Columbia's ETP Program

  1. Can someone please tell me in plain English what is the purpose of this program? For people without a nursing degree to get a graduate degree in nursing with having to do another undergrad?

    Do you have to have work experience?

    Thanks!
    Last edit by niki_m787 on Jan 7, '07
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   Asherah
    FYI, I have not applied to this program for the following term, but have inquired about it in case I need to reapply to programs in 08'.

    The program at Columbia you are inquiring about is what you will see termed on this forum as a "direct-entry" program, similar to what is offered by Yale, Northeastern, UCLA, UCSF and many more. These programs are intended for individuals who are not licensed RNs and have completed a B.A. or B.S. in another field of study.

    Each of these programs requires a few different prerequisites, some require you to be CNA or take a Nursing Fundamentals course (e.g. UCLA), some require GRE scores. I would take a look at each of the program's descriptions and admissions requirements quite carefully.

    In terms of experience, again I can't answer specifically for Columbia. Based on glancing at their program information they don't state that any is required, but I would bank on the fact that most applicants have either had CNA experience or volunteer experience in a health care setting.

    I'm sure another member here who has applied for admission or who is taking part in the program now, will come along and be able to give you more specific information. Good luck!
  4. by   cozzy66
    niki_m787,

    Since it's a direct-entry program, you do not need any work experience to apply. Of course, any health-care exp that you have can only be beneficial. You do earn both a BSN and an MSN, but the BSN takes only 1 year.
    I applied for the upcoming semester, so am just waiting these last few horrible weeks to know their decision!

    Good luck in your search.
  5. by   niki_m787
    Thank You!
  6. by   fluffhead
    I am in the spring term of the ETP program - if you have specific questions, I would be happy to answer them honestly...!
  7. by   ejeruto
    Quote from fluffhead
    I am in the spring term of the ETP program - if you have specific questions, I would be happy to answer them honestly...!
    Thank you so much for offering to help. Well, i am interested in this program. Do you know how competitive it is and perhaps what do you think is the best/most prefered GRE score? With the prerequisites, do they sometimes admit people who have not met all the stated requirements?
    Thanks.
  8. by   HYPEractiveTTU
    Quote from fluffhead
    I am in the spring term of the ETP program - if you have specific questions, I would be happy to answer them honestly...!
    I can't believe it's been a year since I got that acceptance letter... Congratulations to everyone that received their letter. For those that haven't, know that ours was a THIN envelope (I was expecting a packet). So if you get a thin envelope, don't automatically think it's a rejection letter.
  9. by   fluffhead
    I don't know the answers to your specific questions - we don't really get much on the demographics or cutoff numbers for GRE - I know their prereq's are among the least stringent, so you should have completed them by the time you transfer (microbiology, statistics, anatomy and physiology).

    You should be hearing next week - good luck!
  10. by   BerkeleyMom
    Quote from cozzy66
    niki_m787,

    Since it's a direct-entry program, you do not need any work experience to apply. Of course, any health-care exp that you have can only be beneficial. You do earn both a BSN and an MSN, but the BSN takes only 1 year.
    I applied for the upcoming semester, so am just waiting these last few horrible weeks to know their decision!

    Good luck in your search.
    Do you actually earn a BSN in addtion to the MSN? The direct entry program that I am interested in prepares you to take to NCLEX in 15 months, and then you work on the MSN. Even though the courses and clinicals are the same as their BSN program and ABSN program, they do not award you a BSN. Hmmm .... what is the difference? Do some schools have a reason for not awarding a BSN?
  11. by   fluffhead
    :typing
    Quote from BerkeleyMom
    Do you actually earn a BSN in addtion to the MSN? The direct entry program that I am interested in prepares you to take to NCLEX in 15 months, and then you work on the MSN. Even though the courses and clinicals are the same as their BSN program and ABSN program, they do not award you a BSN. Hmmm .... what is the difference? Do some schools have a reason for not awarding a BSN?
    The Columbia program does confer a BSN en route, while similar programs (Yale) do not. Why seems to be up for debate. Incentive to retain students seems to be a possible reason - as many Columbia students leave the program after obtaining the BSN. Other reasons have to do with local work conditions requiring/recommending/preferring a BSN to work as an RN, I think...

    Columbia is efficient and difficult and from what I understand all the programs in different institutions have strengths and weaknesses. You are certainly asking the right questions!!
    good luck
  12. by   BerkeleyMom
    Quote from fluffhead
    :typing

    The Columbia program does confer a BSN en route, while similar programs (Yale) do not. Why seems to be up for debate. Incentive to retain students seems to be a possible reason - as many Columbia students leave the program after obtaining the BSN. Other reasons have to do with local work conditions requiring/recommending/preferring a BSN to work as an RN, I think...

    Columbia is efficient and difficult and from what I understand all the programs in different institutions have strengths and weaknesses. You are certainly asking the right questions!!
    good luck
    Interesting point, thank you very much. However even if you do not obtain a BSN, and pass the NCLEX, you can still work as an RN. I wonder if it would make it more difficult for them to reapply to a Master's programs again later--not having a BSN and already having dropped out of a program. It seems like the schools here, in N. Cali, look at students on a case by case basis. For example if I have a BA in another field and an RN without a BSN, I could probably still go for a MSN.

    However, if my plan was to get a BSN I would do an ABSN. If my plan was a MSN, I would do the direct entry.

    I think this clarity is what the admissions commitees are looking at, beyond grades, test scores, ect. I think they are often times looking to see which students understand their choice. If it is a direct entry MSN, students need to know what they are getting into and why they have chosen that specialty. I bet they lose a lot of money, if they don't carefully select, from students dropping out and working as RNs after they pass the NCLEX.

    I made sure that in my essay I disscussed the role of an FNP and why that was a better match for me, as opposed to disscussing my interest in the nursing field in general. I hope it was good enough ...
  13. by   iriska_meller
    I got accepted withou ANY related work experience. I think they look more at your course workload, if you took a lot of science with labs - it shows them you can handle the academic stresses of Columbia. I have also heard they actually prefer people with no experience - "they like to shape their own nurses".

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