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IV catheter problem

Posted
Zeron Zeron (New) New

I put an iv catheter for two student successfully but when they want to put it for me it was all ok till they put the catheter in my artery i felt dizzy , i just waited if i can be better stay calm but i was going worse and my eyes was going to be black and can't see my whole body sweat , I don't scare from it but this happened to me , what should I do to prevent it from happening again ...

Double-Helix, BSN, RN

Specializes in PICU, Sedation/Radiology, PACU. Has 10 years experience.

First, IV catheters go in veins, not arteries. I hope these students were supervised, because of they did put the IV in an artery, they were not doing it correctly.

Second, what you experienced is called a vaso-vagal reaction. It happens when your sympathetic nervous system responds to a trigger like pain, blood, etc. Your heart rate and blood pressure drop and you feel like you're going to pass out, or even fully faint. For some people, it happens randomly once and then never again. For others (like me), they have similar reactions almost every time they get poked with a needle. You can help prevent it from happening again by laying down with your feet up when the IV is started. Also, making sure you're well hydrated can help too.

Thanks for your information (Double-Helix) it happened to me again at vein puncture just when they push the needle in i feel dizzy and sweat and if i don't lye and feet up definitely faint , Do you think if i go to Psychological doctor may help to overcome it or it's normal that happen ??

Double-Helix, BSN, RN

Specializes in PICU, Sedation/Radiology, PACU. Has 10 years experience.

It's normal, but there is definitely a psychological component that triggers the physiologic reaction. I've never heard of consulting a psychologist, but it's possible they may have some good techniques.

I always find it helpful to first tell the person sticking me that I have had issues before. That prepares everyone and makes me feel less pressure to NOT have a reaction, if that makes sense. Then, during the stick, I ask that they don't tell me what they are doing or when they will stick. I talk about something unrelated and keep talking. The talking keeps me breathing, which helps prevent that kind of vasovagal reaction.