Education Interventions to Pass NCLEX Education Interventions to Pass NCLEX - pg.2 | allnurses

Education Interventions to Pass NCLEX - page 2

I am curious what other educators are doing specifically to prepare students to pass the NCLEX. There seems to be some conflict regarding whether the BSN faculty want to teach students to critically... Read More

  1. Visit  VickyRN profile page
    #13 0
    While searching the literature, I came upon a good research article:

    Powell, H. (2003). Predictors of success in nursing education.
    ABNF Journal, 11/1/2003

    Abstract: This correlational study was designed to determine if successful completion of the associate degree nursing program and success on the NCLEX-RN were correlated to scores on the Educational Resources, Inc. NET and Pre-RN Examinations. Data were collected from the educational records of the sixty-eight successful graduates from the fall 2001 class. This study found composite scores on the NET and Pre-RN were statistically significant, and were useful in predicting success on the NCLEX-RN. Consistent with the literature, this study found standardized measures and educational records may be useful screening tools for admission to nursing school, to predict success in the nursing program, and the NCLEX-RN. Faculty may utilize these findings in advising students, for developing support services and to assist students in developing an action plan to prepare for the NCLEX-RN. As suggested by sample size and correlations, a replication study was designed.

    Key Words: Predictors of Success, Nursing Education Outcomes, NCLEX-RN

    Available from: http://www.highbeam.com/library/doc0...id=hbr_flinks1
  2. Visit  sandysue profile page
    #14 0
    Hi Indie,

    I was reading your comments to some of the other nurses and would be interested in learning more on how to write NCLEX style questions. Do you have any references or suggested articles that would help me develop this skill?

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks
    Sandysue

    Quote from indie
    In my school we revamped all our examinations to be in the form of NCLEX style questions. It took a few years to get to that point, but it did help our students by their own reports.

    Writing NCLEX style questions is a skill in itself - I had been an 'item writer' in another state and was also used to teaching part time for Kaplan, so I gave a workshop on how to write appropriate questions - this needed DON support and some staff were against it at first. I was also surprised at the low level of educational knowledge of the instructors - things like Bloom's taxonomy were new to so many. Eventually, with DON support, we gave workshops/CEUs for staff in these areas too.

    Schools with 'low' pass rates do not continue to receive BoN approval for the program; this is one thing the BoN monitors well because they are a consumer advocate agency and the students, to some extent, are consumers of what the school purports to offer. So I question the issues over 'low' pass rates. How does your school compare to the average in your state, or nationwide?

    When pushed by students to recommend an NCLEX style question book I would suggest the National Student Nurses' Association book - it seemed closest to what I knew about NCLEX questions.

    I do think it is very important to dispel the myths about NCLEX-RN (CAT) for students. Hold a fact session about the test with exact details on how a student is determined to pass or fail (this is complex - best illustrated by a graph with a hurdle on it, I believe), about the time issues involved and the mandatory break and optional break.

    Remind them to take water and possibly a snack and to take a test run to be sure they know how to get there and where to park etc. Do reinforce, 'while the computer is running, you still have a chance to show you can pass the test. Keep on.' I've had students take five hours and get thru nearly all the questions and still pass. Or had students failed with a shut off at 75.

    Remind students that the first questions are for practice, but they run into the real test with no clear break. Tell them that if a question just reads in a weird manner, to make a choice and move on (it is just possible that question is not part of the test, but is itself being 'tested'.

    Warn students that the test center may not have ideal conditions e.g. some students of mine took NCLEX with road works and drills outside the window or noise in the test center.

    Otherwise I just taught good nursing care, did not get into expert care scenarios with students as NCLEX tests a new graduate, not a critical care RN, critical thinking skills (e.g. we all know that to prevent osteoporosis, regular weight bearing exercise on the long bones is a good idea - make sure they can translate these sort of stylized responses into real life and realize this includes dancing, safe weight lifting.) I was surprised at the number of students who could trot out the text book statements, but did not know what these statements really meant in practice.

    Hope this helps.
  3. Visit  VickyRN profile page
    #15 0
    Attended a seminary this weekend hosted by one of the top experts on NCLEX-RN passage in the country, Dr. Frances Eason. The following was Dr. Eason's advice:

    One of the most salient points for teaching undergraduate nursing students (and future NCLEX passage): We teach our students beyond what they need to know.

    "Get to the bottom line."

    Are we teaching at a level that will not be tested?

    ICU nursing is not on the NCLEX-RN.
    No hemodynamic monitoring on NCLEX.

    Medical-surgical nursing is.
    NSR, V-fib, asystole are (basics).

    Another tip for successful NCLEX passage: Teach adult health last semester (general medical-surgical nursing).

    Most common disease state: CHF. Most common treatments: doctor-dependent treatments.

    OB/PEDS is worth only 6% on the NCLEX.

    Very little fetal monitoring will be on the NCLEX (not enough to really affect a student's passage rate).

    Most questions on the NCLEX are from the category of "Safe, Effective Care Environment" (~16%) and "Physiological Integrity" (~55%).

    If something is taught or tested (including extra credit items), needs to be covered in course objectives and in the syllabus. Never question at a difficulty level that is beyond the difficulty level (Bloom's) of the objectives, or is beyond the difficulty of the lecture/ instructional content.

    Prioritization is big on the NCLEX.

    Leadership course should focus on:
    1. Getting organized
    2. Leading yourself
    3. Getting the whole patient-care team organized
    4. Teaching the leader to be a member of the team (RN, LPN, CNA, etc. - Who can do what? To whom do you delegate? Which patient is top priority for the RN?)

    Should not teach budget issues in the undergraduate nursing Leadership Course - this is more suitable for MBA's and will not be on the NCLEX. The NCLEX is not about leading a hospital. The NCLEX is, however, about nursing care issues.

    At graduation, questions should be at 85% application/analysis, 15% knowledge/recall.

    In terms of nursing process, there should be more items dealing with interventions (senior level), plus rationales.

    New NCLEX has 265 items, 6 hours to complete. Need to give students in the last semester a 265-item test, so they can adjust to the rigor of the NCLEX.

    15 items on the NCLEX - are tryout or experimental (not necessarily at beginning of test).

    Only the last 60 items on the NCLEX really count. No matter how many questions it takes for the student to either pass or fail, the last 60 questions determine the person's score.
  4. Visit  Happyrn4U profile page
    #16 0
    Quote from indie
    In my school we revamped all our examinations to be in the form of NCLEX style questions. It took a few years to get to that point, but it did help our students by their own reports.

    Writing NCLEX style questions is a skill in itself - I had been an 'item writer' in another state and was also used to teaching part time for Kaplan, so I gave a workshop on how to write appropriate questions - this needed DON support and some staff were against it at first. I was also surprised at the low level of educational knowledge of the instructors - things like Bloom's taxonomy were new to so many. Eventually, with DON support, we gave workshops/CEUs for staff in these areas too.

    Schools with 'low' pass rates do not continue to receive BoN approval for the program; this is one thing the BoN monitors well because they are a consumer advocate agency and the students, to some extent, are consumers of what the school purports to offer. So I question the issues over 'low' pass rates. How does your school compare to the average in your state, or nationwide?

    When pushed by students to recommend an NCLEX style question book I would suggest the National Student Nurses' Association book - it seemed closest to what I knew about NCLEX questions.

    I do think it is very important to dispel the myths about NCLEX-RN (CAT) for students. Hold a fact session about the test with exact details on how a student is determined to pass or fail (this is complex - best illustrated by a graph with a hurdle on it, I believe), about the time issues involved and the mandatory break and optional break.

    Remind them to take water and possibly a snack and to take a test run to be sure they know how to get there and where to park etc. Do reinforce, 'while the computer is running, you still have a chance to show you can pass the test. Keep on.' I've had students take five hours and get thru nearly all the questions and still pass. Or had students failed with a shut off at 75.

    Remind students that the first questions are for practice, but they run into the real test with no clear break. Tell them that if a question just reads in a weird manner, to make a choice and move on (it is just possible that question is not part of the test, but is itself being 'tested'.

    Warn students that the test center may not have ideal conditions e.g. some students of mine took NCLEX with road works and drills outside the window or noise in the test center.

    Otherwise I just taught good nursing care, did not get into expert care scenarios with students as NCLEX tests a new graduate, not a critical care RN, critical thinking skills (e.g. we all know that to prevent osteoporosis, regular weight bearing exercise on the long bones is a good idea - make sure they can translate these sort of stylized responses into real life and realize this includes dancing, safe weight lifting.) I was surprised at the number of students who could trot out the text book statements, but did not know what these statements really meant in practice.

    Hope this helps.
    Hi Indie,
    I recently graduated with my MSN and will be taking a job writing test questions. I have not done very much of this so would appreciate any advice that you can give me. FYI, I wanted to give you my email address but your mailbox is full.
    Thanks.
  5. Visit  jjjoy profile page
    #17 0
    Quote from VickyRN
    One of the most salient points for teaching undergraduate nursing students (and future NCLEX passage): We teach our students beyond what they need to know.

    "Get to the bottom line."

    Are we teaching at a level that will not be tested?

    ICU nursing is not on the NCLEX-RN.
    No hemodynamic monitoring on NCLEX.
    Yet new grads, when they start working, ARE expected to know and be able to function at a level beyond what the NCLEX tests...

    And if much of what is covered in school IS beyond what a new grad needs to know, why the *BLEEP* is it being covered? There's already a ton of material to cover and very little time and opportunity to digest it and apply it and really make it real - and not just a piece of information to be recognized as 'best answer' on the NCLEX.

    Okay, my bias is probably obvious by now... something seems wrong to me when nursing school (at some schools) seems to be more about prepping students to pass the NCLEX (& covering all NLN required materials & writing long care plans from scratch) than to train up competent new grad nurses who will be expected to work with a full load of patients anywhere from a few days (LTC) to a few months after graduation.

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