New to teaching pharmacology

  1. 1 Hello! I am new to teaching pharmacology as well as new to teaching a lecture & lab course. My previous teaching experience has been in clinical only. Any advice/resources/links you all could offer would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  2. Visit  indagenes profile page

    About indagenes

    From 'Asheville, NC'; Joined Apr '06; Posts: 11; Likes: 1.

    15 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  pamrn71 profile page
    0
    Hi! I too am teaching Pharm for the first time this year. What type of school do you teach at? I was fortunate to be given the materials of the last instructor, but would also like any input anyone has.

    Thanks!
  4. Visit  iteachob profile page
    3
    This is a very good website for information, videos, you name it....
    http://www.ismp.org
    fgoff, pamrn71, and EvelynRN-BSN like this.
  5. Visit  pamrn71 profile page
    0
    Thank you. That's a great site!
  6. Visit  BigBadInstructor profile page
    2
    I have been teaching pharmacology since 1994, every fall and spring semester. The best advice I can give is to be enthusiastic when teaching. Pharmacology can be a very dry subject! I teach according to body systems, which gives the students a reference to the drug, disease processes, adverse reactions, and teaching the patient. If you cannot pronounce the name of the drug, or the generic form, use the audio pronounciation guide that comes with the textbook. I always try to include NCLEX questions with every exam, and not just test bank ones. Prior to each exam I do a "Druggo" game, similar to bingo, except I use M & M's for the markers, students usually like it just because they can eat the chocolate, or if allergic I use Necco wafers. One final suggestion, the NCLEX is now asking pharmacology questions using generic names and not brand or trade names. I make sure the students know both, and they are using both in clinical. Its a course that can be fun and educational for the student and for you. Good luck!
    Moss1222 and pamrn71 like this.
  7. Visit  marachne profile page
    2
    BigBadInstructor's comment about M&Ms reminded me of a activity that I had to do in my pharmacology class:

    Every student was given a set of medications that they were supposedly prescribed. The first thing they had to do was come up with a schedule for self administration, being careful about things like drug interactions, diet issues, take w or w/o food, etc. The first assignment was to turn in this schedule.

    Then we had to "take" our medicine (in the forms of M&Ms or other small edibles) for a week and then write up a reflection on our compliance and the experience.

    It's a great way to generate awareness in students of some of the burden of polypharmacy on patients!
    chrissypsychRN09 and Teresag_CNS like this.
  8. Visit  Denise RN profile page
    0
    "
    Re: New to teaching pharmacologyI have been teaching pharmacology since 1994, every fall and spring semester. The best advice I can give is to be enthusiastic when teaching. Pharmacology can be a very dry subject! I teach according to body systems, which gives the students a reference to the drug, disease processes, adverse reactions, and teaching the patient. If you cannot pronounce the name of the drug, or the generic form, use the audio pronounciation guide that comes with the textbook. I always try to include NCLEX questions with every exam, and not just test bank ones. Prior to each exam I do a "Druggo" game, similar to bingo, except I use M & M's for the markers, students usually like it just because they can eat the chocolate, or if allergic I use Necco wafers. One final suggestion, the NCLEX is now asking pharmacology questions using generic names and not brand or trade names. I make sure the students know both, and they are using both in clinical. Its a course that can be fun and educational for the student and for you. Good luck!
    I am interested in learning more about the Druggo Game and where do you get the NCLEX Pharm questions? I am jsut starting Pharm II prep. Thank you in advance for any info/help.
  9. Visit  BigBadInstructor profile page
    0
    I found Druggo in the book: Instant Teaching tools for health care educators by Michele L. Deck. The book is from Mosby and my book is from 1995, hopefully there is a more update copy. I got a lot of different games and such from that book. The pharmacology NCLEX questions, I get from the NCLEX books, and other pharmacology textbooks. Hope this helps
  10. Visit  alterego33 profile page
    3
    I have taught graduate level pharmacology to nurse anesthesia students and was appalled at the lack of basic knowledge of the students. Because they knew very little about pharmacokinetics, basic metabolism of medications and even math, I found it necessary to have the students take a remedial course before starting anesthesia school.

    My point here, if you are teaching at the undergraduate nursing level, please try to develop a course that is really pharmacology and not just what classes of drugs are given for various diseases. I personally think basic pharmacology should not be "dumbed down" in any program. The genetics and mechanisms of action are changing every day and our graduating RNs MUST understand more than the basics.
    CuriousMe, RNEducator4u, and iteachob like this.
  11. Visit  Goodoldnurse profile page
    0
    I teach an online pharmacology course. Most of my students at the moment are pre-nursing and some do very well. The students have questions to answer in each module that they must find in the book. The exams are online and of course they can use their book and notes to take the exam, but many do not do very well on the exams. I have built the course myself, and will pull some of it into class during the lecture! With NCLEX-RN being 13% pharmacology, it is so important!
  12. Visit  XIGRIS profile page
    0
    Quote from alterego33
    I have taught graduate level pharmacology to nurse anesthesia students and was appalled at the lack of basic knowledge of the students. Because they knew very little about pharmacokinetics, basic metabolism of medications and even math, I found it necessary to have the students take a remedial course before starting anesthesia school.

    My point here, if you are teaching at the undergraduate nursing level, please try to develop a course that is really pharmacology and not just what classes of drugs are given for various diseases. I personally think basic pharmacology should not be "dumbed down" in any program. The genetics and mechanisms of action are changing every day and our graduating RNs MUST understand more than the basics.
    I'm glad you mentioned this. I see nursing students doing clinicals in my hospital and I am very surprise at the levels pharmacology is taught in school. I agree that most are below average in terms of pharmacokinetics. I have listened to some of the lectures and noticed that it is mostly "basic" and dosages and generic names etc. Would it be great if one talks about cellular effects, mechanism on how Digixon cause its positive inotropic effects not " oh dont give it if heart rate is 60 ". I think students will be able to think critically if pharm is taught in that level.
    I asked an RN last night on why we use Cytotec and the answer was 'we want to induce labor'... well yeah but why, how? Anyway just venting....
  13. Visit  Teresag_CNS profile page
    0
    Marachne, I love the exercise you described! I, too, struggle to make Pharmacology interesting. One strategy: each class, I have students complete an exercise in application. For example, in one exercise, students had to read a case scenario, select the appropriate set of standing orders for heparin based upon the presenting problem, and complete a set of titration calculations based upon serial aPTT values. In another, they had to fill out a crossword puzzle, etc. etc.

    I can relate to the lack of pharm knowledge among nurses: I have never had a stand-alone Pharmacology course! My basic prep was an AD nursing program; I think this is why. My (bachelor's program) students are getting 2 quarters of Pharm and 2 of Patho; WAY more than I ever had.
  14. Visit  RNEducator4u profile page
    0
    "I have listened to some of the lectures and noticed that it is mostly "basic" and dosages and generic names etc. Would it be great if one talks about cellular effects, mechanism on how Digixon cause its positive inotropic effects not " oh dont give it if heart rate is 60 ". I think students will be able to think critically if pharm is taught in that level."

    I have also taught Pharm- didactic and in lab. After giving a guest lecture at a university in another state, I can well understand why students are not being taught pharm in the method that you, and I, as advanced degreed practitioners, would like it to be taught in. After giving my lecture, appropriate for BSN students, a PhD faculty member who happened to be listening to my presentation stated on the evaluation form, that I provided, that BSN students are NOT ALLOWED to diagnose and so I should not be asking them for information in which they would be presumed to be diagnosing! Unfortunately, she left before I was finished. (THough she did not put her name on the evaluation, I was able to compare her signature and other info on the sign in sheet with her handwritting on the eval. so knew who it was. ) Anyway, this is the mentality of some of the faculty members that are out there.

    I say, if a nurse notices something about her patient, does that mean she should not tell the doc about it as he is the one who should be diagnosing/noticing what is going on with the patient? What about the new baby docs who have to be "helped" by experienced nurses? After all, nurses spend more time with their patient and need to know what is going on with them- not just "the basics". Anyway, just my two cents worth.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top
close
close