Any Acute care pediatric NPs here?

  1. 0
    I'd love to talk to you about your role, how you made the choice to do this instead of primary PNP, working with the docs, job security, etc., etc.
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  4. 0
    I'd love to hear about this information too! I'm graduating in June and am very much looking to follow the path to becoming an ACPNP.

    Pure...
  5. 2
    That's alot of information, so i'll try to be brief but informative. I chose to become an acute care PNP vs primary care PNP because working in an MD's office would be my own personal hell. I also chose acute care because I really enjoy working in the PICU, and in my state a primary care degree wouldn't allow that. As far as job openings, that depends on your geographic region. In the south where I live there is a shortage of acute care trained PNP's (thanks to recent BON changes I believe). Here is the role for a PNP in my PICU: essentially the NP's function as a Fellow, but they have a patient load. That means helping put out fires, managing your own patients, procedures (chest tubes, intubations, LP's, CVL's, art lines, etc..), bedside teaching, and liason between RN and MD (attending and resident). Once the doc's have an NP, assuming you are doing a good job, they will not want to get rid of you because you make their job easier (that does wonders for job security). any other questions?
    NJnewRN and PurifyMe like this.
  6. 0
    Thanks, Montgomery!

    But yes, I have more questions, since someone can finally answer them here ther go... If it's not too much to ask, where did you go to school? Is the pay range comparable to the work you do? And what geographic region do you work in? you mentioned south....but I know that every BON is different and I also know that not all PICUs employ ACPNPs, like where I work (Cincinnati Childrens), there are attendings, fellows, and residents, no NPs in the PICU.

    Just trying to get an idea of where the jobs are and the best programs to attend would be. Im sure there are programs out there, but there are only currently only 16 PNCB recognized programs per the PNCB website so that limits the educational opportunities substantially. Thanks for the info, you have no idea how much it helps. before getting info was like.....

    Pure
  7. 0
    Went to Vanderbilt for MSN. As far as the best program, that's a loaded question. I chose Vanderbilt because I knew people who had gone there and because it was distance ( i had to have distance). IMO anything that gets you eligible to sit for the exam is OK. A degree from a fancy place looks great on paper, but at Vandy I encountered plenty of people who I felt wouldn't make good NP's. By the pay range being comparable, do you mean do I feel i'm making enough money for the things I do at work? thats a somewhat complicated answer for me to give you so i'll try the short version. I currently live in Oklahoma and work in a PICU, however, my hospital was not able to come up with a competitive salary for me, so i'm probably moving to Dallas to work in an ICU there. What they will offer me is a competitive salary
  8. 0
    Thanks so much for your answers! I guess I may be on the right path. I plan to attend UTA in Arlington Texas because of the potential networking opportunities there with Cook's Children and Children's Medical Center Dallas. Plus, I can complete the ACPNP program as well as add a few more credits to become an educator also.

    Thanks again
  9. 0
    Do you already have a MSN? UT Arlington's AC-PNP program is post-Masters only unless it very recently changed. just FYI.
  10. 0
    No, I do not currently have a MSN, however, I'm told that the program does now offer both the regular degree plan as well as the post master's certificate degree plan. The website is contradictory because it stills reads as if it only has a post masters, yet has a link for a regular degree plan. I did however call and ask.
    Check it out...

    http://www.uta.edu/nursing/MSN/acutr..._pediatric.php

    Thanks for looking out though.
  11. 0
    Quote from montgomeryward
    That's alot of information, so i'll try to be brief but informative. I chose to become an acute care PNP vs primary care PNP because working in an MD's office would be my own personal hell. I also chose acute care because I really enjoy working in the PICU, and in my state a primary care degree wouldn't allow that. As far as job openings, that depends on your geographic region. In the south where I live there is a shortage of acute care trained PNP's (thanks to recent BON changes I believe). Here is the role for a PNP in my PICU: essentially the NP's function as a Fellow, but they have a patient load. That means helping put out fires, managing your own patients, procedures (chest tubes, intubations, LP's, CVL's, art lines, etc..), bedside teaching, and liason between RN and MD (attending and resident). Once the doc's have an NP, assuming you are doing a good job, they will not want to get rid of you because you make their job easier (that does wonders for job security). any other questions?
    This is good to know. So if I would definitely need to become an acute care PNP instead of a primary care one. I am thinking of just getting my ABSN because a lot of the direct entry programs don't allow you to do acute pediatric care.
  12. 0
    I'm doing a primary care ped np with plans to do a post masters certificate in acute down the road. I like idea of being educated fully in each area.


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