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help requested for prenursing

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Hi I am currently taking pre-req courses at Pasadena city college and i am wondering what is competitive because i want to transfer to another school. what's the difference between the Ati and the Teas? Also would I need to take both? What were your gpa and test scores? Also which schools accept spring transfers? What would you guys consider competitive for the CSU nursing programs.

EmmReeCPT

Has 2 years experience.

The TEAS is administered by ATI, no difference. The only other exam I've seen for nursing in CA is the HESI but it's not as common. I would say competitive TEAS score is >85% and people often take it multiple times BUT be sure to wait a month between tests or you may not be able to submit the second/third score to schools. I took it cold turkey with no studying and got an 85.3 which was more than competitive for my school of choice, so it's not impossible to get a great score with just what PCC has taught you. (I go to Cypress CC)

"Competitive" is at least a 3.5 in sciences and a 3.8 overall GPA for most ASN and BSN programs. They give you minimum GPAs and scores but those are just that, minimums. By no means will a 2.5 GPA and 67 on the TEAS be admitted to almost any program.

Are you looking to transfer to an ASN or BSN program? That matters as far as spring vs fall transfers. Go to the BRN(board of registered nursing) site and find all the nursing schools that you're willing to drive to, ASN and BSN, and check out their class requirements, pass rates, application periods, statistics as far as program and NCLEX pass rates, etc. everybody's different unfortunately. Competitive for CSUs is a 4.0 and a high TEAS score. They do take a range of GPAs but the best bet for university's is a 4.0. I suggest applying everywhere. ASN may not be your first choice but it's better to enter an ASN program(2 years), get it done then enter an RN-BSN program(1-1.5 years) rather than waiting another year to apply and hope to get in(1 year wait + 3 years for program).

I was admitted to Western Governors University with a 3.0 science GPA, 3.4 overall GPA, 85.3% TEAS score. I was told by the nursing director at Cypress that I would be on the waiting list for years and I should try somewhere else so I didn't even apply to my home school. It is possible to get in even if you're a long shot. Some schools are on the lottery system. Some schools purely work by waiting list. Some schools take the most qualified. Some use a combination of all of them.

Best of luck. It is possible. I sat on the Internet for hours checking out all the community colleges in the area making spreadsheets of application dates and program requirements. My stats were not that good and I got in to a university, so there's hope!! I'll be done in 2.5 years with my bachelors.

I am currently looking to transfer to a bsn program. Any recommendations? When you say 4.0 do you mean for both overall and science courses?

EmmReeCPT

Has 2 years experience.

I am currently looking to transfer to a bsn program. Any recommendations? When you say 4.0 do you mean for both overall and science courses?

Unfortunately, yes. 4.0 overall is best and almost guaranteed admission. If anything, at least a 4.0 in sciences because most programs count science and overall GPA separately. Obviously, a 4.0 overall is impossible without a 4.0 in sciences. Some people make school their "job", so they're able to devote all their time to it unlike most of the student population who work at least part time, if not full time.

I know you want a BSN straight off the bat. Everyone does, including me. I was heartbroken to only be admitted to psychology programs as a senior in high school and had to deny them and go to a junior college because nursing is (soon to be) my passion. Had I known what I do now, I would've gotten a BSN in psychology and done an ABSN program and had a double bachelors. You live and you learn, unfortunately.

Don't be afraid to at least explore ASN programs because you never know what happens. In my opinion and experience, it's better to start an ASN program now rather than wait an additional year for CSU applications and wait for the "specialized nursing" application period as well. Those both also have their own application deadline and fees$$$. Be wary though, from what I've heard, private schools(ACC, WCU) are never worth it, in terms of cost, education and job prospects even though they're typically quicker and have the most lenient application requirements. Any school that doesn't accept credit transfers is typically a shady, for profit school.

ASN is cheaper and often has better professors and experiences than universities(from what I've heard). RN-BSN programs are more than readily available both online and at CSUs/UCs, so don't worry about that if/when the time comes if that's your main holdup. Most hospitals require a BSN nowadays so it's pretty commonplace for ASN students to go directly into a BSN program at a CSU.

There is definitely more than one way to skin a cat, just depends on how long you're willing to wait and how much money you're willing to shell out on just applications.

Whats the specialized nursing application? By ACC and WCU you mean American Career College and West Coast University right? because right now I just don't know which path to take.

EmmReeCPT

Has 2 years experience.

Whats the specialized nursing application? By ACC and WCU you mean American Career College and West Coast University right? because right now I just don't know which path to take.

So what I mean by specialized nursing app, they often have a SON(school of nursing) application in addition to the general application you do. So you're typically "provisionally" accept you since they know you don't want to just go to the university, you just want the nursing program, and then you're asked to apply to the SON so they can look you over then admit/deny you.

I've just heard some pretty mixed reviews about for profit schools, mostly in the negative. They're private and for profit schools. Private is not an issue, (Biola, APU, Loyola Marymount are all private and have great programs) it's the for profit part that's a bit concerning. They just want their money and they'll take advantage of those who are willing to take out 60-130k in loans just to get their nursing degree. They're extremely overpriced and employers will often take most other applicants over the for profit schools applicants due to the quality of the education received. Most private ADN programs are roughly 60k and BSNs are 100-130k. That's insane!! Given the fact that an ADN is less than 10k and BSN less than 50k at universities they're completely taking advantage of the impactment issue at public schools. The other issue is that they often don't accept prereqs from any school but theirs because...that's more money they can charge! Surprise! Obviously form an opinion for yourself. You can find school reviews but they are generally written by those who are frustrated and upset by their experience.

Take everything with a grain of sand and do what you think will work best for you but I do suggest leaning towards the public only side. It may take a year of just applying but I honestly think you get the most bang for your buck, a better education and a better experience overall. For example, if you don't get accepted this year, get some work or volunteer experience in the Healthcare field and then you'll have a much better chance next year. Also, find out what each school wants as far as additional chances. Some give points for nutrition and developmental psych, some require them as a prereq, some could care less if you've taken them.

You might be able to find some former students who went to ACC or WCU and be able to ask them some questions in another forum.

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