Risk for falls related to...

Posted
by kcolli45 kcolli45 (New) New

Hello all,

I am working on my nursing diagnoses for a patient that I had. One of my diagnoses is risk for falls. Although, I am not sure what to put for my related to statement. The patient was kind of all over the place with pneumonia, a possible UTI due to a foley catheter and a COPD exacerbation along with an extensive medical history. So, for my related to statement I was going to put "risk for falls related to physiologic state" He had a foley catheter, he was connected to oxygen, needed assistance of one plus the use of a walker to ambulate and had a rather low BP (92/62). So again I am not exactly sure what would be acceptable for me to put as my related to statement since it is related to so many things. Any suggestions would help.

Thank you!

LTC_LPN2

LTC_LPN2

10 Posts

You should really learn how to do them by having your work critiqued by an instructor...I used at risk for falls r/t altered Mental status as evidenced by abnormal urinalysis...I was wrong in nursing school but right at work...🤔

mrsboots87

mrsboots87

Specializes in Neuro, Telemetry. Has 7 years experience. 1,761 Posts

You should really learn how to do them by having your work critiqued by an instructor...I used at risk for falls r/t altered Mental status as evidenced by abnormal urinalysis...I was wrong in nursing school but right at work...������

This would have been wrong on a school careplan because it is a "risk", there will be no AEB, only r/t.

OP, if there are multiple reasons for the fall risk, then put the most vital ones down. When someone else reads the careplan they need to know what to look for to be able to intervene. "Physiologic state" is too broad. If they use a walker then they have a mobility issue. Do they have an unsteady gait? That would be from r/t factor. Do they take meds that make them unstable? That would be another. Are they confused? That would be another. Be very specific as to what the major things are that cause the patient to be a risk for falling.

LTC_LPN2

LTC_LPN2

10 Posts

Thanks Mrs. Boots...In Mississippi LPNs can't write care plans. Not sure why we even had to do them in school. I really was confused until I was critiqued so many times the red from her pen had no choice but to stick out at me lol. However, at work while helping the MDS and care plan team I was asked how I'd proceed once I finished RN. A quizzer of sorts I guess. She said it was correct but I don't know how with the AEB on there....thanks for reminding me and I'll ask tomorrow why she allowed AEB. I'm curious now. í ½í¸Š

kcolli45

kcolli45

8 Posts

My work is being critiqued by an instructor. This was an actual patient that I had last week and had to come up with a plan of care to turn in this week. His mental status was not altered as I did a neuro assessment and he was also A&O x 4.

mrsboots87

mrsboots87

Specializes in Neuro, Telemetry. Has 7 years experience. 1,761 Posts

Thanks Mrs. Boots...In Mississippi LPNs can't write care plans. Not sure why we even had to do them in school. I really was confused until I was critiqued so many times the red from her pen had no choice but to stick out at me lol. However, at work while helping the MDS and care plan team I was asked how I'd proceed once I finished RN. A quizzer of sorts I guess. She said it was correct but I don't know how with the AEB on there....thanks for reminding me and I'll ask tomorrow why she allowed AEB. I'm curious now. ������

I have seen "AEB" on "risk for" diagnoses before too. Just not in school. Typical difference between school and real life nursing as usual. Lol.