A DONS KNOWLEDGE or WHAT BEING A DON MEANS...

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    Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents
    Listening to what other people are saying and asking questions as appropriate
    Communicating effectively with others in writing as indicated by the needs of the audience
    Talking to others to effectively convey information
    Using mathematics to solve problems
    Using scientific methods to solve problems
    Using logic and analysis to identify the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches
    Working with new material or information to grasp its implications Using multiple approaches when learning or teaching new things Assessing how well one is doing when learning or doing something
    Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react the way they do
    Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions
    Persuading others to approach things differently
    Bringing others together and trying to reconcile differences Teaching others how to do something
    Actively looking for ways to help people
    Identifying the nature of problems
    Knowing how to find information and identifying essential information
    Finding ways to structure or classify multiple pieces of information Reorganizing information to get a better approach to problems or tasks
    Generating a number of different approaches to problems Evaluating the likely success of an idea in relation to the demands of the situation
    Developing approaches for implementing an idea
    Observing and evaluating the outcomes of a problem solution to identify lessons learned or redirect efforts
    Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs
    Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job Conducting tests to determine whether equipment, software, or procedures are operating as expected
    Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly
    Controlling operations of equipment or systems
    Inspecting and evaluating the quality of products
    Performing routine maintenance and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed
    Determining what is causing an operating error and deciding what to do about it
    Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools Developing an image of how a system should work under ideal conditions
    Determining when important changes have occurred in a system or are likely to occur
    Determining the long-term outcomes of a change in operations Identifying the things that must be changed to achieve a goal Weighing the relative costs and benefits of a potential action Looking at many indicators of system performance, taking into account their accuracy
    Managing one's own time and the time of others
    Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures
    Obtaining and seeing to the appropriate use of equipment, facilities, and materials needed to do certain work
    Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job
    Job Ability:
    The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences
    The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing
    The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand
    The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand
    The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a given topic. It concerns the number of ideas produced and not the quality, correctness, or creativity of the ideas.
    The ability to come up with unusual or clever ideas about a given topic or situation, or to develop creative ways to solve a problem The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
    The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to come up with logical answers. It involves deciding if an answer makes sense.
    The ability to combine separate pieces of information, or specific answers to problems, to form general rules or conclusions. It includes coming up with a logical explanation for why a series of seemingly unrelated events occur together.
    The ability to correctly follow a given rule or set of rules in order to arrange things or actions in a certain order. The things or actions can include numbers, letters, words, pictures, procedures, sentences, and mathematical or logical operations.
    The ability to produce many rules so that each rule tells how to group (or combine) a set of things in a different way.
    The ability to understand and organize a problem and then to select a mathematical method or formula to solve the problem The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly
    The ability to remember information such as words, numbers, pictures, and procedures
    The ability to quickly make sense of information that seems to be without meaning or organization. It involves quickly combining and organizing different pieces of information into a meaningful pattern
    The ability to identify or detect a known pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in other distracting material
    The ability to quickly and accurately compare letters, numbers, objects, pictures, or patterns. The things to be compared may be presented at the same time or one after the other. This ability also includes comparing a presented object with a remembered object
    The ability to know one's location in relation to the environment, or to know where other objects are in relation to one's self
    The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged
    The ability to concentrate and not be distracted while performing a task over a period of time T
    he ability to efficiently shift back and forth between two or more activities or sources of information (such as speech, sounds, touch, or other sources)
    The ability to keep the hand and arm steady while making an arm movement or while holding the arm and hand in one position
    The ability to quickly make coordinated movements of one hand, a hand together with its arm, or two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects
    The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects
    The ability to quickly and repeatedly make precise adjustments in moving the controls of a machine or vehicle to exact positions
    The ability to coordinate movements of two or more limbs together (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the body is in motion
    The ability to choose quickly and correctly between two or more movements in response to two or more signals (lights, sounds, pictures, etc.). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body parts
    The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to one signal (sound, light, picture, etc.) when it appears
    The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists
    The ability to quickly move the arms or legs
    The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects
    The ability to use one's abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing
    The ability to exert one's self physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath
    The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with the body, arms, and/or legs
    The ability to coordinate the movement of the arms, legs, and torso together in activities where the whole body is in motion
    The ability to see details of objects at a close range (within a few feet of the observer)
    The ability to see details at a distance
    The ability to judge which of several objects is closer or farther away from the observer, or to judge the distance between an object and the observer
    The ability to see objects in the presence of glare or bright lighting
    The ability to detect or tell the difference between sounds that vary over broad ranges of pitch and loudness
    The ability to focus on a single source of auditory (hearing) information in the presence of other distracting sounds
    The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated
    The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person
    The ability to speak clearly so that it is understandable to a listener.
    And thats only Representative Skills and Abilities of a DON,ADON,Manager...Include Representative Skills and Abilities for: Registered Nurses...
    Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents Listening to what other people are saying and asking questions as appropriate Communicating effectively with others in writing as indicated by the needs of the audience Talking to others to effectively convey information Using mathematics to solve problems Using scientific methods to solve problems Using logic and analysis to identify the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches Working with new material or information to grasp its implications Using multiple approaches when learning or teaching new things Assessing how well one is doing when learning or doing something Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react the way they do Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions Persuading others to approach things differently Bringing others together and trying to reconcile differences Teaching others how to do something Actively looking for ways to help people Identifying the nature of problems Knowing how to find information and identifying essential information Finding ways to structure or classify multiple pieces of information Reorganizing information to get a better approach to problems or tasks Generating a number of different approaches to problems Evaluating the likely success of an idea in relation to the demands of the situation Developing approaches for implementing an idea Observing and evaluating the outcomes of a problem solution to identify lessons learned or redirect efforts Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design Generating or adapting equipment and technology to serve user needs Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications Conducting tests to determine whether equipment, software, or procedures are operating as expected Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly Controlling operations of equipment or systems Inspecting and evaluating the quality of products Performing routine maintenance and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed Determining what is causing an operating error and deciding what to do about it Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools Developing an image of how a system should work under ideal conditions Determining when important changes have occurred in a system or are likely to occur Determining the long-term outcomes of a change in operations Identifying the things that must be changed to achieve a goal Weighing the relative costs and benefits of a potential action Looking at many indicators of system performance, taking into account their accuracy Managing one's own time and the time of others Determining how money will be spent to get the work done, and accounting for these expenditures Obtaining and seeing to the appropriate use of equipment, facilities, and materials needed to do certain work Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job
    Job Ability [ back to top ]
    The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a given topic. It concerns the number of ideas produced and not the quality, correctness, or creativity of the ideas. The ability to come up with unusual or clever ideas about a given topic or situation, or to develop creative ways to solve a problem The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem. The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to come up with logical answers. It involves deciding if an answer makes sense. The ability to combine separate pieces of information, or specific answers to problems, to form general rules or conclusions. It includes coming up with a logical explanation for why a series of seemingly unrelated events occur together. The ability to correctly follow a given rule or set of rules in order to arrange things or actions in a certain order. The things or actions can include numbers, letters, words, pictures, procedures, sentences, and mathematical or logical operations. The ability to produce many rules so that each rule tells how to group (or combine) a set of things in a different way. The ability to understand and organize a problem and then to select a mathematical method or formula to solve the problem The ability to add, subtract, multiply, or divide quickly and correctly The ability to remember information such as words, numbers, pictures, and procedures The ability to quickly make sense of information that seems to be without meaning or organization. It involves quickly combining and organizing different pieces of information into a meaningful pattern The ability to identify or detect a known pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in other distracting material The ability to quickly and accurately compare letters, numbers, objects, pictures, or patterns. The things to be compared may be presented at the same time or one after the other. This ability also includes comparing a presented object with a remembered object The ability to know one's location in relation to the environment, or to know where other objects are in relation to one's self The ability to imagine how something will look after it is moved around or when its parts are moved or rearranged The ability to concentrate and not be distracted while performing a task over a period of time The ability to efficiently shift back and forth between two or more activities or sources of information (such as speech, sounds, touch, or other sources) The ability to keep the hand and arm steady while making an arm movement or while holding the arm and hand in one position The ability to quickly make coordinated movements of one hand, a hand together with its arm, or two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects The ability to quickly and repeatedly make precise adjustments in moving the controls of a machine or vehicle to exact positions The ability to coordinate movements of two or more limbs together (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the body is in motion The ability to choose quickly and correctly between two or more movements in response to two or more signals (lights, sounds, pictures, etc.). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body parts The ability to time the adjustments of a movement or equipment control in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a continuously moving object or scene The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to one signal (sound, light, picture, etc.) when it appears The ability to make fast, simple, repeated movements of the fingers, hands, and wrists The ability to quickly move the arms or legs The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object The ability to exert muscle force repeatedly or continuously over time. This involves muscular endurance and resistance to muscle fatigue The ability to use one's abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without 'giving out' or fatiguing The ability to exert one's self physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath The ability to bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with the body, arms, and/or legs The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with the body, arms, and/or legs The ability to coordinate the movement of the arms, legs, and torso together in activities where the whole body is in motion The ability to keep or regain one's body balance or stay upright when in an unstable position The ability to see details of objects at a close range (within a few feet of the observer) The ability to see details at a distance The ability to match or detect differences between colors, including shades of color and brightness The ability to see under low light conditions The ability to see objects or movement of objects to one's side when the eyes are focused forward The ability to judge which of several objects is closer or farther away from the observer, or to judge the distance between an object and the observer The ability to see objects in the presence of glare or bright lighting The ability to detect or tell the difference between sounds that vary over broad ranges of pitch and loudness The ability to focus on a single source of auditory (hearing) information in the presence of other distracting sounds The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person The ability to speak clearly so that it is understandable to a listener.

    A Summation: DONS' Administer the nursing program in the nursing home, or other healthcare facility to maintain standards of client/patient/resident care; advises medical staff, department heads, and administrators in matters related to nursing care and services. Recommends establishment or revision of policies and develops organizational structure and standards of performance. Interprets policies and objectives of nursing care and services to staff and community groups.
    DONS' combine, evaluate, and reason with information and data to make decisions and solve problems.
    1.) These processes involve making decisions about the relative importance of information and choosing the best solution.
    DONS' the knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services.
    1.) Includes needs assessment techniques, quality service standards, alternative delivery systems, and customer satisfaction evaluation techniques.
    DONS' approve requests, handle paperwork, and perform day-to-day administrative tasks.
    DONS' keep up-to-date technically and know one's own jobs' and related jobs' functions.
    DONS' identify information received by:
    a.) Making estimates or categorizations
    b.) Recognizing differences or similarities
    c.) Sensing changes in circumstances or events.

    Through the NADONA/LTC Code of Ethics, Constitution and Charter, this association will support and promote quality of care for those individuals receiving long term care, and concern for those delivering long term care.


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    Code of Ethics:

    The Members of this Association, committed to the education, health and well being of nursing administrators in long term care and to those they serve, do hereby establish this Code of Ethics.

    To Develop oneself both educationally and professionally within one's ability, in the practice of long term care

    To promote the standards and objectives of this Association

    To educate and nurture those individuals who are under ones jurisdiction and to utilize ethical and professional guidelines when directing those individuals

    To stand in opposition to any and all efforts which violate or attempt to violate nurse Practice Acts

    To collaborate and join with other professionals, in promoting and developing quality care

    To promote, within the long term care facility, considerate, empathetic and respectful care

    To consistently strive to preserve the dignity and well being of those residents and personnel entrusted to oneself

    To promote and support research projects directed toward the care and well being of the long term care resident

    To represent this Association and the profession of nursing administration in long term care with courage, consistency and care.

    "All the results of good nursing, as detailed in these (notes) may be spoiled or utterly negatived by one defect, biz: in petty management, or in other words, by not knowing how to manage that what you do when you are there, shall be done when you are not there." - Notes on Nursing: Florence Nightingale, 1859

    The Client,Patient,or Resident come first!!!
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  4. 4 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Hi. IMO, you gave many examples of leadership at its best. To be a leader of excellence means you strive to be a person of excellence. That comes with introspection, experience, and maturity. That means going beyond your status quo. Many of us in positions of leadership have failed to outgrow our mindsets formed in our youth and early adulthood. Therefore, we experience more failures in leadership then success. More importantly, our failures in leadership potentially leads to failure of people we are responsible for leading.
  6. 0
    The 'examples' listed are the (or supposed too be)the basic skills of a manager,supervisor,ADON,and DON. NO-ONE is perfect as we learn something new daily and you will always have those that simply have no respect for authority and as such,reflect back on the managers,supervisors,ADON,and DON. I've always practiced; "That too receive respect,you've got to earn respect".
    I have always said to my staff that I'd never ask them too do anything that I wouldn't do and I listen intentively too any and all suggestions that they may have; my way isn't written in stone, and won't ever be. I learn from ALL of them and they from me.

    [Many of us in positions of leadership have failed to outgrow our mindsets formed in our youth and early adulthood.] Then it should be clear too you what you have too do; "GROWUP". All those in your charge(includes clients,patients,and residents) depend on you,I don't believe that anyone would accept a position of authority if they weren't confident that they could do the job; never,ever feel 'small' for asking anothers' advice or input,that's how we grow.
  7. 0
    Hi betts. I agree with many of your thoughts. I'm not sure if you were equating this, I don't believe that perfection equals excellence. I think it's unreasonable to expect perfection. I do think it's possible to be all that you can be. And no, that does not mean burning yourself out.

    I think that more importantly then respect, that a realistic sense of self-awareness is vital. In my neck of the woods, I've found too often that managers will hang their self-esteem on their title or who they know. I've felt in many instances that some of my managers got hired if they won a beauty, popularity, or political contest. They present themselves as a confident person, but they may not demonstrate this in their work and their treatment of their employees.

    I think one of the best ways of demonstrating confidence is finding opportunities to mentor employees. Managers should show growth, and in addition they can be in a position of helping someone else grow. Ultimately, it's up to the employee to do what they can with what they learn, but leadership excellence definitely sets the tone.
  8. 0
    MIjourney,
    My sentiments exactly but,it wasn't a beauty contest,popularity contest,or whom you know that got them their. It was dedication,hardwork and determination. All managers,including Charge or Head Nurses should encourage questions and show leadership by example not disdain.
    I tell all those,in my charge,and even some not,that when in doubt ask. I would never ask anyone of them to do anything that I myself wasn't willing too do. All any of us can do is what we can. I learn new methods or techniques on a daily bases and if any other healthcare professional does, I hold 'BULL SESSIONS' and we debate while trying to assess the outcome(s) for any client,resident,or patient. NO room here
    for 'Guesstimating"! I lead by example,from learning from others,asking questions,reading and watching countless demostrations; you've no-doubt,been there-done that!
    I say; Been that-done there...LOL


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