getting into a graduate school

  1. [font='Times New Roman']I am currently a 2nd year student in an associate degree R.N. program. Prior to entry therein, I graduated as a Bachelor of Science - Psychology/History from a state university. I do not anticipate completing a BSN degree unless absolutely necessary. My career goal is research. Is it possible to circumvent a BSN degree and enter a MSN program with research orientation with the educational history thus described? Which schools? Any advice?
    •  
  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   llg
    My advice is to contact schools that are of interest to you and ask about their requirements. I know that is not what you wanted to hear, but that is the only way to get the REAL answer.

    Remember, when you graduate with your ADN, you will have not taken some of the courses usually found in a BSN program -- though some of that will depend upon the particular ADN program you are attending. It's not unreasonable for a school to require those courses before accepting you into a nursing master's program.

    Also, consider that it might not be all that difficult to get BSN because your previous course work will fulfill some of the requirements. You may only have to take a few more courses to get that BSN. You'll never know unless you start asking the schools themselves.

    llg
  4. by   charles-thor
    You must to have a BSN prior to gaining entry into an MSN program. The fastest way for someone with a previous ADN to get into a masters program is to enroll in an RN to MSN program. You shouldn't have too difficult a time locating one. Check out University of Maryland, as they have a plethora of MSN options. Is it safe to assume that your desire to obtain an MSN is to partake in nursing research?
  5. by   elkpark
    There are a few programs (often called "bridge" programs) that take RNs without BSNs (AD or diploma grads). These programs offer a combined BSN/MSN program (takes a little longer than standard MSN). I know that Vanderbilt used to have one, and I've heard casual references to several others but I don't know where they are. Shouldn't be to hard to find out, though (esp. if research is your interest anyway ... )

    There are also programs that take people who aren't nurses, but have a BA or BS degree in something else, and combine basic nursing with an MSN.

    ALL MSN programs offer core courses in statistics and research methods, but I am not aware of any MSNs that offer a "specialization" in research, since the MSN is considered to be a clinical degree. There are MSNs available in nursing administration and nursing education, however, which you may want to investigate if you don't have a clinical specialty you're fired up about.

    When you say "research," do you mean working as an RN in clinical research studies directed by others, do you mean "research" as in researching topics and writing articles/books, or do you want to develop and implement your own clinical research studies? As in nearly every other field, the MSN is not considered a terminal degree, and the doctoral degree is considered the appropriate preparation for the scholar/researcher.

    Best wishes with whatever you decide --
  6. by   dianacs
    Quote from otherside
    [font='Times New Roman']I am currently a 2nd year student in an associate degree R.N. program. Prior to entry therein, I graduated as a Bachelor of Science - Psychology/History from a state university. I do not anticipate completing a BSN degree unless absolutely necessary. My career goal is research. Is it possible to circumvent a BSN degree and enter a MSN program with research orientation with the educational history thus described? Which schools? Any advice?
    The short answer appears to be yes:

    http://www.slu.edu/colleges/NR/msn_reqs.html

close