AANA press release

  1. Did anyone else read the new press release on the AANA website regarding the reuse of needles and syringes? I find it very disturbing that any health practitioner would reuse a syringe, let alone a NEEDLE!! What is even more disturbing is that the survey revealed that only 56% of participants stated there is never a circumstance in which it would be acceptable to reuse a syringe or needle!! How could 44% of participants believe it would ever be acceptable? Can anyone think of an instance in which they believe it would be appropriate to reuse a syringe or needle? I can't!!

    Ami
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   Roland
    I posted a thread about the CRNA accused of reusing needles and didn't get much resonce. I can't help but feel that I'm missing a really importent piece of the puzzle that most people don't want to discuss. I'm hoping that more clinical experience as a nurse will clarify the issue for me.
  4. by   nilepoc
    Define reuse. Without seeing the questions asked, it is a little hard to jump to conclusions about what is right and waht is wrong. I used to "reuse" a syringe by drawing up 20 vials of vecuronium to make two drips at the same time. Then I took one of these drips to one patient and one to the other.
    Did I reuse a syringe? I have a feeling this is not what they are refering to, but you have to be specific when you decide your position on something. I in no way advocate reusing syringes that have touched a patient, but there are situations where it would be wasteful to use a new syringe for every action you do, i.e. in the example above.
  5. by   kmchugh
    Another example of reusing syringes: I always have four syringes on the back of my machine. They contain atropine, lidocaine, phenylepherine, and ephedrine. Thoughout the course of the case, I will administer these drugs (each syringe contains between 2 and 10 normally administered doses) though a running IV to the patient. For example, if the patient's BP hits 75/30, with a heart rate of 82, I will administer 0.1 mg phenylepherine. That is 1 cc from a 10 cc syringe. If later in the case, the patient's condition warrants it, I will administer another cc to the patient from the same syringe. Both injections are given through the IV. So, in that sense, I reuse syringes and needles every day.

    However, I never reuse a syringe or needle between patients. When a syringe gets used on one patient, it gets dumped in the sharps box at the end of the case.

    Kevin McHugh, CRNA
  6. by   AmiK25
    Kevin, ss I understood the press release, they were referring to the use of one syringe or one needle on two or more different patients. Apparently, several cases of Hepatitis C have been transmitted by anesthesia providers through the reuse of needles. I am sure there have been transmissions by other health professionals, but they specifically cited cases of certain anesthesia providers.

    Nilepoc, if you are preparing two gtts from one syringe before you ever see the patients, I do not feel this is reusing a needle. I was referring to the practice of using a syringe or needle(especially a needle) on one patient and then also using it on the next patient. The press release was not very specific when discussing which questions were asked in the telephone interviews. However, I do know they asked all particpants (MDA's, MD's, CRNA's, and RN's) if there was ever an appropriate time to use the same syringe or needle on two different patients and only 56% said no. Granted, some of those who said yes may have been referring to the type of situation you described in which the syringes are used to prepare gtts, not to actually inject drugs into patients. However, if I were asked that question I would not think of that situation, I would assume they meant to ask about direct use of a syringe/needle on a patient (But, we all know what happens when we assume things, don't we?).

    Thanks,
    Ami

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