Advice for someone considering RN in AR

  1. 0
    I'm currently a dental hygienist in Jonesboro, AR and thinking about going to ASU to get a BSN. There is currently a lack of jobs for hygienists, I've been without a job for 3 months!

    Just wanted to know if there's really a need for RN's in Jonesboro? What is the standard rate of pay in Northeast Arkansas? I just don't want to go back to school and not have a job when I get out.

    I was also thinking about going on to become a CRNA.

    Just need some help deciding what to do. I appreciate any advice anyone can give.

    Thanks!
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  4. 0
    Quote from RDH
    I'm currently a dental hygienist in Jonesboro, AR and thinking about going to ASU to get a BSN. There is currently a lack of jobs for hygienists, I've been without a job for 3 months!

    Just wanted to know if there's really a need for RN's in Jonesboro? What is the standard rate of pay in Northeast Arkansas? I just don't want to go back to school and not have a job when I get out.

    I was also thinking about going on to become a CRNA.

    Just need some help deciding what to do. I appreciate any advice anyone can give.

    Thanks!
    I live in Piggott about 1 hr. northeast of Jonesboro. I read the Jonesboro Sun online just about every day. The classifieds always have ads wanting RNs. I am an LPN but will be returning to school in the fall to finish my ASN degree. The average pay for RNs varies by the practice area, i.e. long term care, doctor office, or hospital. The need for RNs is greater in the hospitals as there are more positions open. I think there are some hospitals that will only employ RNs. To work in certain speciality areas of the hospital such as ICU, I believe you must be an RN. This is the area you must work for 1 year in order to meet the minimum experience requirements to apply to CRNA school.(some schools require 2 years experience in ICU)
    In long term care, the LPN can perform most duties that an RN can. This is my practice area. There are administrative positions in long term care and some office jobs for RNs. Mostly it depends on the individual facilities and their policies.
    I think an estimate of pay in Jonesboro might be an "average" base wage of around $17 to $19 dollars an hr and may vary some. You will have shift differentials, speciality area differentials, and sometimes they pay more for people to work weekend hrs. I have been told by RNs that the pay difference for having obtained your BSN rather than ASN is only about $0.25-0.35 more per hr in the hospitals.
    You will have no problem finding a job once obtaining your RN. The shortage is too great, especially for the RNs.
    Good luck.

    Ruth Ann
  5. 0
    Trust me there is no shortages of need for nurses no matter what title you go for. For me personnally I think all nurses should start out as LPN's some people think differently. LPN school gives you so much needed hands on most of the RN programs are based on management skills alone and you need the hands and book smarts. If I were you I would go lpn then bridge over into the Rn and so on.
    Quote from RDH
    I'm currently a dental hygienist in Jonesboro, AR and thinking about going to ASU to get a BSN. There is currently a lack of jobs for hygienists, I've been without a job for 3 months!

    Just wanted to know if there's really a need for RN's in Jonesboro? What is the standard rate of pay in Northeast Arkansas? I just don't want to go back to school and not have a job when I get out.

    I was also thinking about going on to become a CRNA.

    Just need some help deciding what to do. I appreciate any advice anyone can give.

    Thanks!
  6. 0
    Quote from nae
    Trust me there is no shortages of need for nurses no matter what title you go for. For me personnally I think all nurses should start out as LPN's some people think differently. LPN school gives you so much needed hands on most of the RN programs are based on management skills alone and you need the hands and book smarts. If I were you I would go lpn then bridge over into the Rn and so on.
    Are you an RN? ASN? BSN? How do you know that RN programs are solely based on managment skills. LPNs & RNs share many of the same nursing skill...much of the difference lies in the fact that both are taught the "how to" parts, however, RNs are also taught "why". RNs, at least in the BSN, program are also taught management skills, as RNs much delegate to LPNs and ancillary staff.
  7. 0
    Quote from aRNnAR
    Are you an RN? ASN? BSN? How do you know that RN programs are solely based on managment skills. LPNs & RNs share many of the same nursing skill...much of the difference lies in the fact that both are taught the "how to" parts, however, RNs are also taught "why". RNs, at least in the BSN, program are also taught management skills, as RNs much delegate to LPNs and ancillary staff.
    Actually, I am an LPN who is going through the RN program for my bachelors degree. I hope my advice did not offend you or any other nurse online. I only speak of what advice was given to me. I have several RN's in my family and as friends who have came out unsure of their hands on training but are ready, willing and able to sit behind a desk. Lpn's are also taught the "why" in greater length than you might think. The Rn programs I have had experience with mostly teach leadership skills which is good because they are expected to take charge of all situations. To me it seems like you get so much more from becoming an LPN then going on to get your RN. I Have been an LPN for 13 years now and wouldn't trade the experience I have for anything. It helps you through the Rn program to already have some training.


    Personal attack deleted by TraumaRUs.
    Last edit by traumaRUs on Jun 26, '04
  8. 0
    There are job shortages across the state and the country...critical shortages in the larger areas.

    If you are considering advanced practice, I strongly suggest that you obtain your BSN (meaning forgo the LPN or ADN programs) and then get the critical care experience you need for a couple of years. It would be particuarly helpful if you could obtain experience within a high volume CVICU or SICU. Good luck.
  9. 0
    My mother went to LPN school before going to RN school; but, she strongly encouraged me to go straight to RN school. I did, and it was a good decision for me . LPN school lasts one year on average, but the first semester of RN school is the only one that can be challenged by an LPN. Therefore, one spends three years in nursing school rather than two (if you're in the AAS program). Schools differ, but the nursing school I attended spent the vast majority of class, lab, and clinical time on skills, disease processes, and "why".
  10. 0
    I did the long road from LPN to ADN to BSN and now onto the MSN. I really wish that I had done the BSN route first. Since you are asking about CRNA, BSN is perhaps a straighter road to your goal.


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