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BiPapp

Hospice   (3,386 Views 5 Comments)
by RNDYN2CU RNDYN2CU (New Member) New Member

RNDYN2CU has 16 years experience and specializes in ICU/CCU, Peds,DD's, Hospice.

1,653 Visitors; 52 Posts

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I admitted a pt from CCU last night to transfer to a snf to live out his days. 72 yr old, he was tired of the Bypapp breather. I felt it in-humane to take it off. It was removed prior to transport. Luckily the MD gave me the comfort meds to assist his transfer. He made it through the night. Any thoughts on this?

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10,851 Visitors; 932 Posts

If its what the patient wanted, why is it inhumane? It would seem inhumane to me to force him to keep wearing it. With roxanol and antianxiety meds to reduce his air hunger and distress, it would be granting him the quality of life HE desires for what time remains to him.

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RNDYN2CU has 16 years experience and specializes in ICU/CCU, Peds,DD's, Hospice.

1,653 Visitors; 52 Posts

If its what the patient wanted, why is it inhumane? It would seem inhumane to me to force him to keep wearing it. With roxanol and antianxiety meds to reduce his air hunger and distress, it would be granting him the quality of life HE desires for what time remains to him.

Thanks Aimee. I had him on Ativan 1mg q 4 with Roxanal 10 mg q 2 and he died peacefully tonight. PEACEFULLY!!! I am so relieved. I reeeeeeeeeeeaaaaally thought he would be a fish out of water, but the meds eased the air hunger and agitation. Sometimes I wonder why we admit someone for 36 hours, and then this: A good death. I am continually sobered by the honor of being a Hospice Nurse.

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10,851 Visitors; 932 Posts

I am so glad to hear he had a good death. Thanks for sharing. Those successes are indeed why we keep coming to work each day.

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RNorBust has 17 years experience and specializes in pedi-onc, Adult Acute care, LTC, more.

1,489 Visitors; 24 Posts

Try to think of it in another context... imagine being a 72 year old man that has lived your life, raised your kids, worked your job, did all that you could do to become who you are, and then you become old and sick and tired. It would be in humane to try to keep it on him if he doesn't want it. It's a primitive right as an adult to make decisions for yourself. You didn't take it off, it was his decision. What we as hospice nurses do is allow patients the right to make decisions and advocate for them when they do...

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