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Labour and delivery practices from around the world

Ob/Gyn   (1,875 Views 8 Comments)
by Sezza83 Sezza83 (New Member) New Member

Sezza83 has 6 years experience .

2,502 Visitors; 65 Posts

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I am a registered nurse & midwife from down under Australia. I would love to live & work overseas for a few years and at the moment I have the usa in my sights. However I am worried that our practices here in Australia are completely different and was wondering if any Australian nurses/midwifes managed move and adapt without to much stress.

Examples of things that we do differently here include (please keep in mind that I work in the public health system):

1. Midwives deliver babies unless its a forceps or csection.

2. Most women never even see a doctor

3. We don't induce mothers unless its medically necessary or they are over 42 weeks.

4. IV's and fluids are not routine

5. Babies don't go to the nursery unless they are really sick or bathed until they are over 24hrs old

6. Mothers & babies are kept together all the times.

I've just noticed from ready the threads on this site that things seem to be very different in America. And as I said I'm just worried that the differences will drive me crazy or will I adapt quickly?

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Sezza83 has 6 years experience.

2,502 Visitors; 65 Posts

Oh sorry about the grammar, I wrote this while multitasking. Got to love my 3yr old and her tantrums!

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Fyreflie has 4 years experience and works as a RN.

4,017 Visitors; 189 Posts

Man I'll trade you!! Canada seems to be inbetween you and the US in terms of intervention and practice and we are both still behind the UK and apparently you guys :) be prepared to change the way you practice, and not necessarily for the better!!

I would suggest being very picky about the hospital you choose to work with--try for baby friendly certified if you can. I would also do some research into the differences in our FHR classifications (I'm in Canada but I think the US one is superior to ours right now).

I'm curious to see what you'll get for answers :)

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eden works as a LDRP.

3,650 Visitors; 238 Posts

I am in Canada

1. Midwives deliver babies unless its a forceps or csection - Here it is up to women whether they want a midwife, GP or OB

2. Most women never even see a doctor- See above

3. We don't induce mothers unless its medically necessary or they are over 42 weeks- Here they will induce after 41+3 unless medically necessary

4. IV's and fluids are not routine- Same here

5. Babies don't go to the nursery unless they are really sick or bathed until they are over 24hrs old- same here and the bath is delayed and is done anytime after 2 hours but before discharge

6. Mothers & babies are kept together all the times- same here

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Sezza83 has 6 years experience.

2,502 Visitors; 65 Posts

Thanks. Sounds like Canada is similar to OZ. I would love to live in Canada to but I've heard it's near impossible to get a visa unless you're under 30 (which I'm 31 :( ). Do you need to be a midwife to work in L&D? You do in Australia.

Was only thinking the USA because Australians can get a E3 visa.

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Fyreflie has 4 years experience and works as a RN.

4,017 Visitors; 189 Posts

Not so hard, commonwealth countries are pretty good to one another. You just need your nursing to do LD here, but we don't deliver (on purpose anyway). My hubby is actually from Melbourne :) good luck whatever you decide!

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eden works as a LDRP.

3,650 Visitors; 238 Posts

I don't know how hard it is to get a visa, it didn't seem too bad for my american friends. You don't need to be a midwife to work in L&D here though the experience will certainly help you get a job in the area. Good luck figuring out where you want to go.

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monkeybug has 15 years experience and works as a home visiting nurse, former L&D nurse.

12,777 Visitors; 716 Posts

I'm in the South in the US, and we are totally on the opposite end of the spectrum. According to a recent report from our BON, there are 17 practicing CNMs in the entire state. In the last hospital I worked, probably 98% of patients got epidurals. Our c section rate was over 30%. Elective inductions are commonplace, although in the last few years the doctors have agreed to wait until 39 weeks for elective inductions. Everyone gets an IV and everyone is NPO x ice chips or popsicles. In other parts of the country it is a bit more earthy birthy, but here the doctor and the medicalization of birth reign supreme.

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