CNS vs NP? - page 2

by cybermom463

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Hi, does anyone know the difference between a Clinical Nurse Specialist and a Nurse Practitioner? I am looking into going back to school for my RN-BSN/MSN. I'm trying to decide what I'd like to specialize in so that I can... Read More


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    Interesting llg. I think I would have been happier in the NP role which is why I chose this job - it blends the roles of CNS and NP. In IL, the SBON does also and does not differentiate between CNS and NPs as to prescriptive authority, collaborative agreement, etc.

    NrsKaren also posted some info from the AACN about the CNL - clinical nurse leader that they are considering. I am like Karen in that I believe we are so fragmenting our profession that if WE don't understand the differences between all our options, how do we expect the lay public to be able to tell the difference?
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    Quote from traumaRUs
    Interesting llg. I think I would have been happier in the NP role which is why I chose this job - it blends the roles of CNS and NP. In IL, the SBON does also and does not differentiate between CNS and NPs as to prescriptive authority, collaborative agreement, etc.

    NrsKaren also posted some info from the AACN about the CNL - clinical nurse leader that they are considering. I am like Karen in that I believe we are so fragmenting our profession that if WE don't understand the differences between all our options, how do we expect the lay public to be able to tell the difference?
    I just saw Karen's thead and posted to it. I agree with you 100% on the need for more clarity. I think the leaders of our profession who keep muddying the waters with more degrees, more job titles, etc. etc. etc. should be ashamed of themselves! I truly believe they are doing it to bolster their personal careers and the reputations of their schools and are NOT objectively considering what it truly best for the profession. I believe they are putting personal motivations ahead of the profession's (and the public's) interest.

    I think you and I and a few others could easily sit down and come up with a system of credentially and specialization that would make sense. It wouldn't be that hard to solve with just a little common sense. However, common sense has been thrown out the window as each professor and each school wants to develop it's own degree, it's own role, and it's own title in order to "be the leader" and receive grant money, etc. to establish and monitor the effectiveness of the role. The individuals want the publication and presentation opportunities that come with creating a new role in order to bolster their applications for tenure.

    The profession and the public would be much better-served with more clarity, more simplicity, and more consistency -- but that doesn't serve the personal career ambitions of the people calling the shots at the moment.

    Too bad for all the rest of us ...

    llg
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    You are so right llg. If you get the committee together, tell me when and where.
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    Quote from llg
    No one would confuse a Neonatal Nurse Practitioner with a Neonatal Clinical Specialist. On the other hand a Pych CNS and a NP working in psych might have almost identical roles -- as might a Community Health NP and a Community Health CNS.

    llg
    llg - There are many threads explaining the difference between NP and CNS but could you tell me why the difference between a Neonatal NP and a Neonatal CNS are different? I have been going back and forth about which direction I should go in. Thanks so much for any help!

    -Halleh
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    Quote from Halleh
    llg - There are many threads explaining the difference between NP and CNS but could you tell me why the difference between a Neonatal NP and a Neonatal CNS are different? I have been going back and forth about which direction I should go in. Thanks so much for any help!

    -Halleh
    Most NNP's function as "medical" providers. They function in a role almost identical to a "resident" in a neonatal ICU. They make medical rounds, write orders for lab tests, nutrition, medications, do procedures such as spinal taps, intubate, place umbilical lines, etc. They are part of the "medical" team that provides medical diagnosis and treatment under the supervision of the neonatologist.

    Most neonatal CNS's support the nursing team in their provision of nursing care to the babies. They monitor the quality of nursing care, develop and implement new nursing practices, provide education for both staff and parents, coordinate nursing student activities, oversee nursing orientation, do nursing research and evidence-based practice projects, etc. The focus is on the "nursing" management of the patient rather than the "medical" management.
    Halleh and traumaRUs like this.


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