Start Flight Nursing October 4th...

Specialties Flight

Published

I just got accepted in to our flight program and am very excited I have over 6 years of ER experience and 2 and a half years of ICU experience. I am trying my best not to get stressed out or nervous about the whole thing as I just put in my two weeks notice in the ICU. Was a wonderful unit to work in it is always hard to leave something that you are comfortable at for something that you have strived so hard to do or be. Just curious as to any suggestions or comments from any of the seasoned flight nurses out there; like what is the best way to approach the new challenges; what does it take to be an exceptional flight nurse; what are some of the things to avoid... Any subtle hints or defined processes would be of great help... Basically I would just enjoy hearing from some other flight nurses and hear about when they first started, their trials and tribulations... :)

qanik

49 Posts

I just got accepted in to our flight program and am very excited I have over 6 years of ER experience and 2 and a half years of ICU experience. I am trying my best not to get stressed out or nervous about the whole thing as I just put in my two weeks notice in the ICU. Was a wonderful unit to work in it is always hard to leave something that you are comfortable at for something that you have strived so hard to do or be. Just curious as to any suggestions or comments from any of the seasoned flight nurses out there; like what is the best way to approach the new challenges; what does it take to be an exceptional flight nurse; what are some of the things to avoid... Any subtle hints or defined processes would be of great help... Basically I would just enjoy hearing from some other flight nurses and hear about when they first started, their trials and tribulations... :)
First let me say congrats. It sounds like you have a great background to start with. It seems if I think back over the years there always seems to be two kinds of orientees. The first is a "knows it all" and is trying to prove it to everyone. The second type is the hungry, I will do what it takes to become a good flight nurse/medic. Remember almost all the flight crews out there are type A people. Most have been doing it awhile and know quite a bit about the field. The wrong way to start is by trying to impress them. Look, they all know your background by now and have decided to hire you, so they already are showing confidence in you. Nothing really prepares you for the flight environment. There is so much to learn. Remember safety is always first regardless of what else is going on. Take a long look at your orientation. I have seen some that are mostly self driven type modules and others that are very specific you do this today and that tommorow. Both approaches can work fine. Identify where your weakness will be (have not done high risk OB, or not real comfortable with IABP, or not familiar being out on a scene) and let your preceptor know this. One of the biggest challenges I have noticed being a preceptor,is the orientee being able to start working with your team member and being able to function autonomously. Most can identify when someone needs to be intubated, but now you have to say OK we are going to do it because it needs to be done and proceed to do it. There is no MD writing you an order. It takes awhile to get comfortable doing this. If I could sum up some tid bits for you it would be this:

Remember some people just aren't very nice to new people and don't take it to heart, it is thier problem not yours

Come in with a positive attitude.

Don't act like you know it all.

DO NOT be afraid of saying you don't know something.

Show the crews you will go the extra step- go on that late call with the oncomming crew, attend classes on your own, study on your own, get involved with the commitee work etc.

Remember it is more like an EMS job- you will get out late some days/nights

Show up early. If your shift starts at 07:00 be there by 06:30 when you arrive 5 minutes prior to the shift and you see the helicopter flying away, someone is stuck on a late flight and now you get to sit around and twittle your thumbs, and when they get back two hours later- there not going to be happy.

Equipment- check it every day- ALL OF IT! make sure you know how it all operates.

Take some pride in your aircraft- CLEAN it after every flight

I hope this helps some. Again congrats and welcome to a great field.

Qanik

kmitch99

2 Posts

Great advice for even well seasoned vets!!! I have been flying for 6 months and have a long nursing history (20 years ED and ICU) and the best advice I can give you is to take it one flight at a time. You are a good nurse with great knowledge the big change is learning to trust yourself and your partner. Concentrate on one bag at a time, if you take a "house" bag out of your ship with every patient focus on that first, check it every flight, I kept a list in my flight suit for the first month. Learn your treatment protocols they are the rules you live by, this should be a first focus. Dont let mistakes make you crazy!!! After each flight discuss it with your partner, look at the choices you made and why, what should you have done or not done during the flight. Know that some days even climbing in the aircraft and getting the door secured is a major accomplishment.

TI2Grr

6 Posts

Thanks for the encouragement, my last day in the ICU was today. Kind of sad to be honest with you, it is a group of people whom I will cherish and miss deeply, but they are also a very understanding unit and are happy for me as well. I am at the nervous point now, my orientation begins on Monday the 4th, I am just planning on being a sponge and as I have always learned about nursing you can never know everything, but you will quite frequently find someone who can help you find the information or give you the answer or assistance. I just hope my bucket of knowledge is big enough to handle it all... Anyhow thanks again for the encouraging words, and I will try and post later on the process of the orientation and maybe look for new questions to ask as I progress...

:coollook:

JohnnyGage

141 Posts

Congrats! As for this...

what are some of the things to avoid

I have two words: Rotor Blades.

This topic is now closed to further replies.

By using the site, you agree with our Policies. X