Need career advice for an RN who doesn't know where to go - page 2

by mcdq

2,959 Views | 15 Comments

Hello everyone! I graduated with a BScN, passed my CRNE, and now just about to start my first job as an RN in acute geriatrics unit in a hospital. The main reason why I took this job was because I just wanted to get some... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from mcdq
    Daisy_08, does that mean for me to apply to another area, I dont necessarily need to have these courses done?
    Yes, if you have seniority apply. If you are top seniority they will at least interview you and tell you to take xyz and reapply once you have them
  2. 3
    A lot of newer grad nurses after getting a solid year, transition to a float nurse position, if they are wanting to try out different areas. I have nursing 5 yrs, and am wondering if the perfect "fit" actually exists. A lot of other factors are important such as: schedule, people, and commute, ect. which influence finding that "perfect" job that works for you. I am a believer that education is always a good thing. But if you don't want to spend the money, try applying to areas of interest and see what happens. Experience is always the most valuable asset in nursing.
    Daisy_08, joanna73, and Fiona59 like this.
  3. 0
    Hi,

    I feel like I'm in the same position as you. In a RN and I worked acute care in a rural hospital for a year and now I'm working in LTC. I'm thinking about trying to get into acute/ER care at our small hospital so I'm working on getting my ACLS since they require it.

    I would advise to think about where you want to work (which is hard - I'm still not sure where exactly I want to work) and if needed get additional certifications if needed. Looking at job applications for similar positions and see what type of requirements is helpful.
  4. 0
    Quote from ruralgirl08
    A lot of newer grad nurses after getting a solid year, transition to a float nurse position, if they are wanting to try out different areas. I have nursing 5 yrs, and am wondering if the perfect "fit" actually exists. A lot of other factors are important such as: schedule, people, and commute, ect. which influence finding that "perfect" job that works for you. I am a believer that education is always a good thing. But if you don't want to spend the money, try applying to areas of interest and see what happens. Experience is always the most valuable asset in nursing.
    I really like the idea of being in a float-hopefully an opportunity comes up within my hospital in the near future!
  5. 0
    Quote from nikki_nurse
    Hi,

    I feel like I'm in the same position as you. In a RN and I worked acute care in a rural hospital for a year and now I'm working in LTC. I'm thinking about trying to get into acute/ER care at our small hospital so I'm working on getting my ACLS since they require it.

    I would advise to think about where you want to work (which is hard - I'm still not sure where exactly I want to work) and if needed get additional certifications if needed. Looking at job applications for similar positions and see what type of requirements is helpful.
    yeah I was thinking about that.. Just wasn't sure if I need the requirements first, or if I can get hired first then get my certifications (hoping the hospital would at least help me get them). Good luck with your (maybe) future application in a hospital!
  6. 2
    With budget cuts, unless you have experience in acte care or you consolidated on a critical care floor or have the critical care certificate... it'll be kinda difficult to get hired on critical care areas. MOST of the nurses hired on our ICU came from the float pool or an inpatient post-op unit. However, there's no hurt in trying to apply for a position there.
    joanna73 and Fiona59 like this.


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