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BSN (RN) or MS (NP) - Which should I go for?

Howdy everyone,

I'm not exactly sure where to stick this inquiry, so I might double-post it. Please forgive me in advance.

I'm a second-degree student very interested in becoming a nurse. However, as I learn more about the positions within the field, I find myself wanting to study to be a NP (family or adult care). There are a number of direct-entry accelerated programs that grant you entrance to their grad school so you can pursue the NP specialty after you get your BSN. However, my aunt (a nurse) told me that it would be better to go to an accel BSN program, find a job, and then (hopefully) the workplace will pay for my masters in whatever.

My question(s) are:

1. Is it better to go straight for your MS (if you want to be an NP?) or get the BSN and hope that your job will subsidize the cost of the MS for you? and will jobs pay for you to become an NP? I'd think they'd only cover you if it's for positions they need, and I was under the impression that most hospitals didn't necessarily have a pressing need for NPs?

2. Are there any good NP - direct entry programs anyone's aware of? The main two I know are Northeastern's program and Pace's program.

3. There are a couple of schools I'm interested in applying to with due dates coming up next month. Is it safe to assume that they'll have some slots available? or should I just hold off sending out apps until the fall?

Thanks. I hope my post made a little sense.

mom2michael, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in Rural Health.

The hospital where I work at pays a portion of whatever degree you are wanting to obtain, including a MSN and there are actually very few positions in the hospital that require an NP but several that require the MSN just merely for managment purposes so they are willing to foot a portion of the bill regardless of the actual title you are wanting to obtain. I would call around to some hospitals and get the info though because everyone does it a bit different.

In this area there are no direct entry programs. All of them here require a BSN and a min. 2 years of practice as an RN before acceptance into their program. Most would prefer for 5 years.

We have several NNPs on staff where I work (NICU) and all have told me that if I want to be an NP when I grow up it is better to get the BSN and work for a few years (they've all said at least 5 years) so the confidence level as an RN is there when you start working on the degree and training for NP.

Good luck to you!!!

Howdy everyone,

I'm not exactly sure where to stick this inquiry, so I might double-post it. Please forgive me in advance.

I'm a second-degree student very interested in becoming a nurse. However, as I learn more about the positions within the field, I find myself wanting to study to be a NP (family or adult care). There are a number of direct-entry accelerated programs that grant you entrance to their grad school so you can pursue the NP specialty after you get your BSN. However, my aunt (a nurse) told me that it would be better to go to an accel BSN program, find a job, and then (hopefully) the workplace will pay for my masters in whatever.

My question(s) are:

1. Is it better to go straight for your MS (if you want to be an NP?) or get the BSN and hope that your job will subsidize the cost of the MS for you? and will jobs pay for you to become an NP? I'd think they'd only cover you if it's for positions they need, and I was under the impression that most hospitals didn't necessarily have a pressing need for NPs?

2. Are there any good NP - direct entry programs anyone's aware of? The main two I know are Northeastern's program and Pace's program.

3. There are a couple of schools I'm interested in applying to with due dates coming up next month. Is it safe to assume that they'll have some slots available? or should I just hold off sending out apps until the fall?

Thanks. I hope my post made a little sense.

The direct entry programs I know of for NP's involve getting your RN first in a very accelerated year and then 2 more years for the master's portion for the NP. There are lots of direct entry NP programs. Do a google search for them. Typically, people get their RN the first year and then work part time while they go to school for the master's portion. Alternatively, some people get a BSN/RN the first year (be sure to check which programs offer that option) and then they either defer for a year and work fulltime as a RN and go back for the master's portion for 2 years after that OR they go straight through and work part time after the first year (you cannot work the 1st year because it is so intense). The competition is very steep for these programs, so you need to have a GPA atleast 3.3 to 3.6, GRE scores 600 and above and some direct volunteer or direct paid health care experience. Hope that helps.

Smile123

elizabells, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU.

http://www.allnursingschools.com has a good, simple explanation of the differences btwn programs, and you can search all the schools in the country by program, location, etc. That's where I did all my preliminary research.

Your move, holy man . . . choose wisely!

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