Clinical Doctorate in Anesthsia - page 8

I've read and heard that eventually, 2011 - 2013, the entry level degree into Nurse Anesthsia will be a Doctorate (comparable to PharmD). Can anyone at this time offer any specifics on how this is... Read More

  1. by   soliant12
    I understood from the 75th AANA meeting that this proposal is dead. The impotant thing is do the numbers show that CRNA's need to be practicing at a doctoral level? I would say no since there are no differences in outcome when compared to MDAs
  2. by   DrEdwina
    Quote from soliant12
    I understood from the 75th AANA meeting that this proposal is dead. The impotant thing is do the numbers show that CRNA's need to be practicing at a doctoral level? I would say no since there are no differences in outcome when compared to MDAs
    For NP's The proposal was approved. The first Practice Doctorate NP's graduated from Columbia, in New York.
  3. by   mwbeah
    Quote from DrEdwina
    For NP's The proposal was approved. The first Practice Doctorate NP's graduated from Columbia, in New York.
    AANA doesn't currently support the timeline proposed by the AACN.

    http://www.aana.com/members/presiden..._ltr061505.pdf
  4. by   mwbeah
    Quote from dredwina
    for np's the proposal was approved. the first practice doctorate np's graduated from columbia, in new york.
    [font=timesnewromanpsmt]
    "the task force on the essentials of the dnp is comprised of individuals representing multiple constituencies in advanced nursing practice. the series of regional hearings that will be conducted from september 2005 to january 2006 is designed to involve a larger and more diverse group of stakeholders in the process, which will shape the education of nurses prepared for the highest level of nursing practice. "

    its great they graduated but official recognition is a ways away.

    http://www.aacn.nche.edu/dnp/pdf/essentials.pdf
  5. by   mwbeah
    1. doctorate in nursing practice (dnp): the american association of colleges of nursing (aacn) board of directors charged an 11 member task force with examining the current status of clinical or practice doctoral programs, and with comparing various models and making recommendations regarding future developments. the task force identified 13 recommendations in a draft position statement on the doctorate in nursing practice (dnp).

    in october 2004, the aana and coa were informed that the aacn's draft position statement on the doctorate in nursing practice was being brought to the october 25, 2004 aacn membership meeting for action. the aacn membership voted to accept the position statement to transition all advanced practice nursing educational programs to the dnp by 2015.

    to date the aacn has established two task forces: one for the implementation of the dnp and the other to develop the essentials document. i am happy to report that ed thompson, crna, phd, program director at the university of iowa college of nurse anesthesia program, was appointed to the essentials task force.

    the dnp movement was discussed at the council/aana liaison luncheon during the fall assembly of states in november 2004. as a result of that conversation and the concerns expressed i recommended that a summit of the nurse anesthesia community and other interested stakeholders be convened as soon as possible. the summit is now scheduled to meet june 9-10, 2005 at the chicago o'hare marriott hotel. (i will speak to the summit later in my report).

    the dnp has sparked a significant amount of controversy not only in the academic community, but also in the practitioner and other communities.
    it is important that this body thoroughly discuss the issues and their impact on the profession, and provides guidance to the coa and the aana.


    there will be a number of focus sessions at this meeting conducted by linda shinn to gather information that will assist us during the summit in june. i would encourage you to sign up at the meeting registration desk for one of the focus sessions.

    also, if you have not read the article written by dolores clement, drph, in the aana journal, february 2005, vol. 73, no. 1, titled "impact of the clinical doctorate from an allied health perspective," you should do so, because the information she provides is very insightful.


    http://www.aana.com/members/presiden...i032805asf.asp
  6. by   lml33
    I'm going to bluntly honest..........Show me the money and I'll be back in school! I honestly doubt that we will see any salary increase. And for all of those who strive for more letters after your name, more power to ya! LML33.
  7. by   ICRN2008
    Quote from rn29306
    I don't have a problem calling PharmD's "dr", because in my experience, it is never in front of the patient. They always are looking at charts and labs at the desk in the units and thus it is not a question of misleading. .
    This is not exactly true..my sister is a PharmD doing a clinical residency, and she is called "Dr" by some physicians on the floors. She went to school for seven years plus one year of residency, and she has most assuredly earned the title "doctor". The issue here is educating the patients about the fact that that not all medical professionals with the title "doctor" are MD's or DO's. They might be DPT's, DPM's, PharmD's, DNP's, PhD's, DDS's etc. I do not believe that MD's have the exclusive right to the title and to say as much is to negate the contributions of other allied health professionals.
  8. by   jewelcutt
    Let me tell you, if I was going to get my doctorate in anything, it would definitely not be nursing! I don't even want think about school after this disasterous time of my life is over, let alone take a bunch of stupid nursing phD level courses. And don't be fooled, our school is implementing a DNP program. It is not more clinical time, nor is it more academia on specialties, but a bunch of hogwash nursing research and theory courses. If I HAD to choose, I would get a doctorate in phys or pharm.
  9. by   yoga crna
    I have mixed feelings about this topic. Have you ever noticed how many initials some nurses have after their name? It seems to me that the more initials, the less self confident they are. And, none of those initials equate to MD or come with the respect that MD conveys to the public. Sorry, some of you aren't going to like what I write, but I have been observing ths for many years.

    On the other side, I think the degree of responsibility and education of CRNAs is close to being at the doctoral level. What I would like to know, is what are the additional courses needed to get this doctorate? If it is a clinical doctorate, is there research required, and/or additional clinical time and subspecialitzation?

    In the real world, what will a clinical doctorate do for the practitioner and the patient? Will you get more income--probably not for clinical anesthesia. Will you be able to do the much needed research and publish? I am better at asking questions than answering them, but before we commit to more years of education, more money for that education we need to do a cost-benefit analysis.

    Personally, I made a decision to go to law school and get a JD. It has been very useful in my clinical practice and has given me the opportunity to write, lecture and do consulting work. If I were younger, I would get an MBA, because the business of anesthesia is an exciting and interesting field for me.

    In conclusion, I must agree with the above post regarding nusing theory courses. I have a considerable amount of destain for all of that foolishness and find the information of very little clinical use. Instead, emphasis on the hard sciences would be more useful and would give our profession more credibility.
  10. by   mwbeah
    Quote from yoga crna
    Instead, emphasis on the hard sciences would be more useful and would give our profession more credibility.
    Amen
  11. by   gaspassah
    not only do i agree with an emphasis on hard science. but we also need to push or advertise that our work in critical care at the bedside is what prepares us clinically for anesthesia. many mds talk about their residencies. i worked 6.5 years in the icu titrating gtts and managing fluids while directly observing the patient responses, i call this my "residency". i have always felt this parallels anesthesia quite closely. titration and administration of drugs while monitoring patient responses.
    thusly i think there needs to be some way to intigrate the critical care experience into the anesthesia education timeframe. i doubt there is a way to do it, but it would certainly be beneficial.
    d
  12. by   SigmaSRNA
    Quote from mwbeah
    Amen
    What university and in what area of study are you getting your PhD in? I'm interested in UTHSCH program in neuroscience when I finish school and work a little. Thanks in advance
  13. by   mwbeah
    Quote from SigmaSRNA
    What university and in what area of study are you getting your PhD in? I'm interested in UTHSCH program in neuroscience when I finish school and work a little. Thanks in advance
    I am in the Uniformed Services University PhD program in Neuroscience www.usuhs.mil

    Mike

Must Read Topics


close