The most ridiculous birth plans you've had the pleasure of reading - page 5

I don't know when I became so jaded- I had a birth plan with my son...every single thing went the opposite of what we had wanted (induction, ITN with subsequent pukefest and finally stat section for... Read More

  1. Visit  klone profile page
    1
    Our hospital now has peanut-shaped labor balls. The woman sits in the center portion of it. They're really cool.
    Baubo516 likes this.
  2. Visit  Fyreflie profile page
    0
    I love the peanuts! So much safer too and I agree, the only time I've ever strongly recommended Vit K right after birth was with a failed vacuum that became forceps (they had been going to decline, we compromised with during the first feed).
  3. Visit  IrishIzCPNP profile page
    5
    Quote from Mermaidblues
    "Force" is a strong word. Circumcision is not the only thing that can put a baby at risk for a bleed. Head trauma at birth is the main reason for Vitamin K. Considering how babies get here, they are all at risk for that possibility.
    It is a strong word and when we tell a patient they must accept vit k we are forcing it on them if they do not want it. Head trauma is normal to some degree. A typical vaginal delivery is something our bodies are design for. What makes us think this is necessary in every single delivery? Vit k doesn't come without risks.

    I, as a patient, a nurse and most importantly as the mom should always have the right to decline treatment I do not feel is in my child's best interest. I think a state forcing, which it is, vit k I completely wrong and beyond their right as a government. Strong word for a strong action.
    Baubo516, sharpeimom, futureRNicole, and 2 others like this.
  4. Visit  klone profile page
    4
    Quote from IrishIzRN
    It is a strong word and when we tell a patient they must accept vit k we are forcing it on them if they do not want it. Head trauma is normal to some degree. A typical vaginal delivery is something our bodies are design for. What makes us think this is necessary in every single delivery? Vit k doesn't come without risks.

    I, as a patient, a nurse and most importantly as the mom should always have the right to decline treatment I do not feel is in my child's best interest. I think a state forcing, which it is, vit k I completely wrong and beyond their right as a government. Strong word for a strong action.
    Right, and if the birth process itself was such a risk to babies, then we all would have died out as a species before Vitamin K shots were invented. But somehow, we all survived.

    The birth process is not a risk factor. The things WE DO to babies during the birth process and the first few days after birth before they make their own endogenous Vitamin K is what the risk is.
    melmarie23, Baubo516, Libitina, and 1 other like this.
  5. Visit  losbozos profile page
    1
    The vit K can be given orally.
    Baubo516 likes this.
  6. Visit  klone profile page
    0
    Quote from losbozos
    The vit K can be given orally.
    I'm not a huge fan of oral Vitamin K for breastfed babies.
  7. Visit  Fyreflie profile page
    0
    Quote from klone

    I'm not a huge fan of oral Vitamin K for breastfed babies.
    How come?
  8. Visit  klone profile page
    0
    If they're planning on exclusively breastfeeding, I like to try to avoid giving anything by mouth in order to preserve the natural gut flora. Of course, if there is any supplementation, it's a moot point.
  9. Visit  Fyreflie profile page
    0
    Quote from klone
    If they're planning on exclusively breastfeeding, I like to try to avoid giving anything by mouth in order to preserve the natural gut flora. Of course, if there is any supplementation, it's a moot point.
    Ah fair enough. I think I'd ask for an oral regimen vs injection for my own kids barring an assisted delivery. Or maybe just forgo it altogether.
  10. Visit  IrishIzCPNP profile page
    0
    Quote from Fyreflie

    Ah fair enough. I think I'd ask for an oral regimen vs injection for my own kids barring an assisted delivery. Or maybe just forgo it altogether.

    My 34 week vacuum assisted baby had the vit k. My nice unassisted vaginals stopped getting it when I learned it happened...some hospitals do it without consent. The problem with oral is you may need to provide it yourself.
  11. Visit  losbozos profile page
    0
    As an IBCLC, I agree w/ you principle. But, as a LC, OB nurse, & realist it is a rare bird (pt or nurse) that cares about that or that really listens. I put the oral vit K out there as a possible compromise in place of any head butting. The vit K can be administered after the first breastfeed. As for all the messed up information, practices, myths that break breastfeedin which proliferate our field, that's another thread. And, I could see a stroke in my future. :-)
  12. Visit  IrishIzCPNP profile page
    0
    Quote from losbozos
    As an IBCLC, I agree w/ you principle. But, as a LC, OB nurse, & realist it is a rare bird (pt or nurse) that cares about that or that really listens. I put the oral vit K out there as a possible compromise in place of any head butting. The vit K can be administered after the first breastfeed. As for all the messed up information, practices, myths that break breastfeedin which proliferate our field, that's another thread. And, I could see a stroke in my future. :-)
    As an OB nurse and IBCLC...you are very right ;0) I just talked to our staff LCs about doing education on ways we, the medical staff, ruin breastfeeding relationships.
  13. Visit  lovemyjoblandd profile page
    0
    I know we've gotten off topic with the Vit k, but I still wanted to throw my 2 cents in. I've been reading a lot about delayed cord clamping and cutting. Obviously once upon a time before medical interventions were thrust upon a woman, the mother delivered her baby, the cord stayed intact, she delivered the placenta, and what happened after that, who knows. The point I'm getting at is that since the cord was not clamped and cut immediately after delivery, all of that nice, rich placental blood was delivered to the baby, hence boosting RBCs and HH. Now so many providers are quick to clamp and cut that cord before it stops pulsing and the baby is "robbed" of that blood. The only increased risk I've seen with this delayed clamping is a very slight chance of high bili's (more RBCs to break down), and it has been shown that delayed clamping actually has long-term benefits for the baby. With this practice of clamping and cutting the cord so soon, it makes sense that the vit k practice has become so mandatory. I had never given a second thought to the delayed clamping thing until I start perusing this forum and seen other discussions. Now I'm a big advocate. What will it hurt?


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