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MSN vs MNA vs MSNA

SRNA   (9,018 Views 3 Comments)
by Hooang Hooang (New Member) New Member

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i am looking into crna programs and have a question about crna programs that are not based out of a university's school of nursing.

let me clarify what i mean. all of the programs i was looking at in my state are based out of nursing schools where you graduate with a masters of science in nursing (nursing anesthesia concentration). so you would take the core nursing master's classes with your anesthesia courses.

however i have found quite a few programs throughout the country that are based out of hospitals that form a partnership with a university where you can get an accredited masters of science in nursing anesthesia. for example the master of nurse anesthesia program from the mayo clinic (http://www.mayo.edu/mshs/na-nmp.html) or the msna program at st. john's health center with the biomedical department of missouri state university (http://www.stjohns.com/schoolofanesthesia/default.aspx). both of these programs are fully accredited by the council on accreditation of nurse anesthesia educational programs. i am not worried about weather or not i can work as a crna afterwards (or at least i do not think i am). they are just based out of different departments other than nursing. i hope that makes sense.

 

i guess i am just wondering if there may be any benefit to having an msn or if there are any differences i should think about. perhaps an msn would be better if someone was thinking about even more education after your master's degree?

 

any thoughts or help would be greatly appreciated.

 

thanks,

anthony

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31 Posts; 1,330 Profile Views

I had the same questions when i started, so maybe I can help you out. There are multiple degrees awarded for differing CRNA programs. So many initials, it gets confusing. The best way to narrow it down is by determining if you have the slightest interest in teaching or continuing your education. From what I can gather there are three types of programs.

1. University based within a school of nursing: MSN

You need this if you are ever planning to obtain a doctorate of nursing, DNP or PhD

2. University based within a school of medicine: MSNA, MSA, etc.

You can still go back and get your DNP, etc with this, but you will have to go back and take all of those MSN nursing core classes.

3. Non university based; Hospital programs: MSA, MSNA, etc.

The most important thing with these programs is to make sure the program is regionally accredited! If not, the degree will not transfer to a university at all. The program may be accredited by the COA/AANA but the degree will not be 'recognized' by a university.

Basically, all the programs = CRNA

Again, it all depends on your goals. I chose the MSN path, because I want to continue my education one day, and like the idea of my program being within a college of nursing. There are some great programs out there in each of these categories, it just depends on what fits you.

Hope this helps

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dfk has 11 years experience as a RN, CRNA and specializes in Critical Care, Emergency.

501 Posts; 6,023 Profile Views

I had the same questions when i started, so maybe I can help you out. There are multiple degrees awarded for differing CRNA programs. So many initials, it gets confusing. The best way to narrow it down is by determining if you have the slightest interest in teaching or continuing your education. From what I can gather there are three types of programs.

1. University based within a school of nursing: MSN

You need this if you are ever planning to obtain a doctorate of nursing, DNP or PhD

2. University based within a school of medicine: MSNA, MSA, etc.

You can still go back and get your DNP, etc with this, but you will have to go back and take all of those MSN nursing core classes.

3. Non university based; Hospital programs: MSA, MSNA, etc.

The most important thing with these programs is to make sure the program is regionally accredited! If not, the degree will not transfer to a university at all. The program may be accredited by the COA/AANA but the degree will not be 'recognized' by a university.

Basically, all the programs = CRNA

Again, it all depends on your goals. I chose the MSN path, because I want to continue my education one day, and like the idea of my program being within a college of nursing. There are some great programs out there in each of these categories, it just depends on what fits you.

Hope this helps

your number one is partially correct. you do not need an MSN to further obtain a PhD. essentially any master's degree will/can get you into PhD program, provided you're a strong candidate.

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