BSN vs. RN Salary - page 5

by busylizzy 194,859 Views | 67 Comments

Hi! I got a lot of information about RN salaries from another thread. What it seems to be, is that around the Bham area, starting salaries are at about $18/hr. My question is, to any of you that know, or any of you that are... Read More


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    wether they pay BSN more or less than Associate RN's, it's ok, because currently more hospitals and nursing homes, including other facilities have been pushing for hiring RN, BSN only
    stash11 likes this.
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    Unless I am mistaken Magnet hospitals only hire BSN. I know in the VA health system they will hire ADN, but you cannot progress past Level 1 nurse. I feel it is only a matter of time before a BSN will be required. If not for employment, but must be obtained within a certain timeframe after being hired.
    bamagirl14 likes this.
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    I am a BSN student, and whilst I agree that an Associates is a degree all be it a lessor one, it would not be true to say that this is how it is done in other countries. I noticed a few posts saying that an Associates degree can get you work in other countries. This is not true most other countries do not recognize and AD RN. For example unless you have a Bachelors degree you can not work as a Nurse in Australia and the UK. So if you think you can go to the UK and Australia with an associates degree guess again.

    The standards are also starting to change here in the USA, the only reason they have allowed the Associates degree nurses to get in is because they have a shortage. Now do not get me wrong I know a nurse once they sit the boards is a nurse but there is a lot to be said for the extra course work the standard of class work and the extra clinical work required for a BSN, I know people taking there AD at a local community college and there pre req classes are a lot easier than the ones we had to take. Some class do not even have tests like we do at University. I have asked them basic questions about a topic they should understand and they do not have a clue.
    I called a major hospital in St louis discussed employment when I finished my degree and they assure me they prefer BSN degree students.

    Now it comes down to this how long do you want to be in school where do you want to work and how far do you thing and Associates degree will get you if you are looking to be more than a floor Nurse. End of the day we should all be in it to help people
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    I have seen it anywhere from the same pay to about a dollar an hour. I look at BSN's obtained for growth in your education and maybe even going further with it.
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    I also agree with the above, as some companies will only hire BSN or above for management.
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    I would suggest all nurses obtain a BSN sooner than later. I have never seen where more education held someone back. As the national nursing shortage is eleviated employers will place more emphasis on education. Having a BSN can only help you in the long run.
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    ***FROM A 2 YEAR NURSE WHO JUST GOT HIRED INTO A MAGNET HOSPITAL OVER 18 BSNs ***

    As a new graduate nurse from with an associate degree I MUST respond in kind to the above statements. I was selected from an applicant pool of nearly 25 new nurses to work at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee. This hospital is the PREMIER teaching hospital associated with Medical College of Wisconsin, and largest magnet institution in WI. I also was a new-hire, meaning I had never worked or had classes there while in nursing school. I WAS SELECTED OVER 18 OTHER NEW RN GRADUATES WITH A BSN DEGREE. Why? I was told I had more desirable characteristics outside my degree aka personality, references, background, etc. This is not to say I am not pursuing my BSN (I currently am enrolled in RN-BSN program after just graduating 2 months ago!) but there is much more than a simple degree that gets your foot in the door. Don't always assume a 4-year nursing degree grad is sharper than a 2-year, as our college has some of the higher NCLEX pass rates over 4 year schools, and we have more clinical time, and this was reflected. Also, I have $0 in school loans or debt and am getting Froedtert pays me to get my BSN! According to Nathan King, some ADNS did not appear as "smart" etc. etc. but who is the smarter one to use their employer to cover their 4 year degree with NO DEBTS?
    alblove and mznelly like this.
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    "In Dream84" I did not imply all schools or all students I stated the people I new. As for debt I already work for the hospital in the emergency room as an ER tech so the hospital will pick up the bill for my program as well so guess what no debt either. As for BSN's why does the data prove that hospitals with more BSN's have lower mortality rates than those staffed with more Associate RN's also why is there a bill being pushed through the senate to require all hospitals to have a minimum of 1 in 10 BSN to RN and some hospitals requiring a 1 in 5 ratio.
    I am happy you where successful over the other nurses, I agree it is more than a Lic and a degree that gets you a management job, but in the end statistics show and prove the majority of upper management positions are held by four year degree students over two year degree students. Also statistics prove that more students with four year degrees succeed in greater numbers when seeking advanced degrees over those with associates. It is not about smarter or better when it comes to facts.
    At the end of the day people have choices, if you want to be a floor nurse and thats it well RN with associates is it, if you want to have a better shot at management and advancement you are statistically better off getting a BSN. Or people can try without it and they may or may not get the same shot as you did.
    If you want to go over seas good luck (that was the original question in the post)
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    Quote from indreams84
    ***FROM A 2 YEAR NURSE WHO JUST GOT HIRED INTO A MAGNET HOSPITAL OVER 18 BSNs ***

    As a new graduate nurse from with an associate degree I MUST respond in kind to the above statements. I was selected from an applicant pool of nearly 25 new nurses to work at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee. This hospital is the PREMIER teaching hospital associated with Medical College of Wisconsin, and largest magnet institution in WI. I also was a new-hire, meaning I had never worked or had classes there while in nursing school. I WAS SELECTED OVER 18 OTHER NEW RN GRADUATES WITH A BSN DEGREE. Why? I was told I had more desirable characteristics outside my degree aka personality, references, background, etc. This is not to say I am not pursuing my BSN (I currently am enrolled in RN-BSN program after just graduating 2 months ago!) but there is much more than a simple degree that gets your foot in the door. Don't always assume a 4-year nursing degree grad is sharper than a 2-year, as our college has some of the higher NCLEX pass rates over 4 year schools, and we have more clinical time, and this was reflected. Also, I have $0 in school loans or debt and am getting Froedtert pays me to get my BSN! According to Nathan King, some ADNS did not appear as "smart" etc. etc. but who is the smarter one to use their employer to cover their 4 year degree with NO DEBTS?
    There are many things HR looks at when evaluating potential new hires. Not only do they look at ADN vs. BSN, they also look at what program you graduated from. Some have better reputations than others. They pay attention to how you are dressed during your interview, how you answer their questions, what questions you ask of them, and yes, they pay attention to the applicants race and gender. Right now males have an advantage, with everything else being equal. This even applies to acceptance into nursing programs. I know this because one of my male classmates was accepted with no previous college classes. He was accepted while taking the required math to enter and and the prerequisite biology at another college. If he had not passed either of these he would not have been elgible to enter the program.

    Perhaps you were hired over the BSN applicants because you interviewed much better than they did.

    Congrats on your employment!
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    NightAngelle sums it up perfectly. It should be noted that this thread has been going on for several years now, and during a time where the Nursing profession is changing, while traditionally ADN vs BSN made very little difference, nursing is moving toward a "higher end profession" then it has ever been before, NP's with MSN's or DNP's are becoming highly desired and more and more hospitals are only hiring BSN degrees. While there may not be much difference for a staff nurse with a ADN vs BSN, the general shift in nursing is moving toward higher education and higher responsibilities. Most of the "ADN is all you need" responses are coming from career nurses who already have been in the field for many years, and while experience is always valued above education and these nurses have no worries about their place, the future of nursing will require higher level degrees.


    Quote from NightAngelle
    I'm gonna take heat for this post...but it is all good...

    I've been an ADN for eleven years. I've seen the threads on allnurses.com for years debating the validity of ADN vs. BSN. And for a long time, I've sided with the ADNs regarding "What's a BSN got to do with it?" Trust me, I shared that frustration.

    I am enrolled in a RN-BSN program at Auburn University-Montgomery. The three semester program has a cute nickname..."Perspective Transformation Journey." And perspective changing it has been. Earlier, a poster mentioned that other "professions" require at best, a Bachelor's degree for entry level practice. That being said, in order to be taken seriously as a profession, we need to up the ante on our educational requirements to gain that said respect. It has nothing to do with "I've been a manager with my Associate's degree, and that's where I'm gonna stick it" mentality, or "I know LPNs that run circles around some of the RNs on our unit." Although this may be true, it does not hold weight for us as a PROFESSION.

    My professor made a profound statement in class one day.."Anyone can train a monkey to be a nurse. But monkeys do not have multiple level critical thinking skils." Now, that being said, I reiterate I've been an ADN for eleven years. I am highly intelligent, and very technically sound, and can see sh*t hitting the fan hours before it comes (intuition). However, in just ONE SEMESTER, my horizons have been broadened. Just what does it mean to be a "nurse"? Most people describe us as "caring, compassionate, devoted, loving, blah, blah blah...". But who ever describes a nurse CONSISTENTLY as SMART, EDUCATED, etc...and why is it that when we show promise to people like our patients, they ask us why we didn't go to MEDICAL school??? One day, when we gain respect as a profession, our patients will say..."Wow..you are something else. NO WONDER YOU BECAME A NURSE."

    The professional nurse does more than manage and think critically. He/she gives back to their community, they teach, they participate in forward moving legislation for our field, they contribute to evidence-based research, they participate ACTIVELY in their professional organizations, and they think OUTSIDE the box. If you are happy with being an ADN, and the shoe fits, by all means wear it. I've worn those shoes for ELEVEN YEARS. But I pat myself on the back for being open-minded and giving myself a chance to be a more well-rounded nurse who wants to be taken as seriously as she takes herself.

    Check out the BSN in 10 initiative. Google it. People, there is a reason the Magnet movement exists. And it ain't all about YOU. It's about nursing- as a profession! When we stop looking at the BSN as a stepping stone to advanced practice nursing, and more like progression of our profession, our pay rates will change, our level or respect will change, we will get the legislation we need to end the nursing shortage, and maybe, just MAYBE, those little "naughty nurse outfits" will slowly fade into oblivion because we will be taken MORE SERIOUSLY!!
    bamagirl14 and bamaRN08 like this.


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