first OB job

  1. Hello there all--
    I have a bit of a quandary which I think warrants some outside opinion. I am graduating this Sprong, and I have just started a new job at a hospital, 1st as a tech, and then once i grad. pass NCLEX, will stay on as an ldrp RN.
    I was super excited to have gotten this job, the unit is gorgeous, well kept and all. But I have to say that it's a bit, um...how do you say...homogenous?

    I don't know the clientele that well, as I have only been there 2 days so far, but I anticipate that I won't see much high risk patients coming in. Granted, any birth or baby can go bad, when you really think about it, (often due to too much intervention IMO), but I am concerned that I won't be utilizing that fresh out of school ability to learn quickly at this hospital.

    They deliver about 2500 per year, so the numbers are somewhat satisfactory, but I am afraid thqt I am shooting myself in the foot by not getting in somewhere more inner city....am I being stupid?

    I was angry cuz my friend in the program with me said that I was taking an "old nurses" position if I stayed there.....
    Help....I am in INNER TURMOIL!!!

    and it is ruining the glow of a new job.

    it doesn't help that the nurses are kinda snotty too...grrr.

    i mean when it all comes down to it, i could just get my first year in and then move on once I get my sh*t together, right??
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   shay
    Originally posted by joyrochelle
    But I have to say that it's a bit, um...how do you say...homogenous?
    ummmmm....what are you implying?
  4. by   mother/babyRN
    Ya, what does that mean.? If you mean low risk just be aware that there is no such thing in labor and delivery, no matter WHAT it says on paper....ANYTHING can and does happen....USUALLY when you are not expecting it...ESPECIALLY with the number of births you say your facility does, be prepared for anything...And I do mean, ANYTHING.......Maybe you could elaborate further as to what you meant by homogenous.......Low risk doesn't mean low risk...And patients with money are still patients who can tip the risk scale in a heart beat...They have the same problems, drug, social, emotional, physical and other wise.....You will definitely not put your skills to waste.. Give it time..Besides, you also have to look out for the people accompaningy your patients. We have had fathers or significant others pass out, have MIs, diabetic reactions and hostile reactions. You have to be ready for ANYTHING! Good luck...Don't worry, all sorts of difficult things will come your way before you know it...(If thats what you want???)
  5. by   mother/babyRN
    Maybe you could approach the nurses who appear "snotty" to you , and ask for their advice and experience. If you see the unit as not the greatest place for you, or somehow beneath your experience, they may sense that...Anyone appreciates sharing their advice and experience to someone who recognizes both as valuable tools and learning experiences. Just approach them and say, "Hey, I was wondering if you can tell me some of the things you have been through or experienced as a labor and delivery nurse, and what I should watch out for or be aware of.." If you are unsure of an exam, ask someone to recheck you and just be honest...They will appreciate you for that and want to help you learn. There is no better tool than a seasoned nurse..THEY know what is going on, even if it is as simple as asking them how to approach a difficult doctor...Think about that..Get your learning experience in this manner too. It is the most important source of info you will ever receive........
  6. by   joyrochelle
    I realize that any birth can turn bad, i think i mentioned that too. I am just a nervous new grad, hoping that I am making the most of a situation.
    By homogenous, I meant that they seem to look down upon things outside of a certain spectrum. i was privy to a conversation that involved 8 staff RN's talking about how freaky people are with tattoos, piercings, and dyed hair. myself being from a background of the aforementioned felt uncomforatble and instantly seperated from the staff....i am trying not to generalize here, but it rubbed me the wrong way, and supported any notions i had about them.
    and when i say snotty, they weren't snotty to me, just to some patients, who were from a lower income group. they seemed to brush them off and not talk to them nearly as much as our other patients.
    i hope you understand what I am trying to say....
  7. by   shay
    Originally posted by joyrochelle
    By homogenous, I meant that they seem to look down upon things outside of a certain spectrum. i was privy to a conversation that involved 8 staff RN's talking about how freaky people are with tattoos, piercings, and dyed hair. myself being from a background of the aforementioned felt uncomforatble and instantly seperated from the staff....i am trying not to generalize here, but it rubbed me the wrong way, and supported any notions i had about them.
    and when i say snotty, they weren't snotty to me, just to some patients, who were from a lower income group. they seemed to brush them off and not talk to them nearly as much as our other patients.
    i hope you understand what I am trying to say....
    Gotcha. Been there, worked with that. Hmmm....well, if they really rub you raw, then by all means consider going to a more urban hospital where no one gets all up in arms over tatoos and piercings....hey man, I can check your cervix past your clitoris ring without even blinking...LOL! A more urban hospital will be shorter staffed, though, more than likely...so investigate carefully before you leap.

    Don't worry about the snotty ones....I bet that sooner or later you'll find a nurse who feels the same way you do and you and she can be the 'adventurous' ones on the unit who take all the ooooo---ahhhhh!! tattooed, pierced, and heaven forbid...lower income patients and give them good care on that kind of unit for a change .

    Hang in there !!!
  8. by   mother/babyRN
    I aggree...People who can't appreciate you for being different from them really aren't at all as enlightened as you are....You sound as though you will do fine....And, nurses tend to talk about just about everything....If you notice someone treating someone differently rather than just talking about them, that might be something to be aware of...In the meantime, YOU would be the nurse to bond with a patient who might ALSO feel alienated from other nurses she feels in some way are judging her. YOU might be the person she bonds with and does well with..Perhaps you might even be able to glean important psychosocial info from her that otherwise might have been missed by people really not interested in her as a person..We all need different strengths and talents to approach people and you will bring something special to your unit, whether it be this one or another one in the future....Just be yourself..They will either get it or they won't, but you are strong with your identity and it will work out sooner than you can imagine. Good luck! Hang in there! We NEED you!
  9. by   joyrochelle
    wow...thanks. i like the sound of that.

    i don't mean to sound wimpy....just a little timid being the "new girl" and all...


    with that said...
    watch me go!:roll
  10. by   Angel Baby
    There is plenty to learn with all the "low risk" patients your unit gets. The trade off in bigger facilities (usually teaching facilities) is that you actually get less hands on--when you have residents guess who does all the vag exams? I've taken "experienced L&D nurses" from teaching facilities who 1) don't know vag exams, 2)don't have experience placing internal monitoring, 3) have never circulated and/or scrubbed a C/S, 4) don't have the ability to practice autonomously--because there was always a resident around to make the decisions.

    Everything is a trade off--you will learn so much where you're at--the high risk and high acuity patients will bless your life--of that I have no doubt. Build up the basic skills and then if you still require a constant deluge of adrenaline you can move up to a facility that has high risk units and/or OB critical care units.

    As for the snotty nurses--gosh I wish it wasn't so but there are "princesses" out there. What I find to be more common is making fun of the wierd stuff we see--venting with co-workers doesn't always mean that we care differently for any patient population--we joke all the time about our frequent fliers (tring to get enough bonus miles for a free delivery) and the tooth to tatoo ratio--sometimes you just have to figure out how to laugh at things and that may seem disrespectful. But, for the most part, nurses who work in OB have a real passion for what they are doing. We may burn out from time to time or "get hurt" and express it in odd ways--most of us old-timers still have a big heart for the patients we take care of.............................
  11. by   mother/babyRN
    And remember, ANY time you mention a patient's name, especially one who is a "frequent flyer" and perhaps, even a bit difficult, she will most likely be your next patient! Big superstition with big truth!

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first OB job