Need Advice on FNP school! - page 2

by amberthenurse 25,095 Views | 48 Comments

hi, i have been a nurse for about 2 years, but with only about 7 months real experience in the hospital. i am wanting to go back to school for fnp, but am a little concerned that i don't have enough experience. my questions are:... Read More


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    I agree with the above comment regarding critical thinking skill aquisition. I would go with ER (recognize "sick" vs "not sick", prioritize interventions, etc.) or ICU (analytical, critical thinking, lot of drug, patho and hemodynamic knowledge, greater autonomy, improved confidence). I would not spend my RN time juggling eight patients in a med/surg floor if I were contemplating becoming an APN.
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    Thank you. I would just like to take thing slowly and learn instead of being bombarded with six patients and I don't have time to breath let alone learn anything about their disease process. I think all the schooling falls short, RN training as well. I believe that the most important part of the FNP program is the clinical element, that will be the hardest and most useful!
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    Thank you so much! I feel the same way!
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    Sorry, I wanted to agree with Browndog, ER and ICU is where I would like to be it is just hard to go there with just coming off of orientation 2 months ago. I do have an interview tomorrow but it is med surg, which would be less hectic than IMC
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    Browndog, what do you think about home health with sick children as patients in a vent/trach environment? Also I am already ACLS qualified out of school.
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    Quote from MBARN
    PS: Also I was told I needed doctor's recommendations. When the heck do I have time to network with doctor's or get to know them on night shift! So I don't know what type of recommendations I need to get me into that program.

    Now that just makes me angry!!! Once again, it perpetuates the notion that we are doctors' handmaidens and their opinion counts so much more than people who acutally know you well and can speak to your abilities. I would think your unit manager's or DON's opinion would be much more valuable. Are there any other programs you could look into?
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    If it were me I would put myself in a position to learn as much as possible.

    For my money, that means being around as many bright people (attendings, residents, mid-levels, RNs, PTs, RTs etc) and as many sick patients (ICU, ER) as possible. Home health care is a practice setting where you are generally on an intellectual island. Go with a high-level, high-volume ED or ICU. The learning opportunities are different between them, but both provide the potential for an accelerated clinical education.

    Really stretch yourself. Make yourself uncomfortable now, as an RN, so you will be less so as an APN.

    browndog
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    Quote from Browndog
    If it were me I would put myself in a position to learn as much as possible.

    For my money, that means being around as many bright people (attendings, residents, mid-levels, RNs, PTs, RTs etc) and as many sick patients (ICU, ER) as possible. Home health care is a practice setting where you are generally on an intellectual island. Go with a high-level, high-volume ED or ICU. The learning opportunities are different between them, but both provide the potential for an accelerated clinical education.

    Really stretch yourself. Make yourself uncomfortable now, as an RN, so you will be less so as an APN.

    browndog
    Great advice! I am just having a problem getting a job in ICU and ER, everybody wants med surg and IMC b/c there is such high turnover! I agree with you I have been trying to get to a teaching hospital in ICU but with this economy the GN positions were filled in June and I didn't have the opportunity. For me ICU and ER are more fun than what I am doing. I LOVE the intellectual aspect and love what doctors do more than the nursing tasks. I LOVE the mental part of nursing! Thanks for all your input, very helpful for me! I will let you know if I get an ER/ICU job. I will be doing the HH part time, it does include taking care of very sick children and I will be alone so that training might come in handy for the pediatric part of FNP experience!
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    So glad to see this post. My plan had always been to work for 2-3 years as an RN (hopefully in an ER) before applying to a FNP program.....but all of my Prof's are recommending that I go straight into my grad program after graduation.

    Today, I spoke with an advisor from one of the grad programs I'm looking at and they also said that it's better to go straight from my BS in nursing program to grad school.
  10. 1
    If you plan on working while you are in FNP school, then your skills will continue to grow.
    missdeevah likes this.


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