MA's being used as "nurses" - page 9

Hello all! I work in a private practice office in which I am the only RN. There are several MA's and one LPN. My concern is that the MA's are referred to as "nurses". The patients often do not... Read More

  1. by   lauralassie
    Quote from Jeanbean
    Hello all! I work in a private practice office in which I am the only RN. There are several MA's and one LPN. My concern is that the MA's are referred to as "nurses". The patients often do not know that their "nurse" really isn't one. We all have the same job descriptions and duties, and I was told shortly after starting work (by a non-nurse office manager) that they consider MA's, LPN's and RN's to be the same (it is interesting, though, that I am paid an RN wage). We all are responsible for phone triage one day a week. The team leader for the "nursing staff" is also an MA!! Has anyone else run into this type of situation??

    Well how bout that, there is another forum in General Nusing discussion, called "What the heck are MA school teaching". There is some really good conversation about this topic. MA's do not ....repeat...do not do the same as a nurse. That is why nurses supervise MA's. If an MA thinks that they do the same as an RN or LPN, read the thread in the forum mentioned. This is a disturbing trend in medicine today. MA's are very valuable, however, they are not RN's.
  2. by   Jarnaes
    Orion50, you are my hero. I love your points.
  3. by   lauralassie
    Quote from Orion50
    What clinic do you work for? I can prove my point!

    love this, bet who ever wrote the tread that you are responding too won't be too quick to tell you where they work. Just like , the physician won't be too likley to stand behind the ma or receptionist and say, yes , I told her/him to do that. The Dr will most likley run with his/her tail between the legs, leaving the ma or recep. to fend for themself.
    Last edit by lauralassie on Oct 9, '06
  4. by   lauralassie
    No, your not being aggressive. That's the real world. Ma's recep's, that hide behind the Dr. may be in for a rude awakening unless they are told how it is. I have found that many (not all) ma schools do not go into medical law or scope of practice.
  5. by   nurse4theplanet
    This thread was started in 1999.
  6. by   ladybiker711
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    This thread was started in 1999.
    and unfortunatley still pertinent today
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from ladybiker711
    and unfortunatley still pertinent today
    Yep, nothing's changed about that.
  8. by   NARCAN
    hello everyone, i feel that med. asst. should get paid for their specific jobs and lpn and rn for theirs. i think lpn and rn's go to school with intese training and are given a license for a reason but employers are getting away with by hiring ma's for cheaper and do everything we were training so hard for...now when things go bad... we are liable! one of the reasons i left med. asst. which was only 8 month training for me and that was when i went to high school so i can have a better pay job, i was able to do injections, diabetic ed., triage, wound care, phlebotomy, etc. it was great until employers started to demand more of me as a nurse. when i finally stood up and said no way... i was no longer able to find a good job. now i went to school for lpn but i am concern with once i start working will all my experience be taken in cosideration salary wise. i mean i was m.a. with lots of experience but when you apply as lpn or rn it seems like anything below that does not count??!!! any comments?!!! :uhoh21:
  9. by   smk1
    Quote from narcan
    hello everyone, i feel that med. asst. should get paid for their specific jobs and lpn and rn for theirs. i think lpn and rn's go to school with intese training and are given a license for a reason but employers are getting away with by hiring ma's for cheaper and do everything we were training so hard for...now when things go bad... we are liable! one of the reasons i left med. asst. which was only 8 month training for me and that was when i went to high school so i can have a better pay job, i was able to do injections, diabetic ed., triage, wound care, phlebotomy, etc. it was great until employers started to demand more of me as a nurse. when i finally stood up and said no way... i was no longer able to find a good job. now i went to school for lpn but i am concern with once i start working will all my experience be taken in cosideration salary wise. i mean i was m.a. with lots of experience but when you apply as lpn or rn it seems like anything below that does not count??!!! any comments?!!! :uhoh21:
    unless you intend to work in a clinic, ma experience really won't beconsidered experience as a nurse. as you continue further in your education as a nurse you will understand why. good luck to you.
  10. by   steelcityrn
    This old post caught my attention because this just happened to me yesterday. I had to call a patients p.c.p., and I had heard they hired a med asst. that I knew. When I asked if a nurse was available, I was told "Just one minute, Mike will be with you ". Hummm, wonder if thats the same guy. Yup, he answers. I say, "Mike, your not a nurse". He says "I know , but they tell me to answer the calls as a nurse". To me, this shows little respect for nurses.
    Last edit by steelcityrn on Aug 15, '07
  11. by   Clays02
    I really cannot STAND when MA's call themselves nurses. I always say to them, "Oh, you're a registered nurse?" and the reply is always, "Well, no, I'm an MA." Nursing is an art, science, and philosophy and so much more multi-dimensional than being a Medical Assistant. I worked as a medical assistant for a very short time while I was in nursing school and I always corrected patients and my coworkers when they were referred to as nurses. I could go on and on about this. It's really aggravating to me. I worked so hard to make it through nursing school with very good grades (successfully) and pass my boards. People who don't go through this educational process don't deserve to call themselves a nurse. Alright...I'll get off my soapbox now.
  12. by   sharona97
    Quote from narcan
    hello everyone, i feel that med. asst. should get paid for their specific jobs and lpn and rn for theirs. i think lpn and rn's go to school with intese training and are given a license for a reason but employers are getting away with by hiring ma's for cheaper and do everything we were training so hard for...now when things go bad... we are liable! one of the reasons i left med. asst. which was only 8 month training for me and that was when i went to high school so i can have a better pay job, i was able to do injections, diabetic ed., triage, wound care, phlebotomy, etc. it was great until employers started to demand more of me as a nurse. when i finally stood up and said no way... i was no longer able to find a good job. now i went to school for lpn but i am concern with once i start working will all my experience be taken in cosideration salary wise. i mean i was m.a. with lots of experience but when you apply as lpn or rn it seems like anything below that does not count??!!! any comments?!!! :uhoh21:
    hi narcan,

    i can only speak for myself : i was a cma for 5 years before i became an lpn. my rate of pay went up tremendously and i also bartered for it with my experience in the working environment. ii started @$3.45/hr as cma and ended up with $14.72/hr. my last wage was &17.50/hr as lpn. an rn gave me a great idea near review time. to go into the review with paper in hand showing all the acheivments i had made that year, weather otj trainng, patient acuity, time mangment, problem solving, anything to show i was a team player and i expected an increase. if my immediate super didn't get it , i just made an appt with her sup and the same piece of paper. usualy came out with a $1 or more raise. after all we are doing the wwork right? just a thought.
  13. by   ebear
    Orion50,
    Thank you for insightful posts!
    ebear
    Last edit by ebear on Oct 17, '07 : Reason: delted per poster

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MA's being used as "nurses"