Hiring A Surgery Center CRNA

  1. I'm considering hiring CRNA's to work per diem at multiple northern California surgery centers. I've been perusing the internet to educate myself about CRNA's. I just had a few questions:

    The MD's at our surgery centers want propofol sedation for their cases (colonoscopies, pain management and plastic surgery). There is no general anesthesia involved. Would CRNA's be interested in doing this work? (an anesthesiologist has been doing the work for the past 2 years).

    What about income? We were thinking of offering $85-125 per hr. The day starts at 8am and usually finishes around 5pm. There is a 60-90 minute lunch. There are no weekends, holidays, or call. It would start at 2 days per week guaranteed and possibly progress to 4 or 5.

    What about malpractice? What's the cost of CRNA malpractice insurance in CA? Do CRNA's in the locums market carry their own insurance?

    Finally, where's the best place to post jobs or find qualified CRNA's?

    Thanks in advance for your answers. If you have any other tips, please do not hesitate to offer them. You can post answers or feel free to email me directly at the email listed with my profile.

    Thanks again,

    Marcellus
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   CraigBSN02
    Check http://www.gaswork.com for a good clearinghouse of jobs and CRNAs looking for jobs. It lists salary as well, you can tell if you're in the range for the person you want to hire.

    (Full disclosure - I am not a CRNA)

    CRNAs can and do use propofol for procedural sedation like what you describe.

    Insurance is too nebulous a topic to answer here. Some CRNAs carry their own insurance, others have it provided by their employers, but that's usually a perk for full time employees. Cost also varies, depending on practice setting and other situations.

    Good luck on your search. :spin:
  4. by   ready4crna?
    try aana.com for the professional organization that reaches nearly 95% of all CRNA's.
    Otherwise, there are others on this board who might be able to direct you for other recruitment avenues.
  5. by   Snorer1
    Marcellus, contact me re:sedation for GI. I have been doing it for the last 6 years
    Last edit by sirI on Jun 28, '08
  6. by   loveanesthesia
    CRNAs can, and do, provide the type of service you describe. You should not have much trouble finding a CRNA who can meet your needs. I would also suggest contacting the California Association of Nurse Anesthetists, they would likely have suggestions for recruitment in your area.
  7. by   rncam
    Quote from Marcellus
    I'm considering hiring CRNA's to work per diem at multiple northern California surgery centers. I've been perusing the internet to educate myself about CRNA's. I just had a few questions:

    The MD's at our surgery centers want propofol sedation for their cases (colonoscopies, pain management and plastic surgery). There is no general anesthesia involved. Would CRNA's be interested in doing this work? (an anesthesiologist has been doing the work for the past 2 years).

    What about income? We were thinking of offering $85-125 per hr. The day starts at 8am and usually finishes around 5pm. There is a 60-90 minute lunch. There are no weekends, holidays, or call. It would start at 2 days per week guaranteed and possibly progress to 4 or 5.

    What about malpractice? What's the cost of CRNA malpractice insurance in CA? Do CRNA's in the locums market carry their own insurance?

    Finally, where's the best place to post jobs or find qualified CRNA's?

    Thanks in advance for your answers. If you have any other tips, please do not hesitate to offer them. You can post answers or feel free to email me directly at the email listed with my profile.

    Thanks again,

    Marcellus
    I work at an Eye surgery center, with all CRNA's> They do not get paid hourly. They bill for the case just like the MD. There are 5 in their practice and they cover several surgery centers. They do general and conscious sedation. They do use propofol, versed, fentanyl, whatever they deem is appropriate for the patient. Hope this helps.

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