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Your advice sought plz

Psychiatric   (797 Views 2 Comments)
by RPN wannabee RPN wannabee (New Member) New Member

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Hi all -

I've been considering my career direction for the past year or so. After lots of research and thinking time, I decided that Psych Nursing would be a good move for me. Too many reasons to detail in depth here but it fits well with what I'm seeking. Moving from a business management environment, with lots of people focus and HR orientated activity, to a direct RPN role. Current negatives are lack of career opportunity where I am, high risk of short term work, periods of downtime and loss of earning potential, and some deep rooted cynicism about the work I have been doing and the people I do it for (seems pointless, ungrateful employers, etc). I'd like to enter a profession, where I'm qualified to do a specific, high demand, people orientated role. Would like to see the results of my efforts, in a team environment, and have longer term career and personal development opportunities. Union employment and good benefits are important as well as a decent living wage with good progression over the first few years.

My question is this.....to complete the training I need to borrow 2x my gross starting salary. This is due to my personal circumstances. I'm not doubting the value of this amount versus the return I would get, but in real dollars it seems a lot of money, yet as far as the debt being two years of my starting gross salary, it doesn't seem much for what could be a 20-25 year new career.

Ideas, input, and advice from anyone who's been in a similar situation would be very much appreciated. I'm in BC, Canada.

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26 Posts; 2,155 Profile Views

I've been considering my career direction for the past year or so. After lots of research and thinking time, I decided that Psych Nursing would be a good move for me. Too many reasons to detail in depth here but it fits well with what I'm seeking. Moving from a business management environment, with lots of people focus and HR orientated activity, to a direct RPN role. Current negatives are lack of career opportunity where I am, high risk of short term work, periods of downtime and loss of earning potential, and some deep rooted cynicism about the work I have been doing and the people I do it for (seems pointless, ungrateful employers, etc). I'd like to enter a profession, where I'm qualified to do a specific, high demand, people orientated role. Would like to see the results of my efforts, in a team environment, and have longer term career and personal development opportunities. Union employment and good benefits are important as well as a decent living wage with good progression over the first few years.

My question is this.....to complete the training I need to borrow 2x my gross starting salary. This is due to my personal circumstances. I'm not doubting the value of this amount versus the return I would get, but in real dollars it seems a lot of money, yet as far as the debt being two years of my starting gross salary, it doesn't seem much for what could be a 20-25 year new career.

Ideas, input, and advice from anyone who's been in a similar situation would be very much appreciated. I'm in BC, Canada.

I did something along the same lines, borrowing 1/2 the cost of my 4yr program in student loans, the other half from myself through the Lifelong Learning Plan ie I borrowed from my own RRSP.

Put things in perspective. Examine your immediate financial needs and the prospects if you continue with things the way they are. I felt I could do better and the investment in myself would be worthwhile. Strictly from an improved sense of self-worth it has been priceless.

It is not without its negatives. You mention a creeping feeling of cynicism. You may find that feeling will not leave when you switch careers. Two words: frequent fliers. The people who, no matter how well you do your job, how much you care, how hard you try, these are people who will not perceptibly improve. Personality disorders are particularly challenging in this respect. Search the forum for discussions on that subject.

And the people you work for may or may not seem to care. I think that phenomenon applies to many work settings. Even caring professions. Hospitals and health authorities are businesses with budgets and bottom lines, like any other business. They're not in business to make a profit, but everything else goes as far as I've seen from my own experiences.

Let me try and strike the balance. Helping someone through an acute, or chronic period of mental health challenge will leave you with a pretty good feeling about yourself. Most of the time. Did that help?

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