New mother baby nurse to be ...would love some advice about what the hardships are.

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    Most of my experience has been on med/surg although I floated occasionally to postpartum and have just been hired to work on a mother/baby unit. I'm so excited about this as OB nursing is why I wanted to become a nurse in the first place. I'd love some advice / thoughts on what you like about the field and what you dislike. After reading through a ton of posts I get the feeling it's really busy and fast paced but I think I'll be okay w/ that after working medsurg. Any medsurg turned OB nurses out there who can compare the two for me?
    TIA!!
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    I've worked med-surg for about a year before transferring to OB. I found OB (PostPartum) to be less stressful compared to med-surg. Not too much meds (maybe just stool softener, iron supplement tab, pain meds, prenatal vitamins) compared to med-surg meds. Patient acuity not as bad. I would get 1 or 2 fresh c/s that I would help to get out of bed for the first time. The downside of transferring to OB/PP is your med-surg skills get rusty (knowledge of meds and diseases). Try to float to Med-surg once in a while so your med-surg skills won't get rusty.
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    L&D is very fast paced (or dull) but post partum is not usually hectic unless all the beds are full, pts. are delivering elsewhere and you are trying to get people discharged to get the beds clean so you can fill them up again. Most mothers are young and healthy and don't require a lot of care.
    PinkNBlue likes this.
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    Quote from jhhrn68
    but post partum is not usually hectic unless all the beds are full, pts. are delivering elsewhere and you are trying to get people discharged to get the beds clean so you can fill them up again. Most mothers are young and healthy and don't require a lot of care.
    Man, I want to come work where you are jhh!
    Our beds are always full!
    txpixiedust likes this.
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    I think the biggest problem I have is that I don't have time to teach my patients very much. That irks me! But the good things are that my patients are generally healthy though lately I've gotten and seen a lot of women with other issues that we are treating - bp's, respiratory, kidney, etc. etc.

    I also enjoy my team mates so that helps too

    It's very busy, sometimes I feel like a baby factory or something b/c we get them in, care for them, run around for them then discharge them, over and over. But its a job that I love! And the smells are not usually really bad LOL!
    PinkNBlue likes this.
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    Just wanted to thank everyone for their replies. My official start date for hospital orientation is June 16th and after 6 days of that, I'll be on the floor w/ my preceptor. I'm working weekends only (Fri, Sat, and Sun) on account I'm a momma myself w/ two babies under 2!!

    I'm really excited and nervous at the same time ... The nurse manager told me they have a typical couplet load of 6:1. After reading through more posts, that sounds like it's on the higher end so I hope I'm not too overwhelmed.

    Thanks to everyone ! nurse:
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    I am a new OB nurse as well...my first day of floor orientation is Wednesday! Perhaps we can compare notes as we go along... I am very excited, because this is why I too became a nurse.
    momma/babyrn likes this.
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    I also want to transfer to mother/baby but I have only med/surg type experience. (9 yrs of that) I have been out of school for a while now and I am afraid I don't remember what I need to for this area. I was wondering if you were given the chance to brush up on your skills where you work.
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    I'm excited for you and can't wait to hear how you are liking it! Keep in touch!
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    Learn as much as you possibly can about newborns. I have all too often seen ex-med/surg RNS being sort of blase IRT the babies and really missing some S/S of distress. On the mother baby unit, you are far more likely to encounter a baby going badly than a PPH.
    1)Hone your baby assessment skills and ask lots of questions on orientation.
    2)Become a breastfeeding expert and advocate.
    3)Be able to explain jaundice and rh and ABO incompatibility to your patients- IN TERMS THEY UNDERSTAND.

    Good Luck
    SarasotaRN2b, Elvish, and momma/babyrn like this.


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