California new grad RN planning to work in Australia - page 4

by Saint637

12,928 Views | 37 Comments

Hello all, I plan to move to Australia and work for maybe 1-2 years, the reason is because as a new grad I can not find any jobs here in California (they want experienced nurses) unfortunately it is very competitive for new... Read More


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    Hi, I am in a similar situation. I am from the US and I will be graduating in May as an RN and I would like to move for a couple years, possibly permanently out to Brisbane, and was wondering if, like asked above, if a bachelors degree is required or if just being a licensed RN is acceptable? I understand that experience is helpful in the process, but i really didnt want to have to wait another year to move. I have contacted a couple local hospitals and agencies for more info, but am still waiting on replies...
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    Quote from ceridwyn
    I have thought long and hard about answering this post........and feel I need to say something about the service that Australian nurses in the past have afforded US citizens and how their expertise and experience clearly was considered......

    As Australia and the UK, Canada appeciate and take into consideration nursing expertise and experience, whether it be in New York or Timbuktu....... I was wondering why nursing in Australia is not considered as nursing experience by American hospitals and perhaps as you put it a'bit of fun''

    My grandmother was a nurse during, W11 and nursed many injured US soldiers, that were brought to Australian hospitals, my mother was a civilian nurse in Vietnam and many of her patients were US soldiers as there were no other nurses around, my cousin was a nursing officer in the Australian navy during the gulf conflict looking after US soldiers, wonder if their nursing expertise and experience would be considered of any value or a bit of fun, in the US mainland hospitals, in their time!
    Perhaps nursing everywhere can be a bit parochial - unfortunately

    I've seen Australian nurse managers, with no more education than a nursing certificate, dismiss first rate US nursing education and experience (because it's not 'local').
    However that shouldn't put US nurses off. I would advise them to make multiple applications - they will find a more open minded manager sooner or later
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    Know this post is originally from a while back but I'm curious if you ever ended up moving to Australia to work? I graduated in California and had a difficult time finding work so I moved to North Dakota for an RN poisition. I maintain my CA license but I've been contemplating after a year of experience moving to Australia to work for a year or two. Just curious how your experience of transfering might have gone?
    pnut8377 likes this.
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    Quote from TalleRN
    Know this post is originally from a while back but I'm curious if you ever ended up moving to Australia to work? I graduated in California and had a difficult time finding work so I moved to North Dakota for an RN poisition. I maintain my CA license but I've been contemplating after a year of experience moving to Australia to work for a year or two. Just curious how your experience of transfering might have gone?
    Yes I was wondering the same, I am just beginning nursing school but want to travel after a few years and would love to hear your experience!
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    Were you able to get any replies from hospitals in Australia? I graduate in April 2014 and was considering going overseas to Australia as well.
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    I think you need experience at home first, too many differences here for you, with no experience, meds, drs oders, spelling, all different no specialtist nurses for IV,s, etc an Australian RN is expected to do it all, in most places. From showering, cleaning up after no 1's annd 2's to mixing antis and giving IV.

    Along with that, agencies for legal reasons cannot offer you work as a new grad, and hospitals and nursing home are now inundated with applications - no nursing shortage at the moment for generalists would be hesitant to employ someone with no experience and not familiar with aged care funding instrument and meds.
    At this time of they year Australian new grads are finishing uni and are looking for work, and many find themselves unemployed for the next year and some beyond.
    Last edit by ceridwyn on Oct 18, '13
    tsipareht likes this.
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    Just wondering why I am reading that so many Filipino nurses are receiving work in Australia? Was there a shortage at one point like how there was one in the U.S. years ago?
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    They were, now not. New grads are not getting a look in and many are not getting approval from AHPRA without 3 months experience, Just like any nationality that requires sponsorship to work and now these visa's are getting much tougher to obtain, as local nurses and graduates cannot find work.

    No one ever comes back and reports not having any work/ perhaps one or two that are looking 1 month on having registration, but no one ever posts that they cannot find work. However countries that are given holiday working visa's have very much presence in city hospitals.
    However if anyone has experience in theatre, anaesthetics, you will most likely find work, sponsor etc. as this is about the only area with a shortage and this is were many Filipino nurses do the free volunteering and can claim experience in this area.

    I believe the national board is also going to get a bit tougher on all overseas education institutions ie: must be Australian university standards and be more careful re real documents right person, so that this may also effect applications.
    Last edit by ceridwyn on Oct 18, '13
    Fiona59 likes this.


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