Direct Entry Interviews

  1. I have an upcoming interview for a direct entry Acute Care Nurse Practitioner program in Chicago.

    What I am looking for is some advice about the interview and what they might be looking for, and more specifically how to prepare.

    I have answered the "why do you want to be a nurse" question in my personal statement and on here. I can handle that question. But I don't know what else they might ask, or the best way to prepare.

    There are reams of books written about med school interviews, but I haven't found any on advanced practice nurse interviews.
  2. Visit mvanz9999 profile page

    About mvanz9999

    Joined: Sep '06; Posts: 535; Likes: 50
    RN ICU
    Specialty: Accepted...Master's Entry Program, 2008!

    5 Comments

  3. by   arciedee
    In trying to think back to my interview... I know the point that seemed to be the "A-ha" moment for me was when I told my interviewer what areas I was interested in pursuing as a nurse. The interviewer told me that what I said made it clear to her that I knew what nurses did. That was important to her.

    In many ways it's also like a job interview: what are your perceived strengths and weaknesses, what can you add to your class, how has your prior experience shaped your outlook on the nursing field, what do you hope to do with your new education, etc.

    Congratulations on your interview!
  4. by   BerkeleyMom
    Hey mvanz, congrats on getting an interview!

    I just had an interview, and early admit, for a direct entry program. The interview procress that I went though was a bit unique, we were in a group, but I got a good sense of what they are looking for.

    Of course it is a good idea to think about questions and answers pertaining to your chosen specialty, why it is a good match for you, where you see yourself in the near and far future, ect. But, I don't think you should worry about having the perfect answers.

    There is only so much you can prepare yourself because they are mostly just looking at what kind of person you are. They already know a lot about you by your transcripts, resume, and references. Now is their chance to get a look at you, your personality, and your social skills.

    The best thing you can do is go in there with a positive and open-minded attitude. Dress nicely and conservatively, have good posture, smile, make eye-contact, shake hands, speak clearly and slowly. They want students that have more than a stellar application, they want people that are socially competant--not too arrogrant and not too nervous or withdrawn.

    If they ask you a silly question, give them a silly answer. If they ask you a difficult question, take a moment to think about it. It is OK if you don't know an answer, more importantly show them how much you want to go to their school. Don't be afraid to show your true colors, and just be yourself. Remember, they are only human, and we can all spot someone that is acting unnaturally.

    I have a friend that is an HR manager and she said that the most unfavorable quality in an applicant are those that answer the moment she is done asking a question and then just spew forth some "perfect-sounding" contrived answer.

    So rest assured, if you are comfortable in your own skin and can put your nerves aside, you will do great!!! Good luck!
  5. by   arciedee
    Great advice, BerkeleyMom!
  6. by   kangaroo621
    MVanz...

    some questions I got asked at these types of interviews (acute care - direct entry) to keep in mind...

    WHY are you choosing Nurse Practitioner as opposed to Doctor, PA, RN, etc.?

    How do you know you want Acute Care (especially if you have no previous health care experience)?
  7. by   mvanz9999
    Quote from kangaroo621
    MVanz...

    some questions I got asked at these types of interviews (acute care - direct entry) to keep in mind...

    WHY are you choosing Nurse Practitioner as opposed to Doctor, PA, RN, etc.?
    Because I'm interested in patient care, not "disease care". I want to manage the ENTIRE patient and educate them on managing their own illness. Medicine can only do so much, the rest is up to the patient. In my experience, nurses tend to treat the patient, while doctors tend to treat the disease (and yes I know there are exceptions....) Finally, my mother was a nurse for many, many years and I've learned a lot from her.

    As far as the NP part (vs. RN) it would allow me to be able to do more and to have a more direct impact on patient health and patient care.

    Quote from kangaroo621
    How do you know you want Acute Care (especially if you have no previous health care experience)?
    That specialty is where I want to work due to the challenge of managing acutely ill patients. I've volunteered in the ER (and been a patient in one as well). I adapt well to stress, and I feel the technical challenge combined with patient care is where I will excel and find the most challenge.

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