Have dress codes changed for clinical prep? - page 4

by DoeRN 7,184 Views | 36 Comments

I was at work yesterday and the floor I was on had students there preparing for clinicals today. I was floored!! Two of the students had on leggings and super high platform heels. One had on a low cut shirt with her lab coat. ... Read More


  1. 0
    Nursing students don't have the expertise that comes with years of working as a nurse. Each patient they work with may have unfamiliar meds and diagnoses. Nurses who work on the same kind of floor for years become familiar with both of those as they work continuously with that population of patients. I work with a lot of drugs in the OR that I bet nurses on the floor may never have had a chance to work with.

    We were required to go the night before so that we had time to look up all those meds and the pathophysiology for those diseases before assuming any kind of care for the patient. Our care plans were also due before we left the hospital/LTC/other clinical location for the day, so not collecting info the night before would have made that impossible.
  2. 0
    Quote from sadavey

    Not to stray completely off topic...But what is the point of that? I have to know all of my meds, procedures, path of diseases, and labs for my patients too. And you know what? I have time (make time) to know them during the clinical day - because we have to hand off report to our instructor and other classmates at the end of the day and God help you if you don't know the answers to any question asked. Obviously, I understand that if it's a school requirement, it is a school requirement, but I doubt that I will ever understand or believe that there is an actual need to go to the clinical site to get information the night before. I still stand by that this definitely does not teach any time management - in fact, it hinders it.
    Hey don't shoot the messenger! When I was in nursing school this is what the program required. I didn't like staying up half the night doing prep for clinicals. It was something that was required and some schools still have this policy which is why I started this thread. I'm glad you don't have to go the day before and stay up half the night doing prep work.

    Now that I'm a RN, when I start my shift I go in get my assignment and get report. No prep involved.
  3. 0
    Quote from DoeRN

    Hey don't shoot the messenger! When I was in nursing school this is what the program required. I didn't like staying up half the night doing prep for clinicals. It was something that was required and some schools still have this policy which is why I started this thread. I'm glad you don't have to go the day before and stay up half the night doing prep work.

    Now that I'm a RN, when I start my shift I go in get my assignment and get report. No prep involved.
    At my school we are taking 4 pts each and doing everything from meds to assessment, charting, paging md's, dealing with pharmacy ect. There is not one spare moment in our day because as students, our time management sucks. Even if we wanted to attempt to look stuff up during the day we have to turn our prep sheets into the clinical instructor by 6am or we are sent home for being unprepared.

    I can't wait until I get my license and a job and can just get report and start the day.
  4. 0
    Quote from Sweet_Wild_Rose
    We were required to wear business casual and our lab coats. The school affiliated with the hospital where I work requires the same. The school I graduated from ended up having to require nursing students to wear graduation cap and gown to the pinning ceremony "because too many students dressed inappropriately." I assume that means too revealing, too formal (as in, the dress you'd wear to prom style), or too informal. I think several schools or the hospitals that host clinicals have started requiring uniforms to be worn because the students don't have a sense for what is appropriate attire.
    There are too many who believe a clean pair of jeans is sufficient. And appropriate. And see a "dress code" unnecessary and a nuisance. Clinical directors often have to (and should) give a run down on what is business casual with pictures/examples. Because often, if you are age 30 or under, "dress" has never been an issue for most. Also "dressy" means as if one were going out for the evening.
    For my own college age child, who is deep into internships, I lightly (LIGHTLY HAHA) remind that non-denim dress pants are the rule. And a flat, not a sneaker, nor any type of heel that is akin to a music award show/nightclub on a Friday night/a date. If Nikki Minaj or Lady Ga-Ga would think it cute, it is NOT for the professional workplace. Interestingly, kids think that this type of dress is "ugly" and not the current fashion, but don't get that in a professional setting, we do not care.....(but as a Mom I soooo do!! LOL)
  5. 0
    We were always expected to wear business or business-casual type dress... My one pair of trouser pants got a fair amount of use It did drive me crazy because we had a couple of people who would show up looking like slobs. What kind of message does it send if you show up with messy hair, ripped jeans, and flipflops? Think about it... maybe you are relaxed? Too relaxed? Not taking things too seriously? Not a good look, IMO.

    I am grateful to wear scrubs everyday, however.
  6. 0
    in that case the solution is simple. clinical instructor isn't doing her job, she should have immediately sent those 2 students home when they were at the lobby. Whatever the dress code is if its offensive and breaks the dress code of the unit then its inappropriate and not acceptable. Nurse manager at clinical site can call the school to complain and THAT will get results immediately as in clinical instructor will be called in to school to answer why and if needed reprimanded or replaced. My school's dress code was nurse whites with our ugly apron and patch and id, with full nurse gear in pockets.
  7. 0
    Our school requires us to wear our uniform for research. They had issues in the past with people abusing the policy and showing up with holes in their clothes or in PJs. Some of the other schools wear business casual with lab coats that borderlines on just casual with jeans. We have to wear our scrub pants and the shirt that looks like a culinary student's top with a patch on it.


Top