How to protect self from needles? - page 2

by brian Admin

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Sticking self with a needle can be a scary thing. What do you do to protect yourself from this happening? Please share any tips, experiences, etc with our new nurses. Click Like if you enjoyed it. Please share this... Read More


  1. 0
    How about: pay attention to what you're doing? 15 years and never once stuck myself with a needle. Sure, accidents happen ... I have hit my thumb with a hammer, but only once and never again!
  2. 0
    Quote from Biffbradford
    How about: pay attention to what you're doing? 15 years and never once stuck myself with a needle. Sure, accidents happen ... I have hit my thumb with a hammer, but only once and never again!
    Trust me I pay attention and yet got stuck with a HCV+ pt needle. I was taking bloods and she thought I was out and she moved. Right through my finger. 6 months of stress all because the pt assumed I had withdrawn completely from her vein and moved.
  3. 0
    Quote from mt1640
    I have questions and concerns regarding needlesticks as well.

    I had my first accidental needlestick last week. As I was dropping the needle and cap into the sharps container post safely administered heparin injection, I felt a stick and realized I had stuck myself. I was in total shock and felt so embarrassed. I followed universal protocol 1. told my charge RN 2. went to ED for testing 3. all tests were negative on me and patient (Thank God).

    As soon as I told my charge RN she rolled her eyes and said "Did you recap the needle??! Did you? You did, well that's a medication error! You never recap needles that's the first thing you learn in school!! Yup, that's a med error!" She seemed super annoyed that she had to fill out all the paperwork and call the supervisor.

    I said, "I don't know..I don't know. I felt a stick as I was dropping it." It was a 1am heparin injection, and I was tired and hadn't had a moment to take a break. She kept drilling me and finally I said. "I don't know, maybe I did recap it! I don't know, I'm in shock at the moment."

    Does anyone know if a needlestick is can be considered a med error or only an accidental injury. Now my nurse manager wants to meet with both of us next week, and I'm very concerned I'm going to get written up. Thoughts, advice? Thanks. I've been a RN for exactly one year this week.
    Don't beat yourself up. Your supervisor is ignorant. I have been a nurse for 36 years. I stuck myself with a needle contaminated with Hep B+ in the 70's. Got sick. It was bad. But, it was a combative patient. It was an accident. I wasn't careless. I was dealing what I had to work with. And, if you can't remember if you recapped then you are dealing with what you had to work with: exhaustion. They work us like dogs. And, then wonder why we can't be perfect, work harder, work faster. It's been this way for years. Hold your head up. You are in the hardest profession there is. Be proud.

    No One Can Make You Feel Inferior Without Your Consent. (Eleanor Roosevelt)
  4. 1
    First of all, no, you did not commit a medication error, you suffered a worksite injury. Second, what happened is not a measure of your decency as a human being or you skill as a nurse. You had an accident. It happens. The work that we do brings us in close contact with sick people and requires that we handle sharp objects. That is a dangerous mix, but it cannot be avoided; it is one of the occupational hazards that we have to face, and usually face very skillfully. But we are people, not angels, and people are not perfect, so we have accidents sometimes.

    If my tone sounds angry, I apologize. No, on second thought, I do not apologize for being angry. I am not angry at you, I am angry at your supervisor. It is so maddeningly typical of nurses to see a colleague who is hurting and scared, and respond by blaming HER for not being a good enough nurse! We do not treat our patients so cruelly; why are we often so cruel to each other?
    Last edit by CountyRat on May 1, '13 : Reason: Paragraph spacing
    AJPV likes this.
  5. 0
    nice topic. just try to be more careful and alert all the time
  6. 0
    Sometimes nurses forget what they were thought in school about compassion, empathy, sympathy, and most of all, stand up for our own kind. They have been nurses for too long building up a hardness and lack of caring. Sometimes they need to be reminded of why they became nurses in the first place! I did the same thing in a similar situation. I am a LPN in a nursing home where we have to participate every week in the lab to help draw blood. A patient moved while in the middle of lab draw and wound up sticking myself. Same thing.....followed protocol and got lectured on how stupid I was sticking myself, I stopped the RN charge and reminded her that even though she was my superior continuing to talk to me in that manor was hazardous to her health! Also reminded her that she needed to recall a memory of when she were anew, the stupid yet careless things that she did in periods of her career. That stopped her dead in her tracks and made her think! A year later, she and I are greatest of friends!

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
  7. 0
    Quote from clmafm05
    Sometimes nurses forget what they were thought in school about compassion, empathy, sympathy, and most of all, stand up for our own kind. They have been nurses for too long building up a hardness and lack of caring. Sometimes they need to be reminded of why they became nurses in the first place! I did the same thing in a similar situation. I am a LPN in a nursing home where we have to participate every week in the lab to help draw blood. A patient moved while in the middle of lab draw and wound up sticking myself. Same thing.....followed protocol and got lectured on how stupid I was sticking myself, I stopped the RN charge and reminded her that even though she was my superior continuing to talk to me in that manor was hazardous to her health! Also reminded her that she needed to recall a memory of when she were anew, the stupid yet careless things that she did in periods of her career. That stopped her dead in her tracks and made her think! A year later, she and I are greatest of friends!

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    that just means that you both listened to each other that time. thats so nice knowing you became friends
  8. 0
    I am absolutely uplifted and encouraged by reading these positive responses by seasoned, intelligent, helpful nurses! I totally agree with their responses.... Accidents happen! Learn and move on!
  9. 0
    a needlestick isn't a medication error. Its not as though you gave the medication after you stuck yourself...that's a)an error and b) an assault on the patient using your blood as the weapon. You should actually report her for harassing you about following procedure. You have rights, and by trying to blame you for the stick, she was trying to deny you your rights. Protect yourself, know your rights as an employee Ps...we all stick ourselves at some point, its inevitable, just be thankful that the patient was clean .
  10. 0
    the use of safety needles (w/caps) must be implemented and if not, nurses can request for it..


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