm an independent RN in a large medical ICU and feel they're preparing me well. I get tons of vents and drips, extubations/reintubations same day, etc. I had the luxury of working with my first Swan a few weeks ago and was ecstatic the whole night seeing everything it could do, shooting outputs, wedging, etc.

    I am always complimented on how well I understand pathophysiology and pharmacology (I'm a walking Davis Drug Guide lol), and I absolutely love unstable patients. All the things that excite me in the medical ICU appear to be things I would be surrounded by as a CRNA. I feel bad considering this as a future profession because I talked so poorly of it when I knew so little, but after all the posts I've read, people I've talked with at work, I know it's simply because I wasn't seeing enough of what the job truly entailed.

    Short novel aside, is there anyone here who graduated/became an RN and never gave thought to the CRNA route until later on that wouldn't mind giving me some feedback? I know so many people that planned to be a CRNA from the get-go that I'm having a hard time finding people who were like me.
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  4. 5 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    My story is similar to yours. I worked as an RN for 4 years before I realized I wanted to become a nurse anesthetist. In fact, I was enrolled in an FNP program and feeling less than challenged. Figured things out after talking with a few CRNAs at the beach one day. Had a major course correction, did what I had to do and now push gas.

    If you want to be a CRNA do what YOU have to do and become a CRNA. It sounds like you are already on the right track. Don't spend time worrying about what other individual motivations are. Worry about your own. You will be better off this way.
  6. 0
    Quote from RedCell
    My story is similar to yours. I worked as an RN for 4 years before I realized I wanted to become a nurse anesthetist. In fact, I was enrolled in an FNP program and feeling less than challenged. Figured things out after talking with a few CRNAs at the beach one day. Had a major course correction, did what I had to do and now push gas.

    If you want to be a CRNA do what YOU have to do and become a CRNA. It sounds like you are already on the right track. Don't spend time worrying about what other individual motivations are. Worry about your own. You will be better off this way.
    Good to hear in the first reply. I was fearing a "Don't become a CRNA then, we don't have simple patients! :trout:" response.

    I have numerous coworkers who are enrolled in NP programs. The coursework just seems incredibly boring and far too research focused to garner any of my interest. That's another thing that pushed me into looking at CRNA school, because frankly I couldn't put up with two years of what they're doing. The one school I am looking at, the CRNA program is 2 years straight through and the cirriculum looks very appealing to me.

    Thanks for the response!
  7. 0
    I've been a nurse for years and did not consider CRNA school. Several girls I went to school (ASN) with said that is what they were going to do, get their BSN and eventually go to CRNA school, but years later not one of them has even advanced to a BSN. I guess for most people this is an unattainable goal.

    Except for pharmacology and pathophysiology most of the undergrad nursing classes I took seemed rather pointless. I like hands on and doing, not talking about silly nonsense. I've looked into NP school but I'm not sure it fits my style, either. Nursing theory and research bore me to tears. It seems a CRNA's job is more to the point without the holistic BS and fluff and being expected to counsel and educate people (who are uneducable and don't care, anyway) about things anyone with the IQ of a turnip would understand. And I can't imagine suffering through endless sessions of listening to people whine and complain and go on and on about real and imagined ailments and their personal life. I totally understand why primary care doctors are accused of being insensitive and in a hurry, dealing with that kind of crap day in and day out will eat your soul away.
  8. 0
    I was a flight nurse for several years, and an ER nurse before that in a busy trauma center. I too, never thought I would become a CRNA, and thought the same as you; that it was boring, not a challenge etc. But I was trying to find something to transition into, because I was tired of the flight politics, and I went to NP school and was bored out of my mind. Several flight nurses I worked with went the CRNA route and loved it so I thought I would go for it. I am so glad I did! I absolutely LOVE my job, best decision I ever made! CRNA school is the hardest thing I have ever done, and a definite challenge! Yes most of the time it's smooth sailing, but I work at a busy county trauma center and most of our patients are pretty sick. Things can go wrong in a heartbeat, and just that, and knowing it's all on me, is enough! Plus the skills I get to practice are fun (central lines, epidurals, regionals, etc) Excellent career choice! You go for it if that's what you want to do!
    Good luck to you!

    Deb
  9. 0
    Deb-

    Did you complete NP school prior to beginning the CRNA program?

    I am in my third semester of the FNP program at TWU-Dallas. Frankly, its not a challenge for me. It feels like a lot of busy work and Im already bored. I started looking into CRNA about a month ago. Im currently an ER nurse with three years of experience. I am ready and willing to transfer to an ICU to gain more "intensive" critical care experiences.

    I guess my question is more related to how to make myself a stronger applicant. Would it benefit me to complete my FNP degree while I get my ICU background under my belt? Or would ACNP be more beneficial? Im scheduled to graduate in May 2011 and am looking at Texas Wesleyan and Texas Christian as possibilities.

    I have no husband and no children, so its a good time for me to gear up for the program, I just dont know if its worth me finishing my FNP degree first. (Obviously I wouldnt just quit until I were actually accepted into a program... I just dont want to keep throwing money, time and effort into something that Im already bored with).

    Any and all input is appreciated!!

    Rachel


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