Why Mayo CRNA program is not top rated? - page 2

Mayo Clinic is ranked 2nd best hospital in U.S. and its medical school is ranked 22nd (top 1/8) among 163 medical schools. Its CRNA program rank is much lower, tied at 30th (top 1/3) out of 92... Read More

  1. by   91CRN
    Quote from ether
    The school that I am most interested was SECOND TO LAST on that stupid USnews report. Yet, 100% of graduates from that school consistently pass boards on their first try. In my opinion, whichever school accepts you and whichever school has a higher passing rate on boards is the best school in the country.
    My dear colleague--would you please share with me what school was the subject of your research and save me the trouble? I would like to compile a list of CRNA programs for myself based on good pass rates and then evaluate based on location as I am in the position to move. Thank you in advance for your response.
  2. by   rn29306
    A guy from my class had the same experience as far as being a non-Mayo nurse. When it was obvious that the overwhelming majority of Mayo staff nurses were going to get accepted, he asked a big wig with the interview staff what he could do to strengthen his application status, he received a "Become staff at Mayo" response. These people need pull their heads out of their posteriors and quite wasting applicants travel time and money. While it is probably illegal to state preference for Mayo staff outright in the brouchure, perhaps if they wish to avoid litigation they should keep their mouths shut about preferential selection criteria. While I have certainly never been there, it seems like an academic medical ivory tower that I wouldn't want to attend anyway.
  3. by   Dani989
    As a Mayo Clinic ICU RN I can tell you that the Mayo CRNA program is a very tricky school to get into. Basically you have to come from inside the organization and get the right recommendation from the right doctor in order to get in. The admission committee has even gone so far as to talk to all the nurse managers before accepting applicants. I know that out of a class for 30 or so maybe 5 at the most come from outside the institution. In fact the CV surgical ICU lost ten nurses last year to Mayo's program alone. Maybe that is why Mayo is ranked to so in the US News report.
  4. by   Dani989
    To set the record straight on the lines and regional blocks at Mayo; CRNA's are not allowed to do epidurals. However, I don't think you would find an institution that has more interesting cases. CRNA's do heart, liver transplants on a regular basis. Mayo wants to train CRNA's that will stay and work at Mayo afterward. In fact the will basically pay for your schooling if you agree to work there. That is why they take so many people from inside the institution. I think it is their way of staffing the 200 + OR's.
  5. by   91CRN
    Quote from Dani989
    To set the record straight on the lines and regional blocks at Mayo; CRNA's are not allowed to do epidurals. However, I don't think you would find an institution that has more interesting cases. CRNA's do heart, liver transplants on a regular basis. Mayo wants to train CRNA's that will stay and work at Mayo afterward. In fact the will basically pay for your schooling if you agree to work there. That is why they take so many people from inside the institution. I think it is their way of staffing the 200 + OR's.
    I'm grateful for this information. I will definately NOT be applying there. I understand Mayo's motivation, but applying to, visiting, interviewing--these are all costly endeavors. I agree that Mayo, or indeed any program so internally invested should be more up front about the admission requirements. I don't understand why it's so difficult to get REAL information out of some CRNA programs. I am having a bit of a problem compiling hard data myself. Basically what I've come down to is this. I will apply to as many schools as I can that are, A: Geographically pleasing B: accept ER and PAST ICU experience. C: that I can afford (without becoming their endentured slave when I graduate) D: that I don't have to be a rocket scientist to get into Thanks for sharing.
  6. by   rn29306
    Quote from 91CRN
    I'm grateful for this information. I will definately NOT be applying there. I understand Mayo's motivation, but applying to, visiting, interviewing--these are all costly endeavors. I agree that Mayo, or indeed any program so internally invested should be more up front about the admission requirements. I don't understand why it's so difficult to get REAL information out of some CRNA programs. I am having a bit of a problem compiling hard data myself. Basically what I've come down to is this. I will apply to as many schools as I can that are, A: Geographically pleasing B: accept ER and PAST ICU experience. C: that I can afford (without becoming their endentured slave when I graduate) D: that I don't have to be a rocket scientist to get into Thanks for sharing.
    You left out doing toenailectomies while anesthesia residents are placing lines, Swans, and doing transplant hearts all day.
  7. by   91CRN
    Quote from rn29306
    You left out doing toenailectomies while anesthesia residents are placing lines, Swans, and doing transplant hearts all day.
    Ahh yes, thank you for the addition I'll take one of those and one whose students are well prepared to pass the certifying exam PLEASE.
  8. by   BigDave
    Quote from Brenna's Dad
    I've heard that Mayo is light on regional and light on lines... but this is definetly third party information. I'm sure someone here can set this straight.
    An ex co-worker of mine interviewed there a couple of years ago and actually asked about the lack of central line experience during the interview. They kinda got ticked off at him for asking...he went to a Texas program--since they did not accept him after that!
  9. by   soliant12
    i guy in my program interviewed there and the first thing out of the director's mouth was "if you think you are coming here and going to learn how to place central lines and swans, you are in the wrong place" i would have been gone from that interview before god got the news.
  10. by   Dani989
    Every program offers something different, I guess that pretty much sums up the whole conversation. Mayo is a wonderful place to work and there are many opportunities there that can’t be found anyplace else. With 200 + OR’s there are many interesting cases to choose from (not including toenailecomies). That being said I did not apply to Mayo’s anesthesia program. I have only worked there two year and know that is not enough time to have a shot at getting accepted.
  11. by   toritharn
    As for the ranking system, I am not sure how accurate that is. I interviewed at Mayo in December and was accepted. I am from outside the facility and outside the state, and I guess I got lucky to get in. Most all the other applicants had wonderful experience and most were from the Mayo ICU's. I really enjoyed my interview and the information I received while there. They are open about what there program offers and what it does not. In most facilities as a CRNA, you will not be the one putting in SWANS and centrals, and the variety and scope of cases you are able to be invloved with at Mayo are awesome. Every year in recent past 100% of students passed boards on the first try, and several received a perfect score. the CRNA graduating from Mayo generally have a great reputation and extensive:spin: caseload backround.
    Plus, you can not beat the tuition<10,000, and you receive a stipend also during clinicals. For me, it was a great choice and I feel blessed to be accepted for this fall. I understand that every applicant is looking for different things in a program, but for me I was estatic to get in!
  12. by   91CRN
    Quote from toritharn
    As for the ranking system, I am not sure how accurate that is. I interviewed at Mayo in December and was accepted. I am from outside the facility and outside the state, and I guess I got lucky to get in. Most all the other applicants had wonderful experience and most were from the Mayo ICU's. I really enjoyed my interview and the information I received while there. They are open about what there program offers and what it does not. In most facilities as a CRNA, you will not be the one putting in SWANS and centrals, and the variety and scope of cases you are able to be invloved with at Mayo are awesome. Every year in recent past 100% of students passed boards on the first try, and several received a perfect score. the CRNA graduating from Mayo generally have a great reputation and extensive:spin: caseload backround.
    Plus, you can not beat the tuition<10,000, and you receive a stipend also during clinicals. For me, it was a great choice and I feel blessed to be accepted for this fall. I understand that every applicant is looking for different things in a program, but for me I was estatic to get in!
    Thanks for your input. Do you have to work for Mayo after graduation to get the stipend?
  13. by   toritharn
    No, You Do Not Have To Sign On For Mayo To Receive Stipend. All Students Receive A Small Stipend Of Around $500 A Month During 24 Month Clinical. If You Do Sign On To Work For Mayo, You Can Recieve An Additional $1000 A Month. It Is A Nice Option To Have If You Decide To Stay In The Area.

close