Lazy and disrespectful Nursing Assistants - page 4

by lilaclover6984 6,607 Views | 38 Comments

This is a vent post! I just can't hold it in any longer and had to vent somewhere so I figured maybe some of you can understand or offer suggestions. I work night shift on a medical transition unit and am often in the... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Marshall1
    What is "NBD?"
    No Big Deal.
  2. 0
    I wish I could tell my CNAs and phlebotomists to clock out and go home. They are quite often surly and crass. In reality, I'm not really sure how they are able to hold a job. I work for a major health system in SE PA, and am continually amazed at the behavior that is tolerated. I have CNAs disappear for hours, phlebotomists voicing their distaste for their jobs repeatedly, while I run around for 14 hours without a break. I'm not really sure what the phlebotomists would be doing, were I to draw labs. I leave work frustrated and discouraged often. I've taken to documenting the behavior of my subordinates regularly, I guess stockpiling for the day when I really can't take it anymore.
  3. 1
    It seems like we, as nurses, continue to absorb the jobs of anyone unwilling to do theirs. I feel like each day I am forced into absorbing the jobs of unit secretaries, CNAs, and dietary. I have plenty of things to do within my own scope. I work rehab, and often hear PTs and OTs returning pts. to their rooms saying, "Just call your nurse." Regardless of what the pt. wanted at that point. Did they wish to be returned to bed? Who cares? The RN has an endless amt. of time....
    wooh likes this.
  4. 2
    I'm a CNA in the dementia unit of an LTCF and I can't imagine behaving this way towards my nurse. I would expect to be fired for yelling at a nurse-no question. If we are having a slow night and have the time to sit around and chat (we would never dare take out our phones!) our nurse finds us something to do. There are lifts and stands to be sanitized, baseboards and doorknobs to be washed, rooms to be straightened...always something to do! If you don't want a chore to be found for you, you keep your butt busy. The way they look at it is, if 4 aids have all this free time, then management will decide we don't need 4 aides and cut a position. A lot of aides don't like working with my nurse because of these things, but she is respected and she is the first to stand up for her aides if we need it. To me, if I find a nurse doing something that is 'my' job because I am busy with something else, I am almost ashamed because she is taking time away from her job to help me.
    joanna73 and Hygiene Queen like this.
  5. 0
    Staff meeting time on what they SHOULD be doing each shift. And 2 can round together, while one takes the call bells and float. You need the support of your manager and education person. And a plan for the night. And to be clear on the plan. And that the IT department should disable the internet on the social media websites and you tube stuff, and no cell phones. Have a written schedule of what it is the CNA's are to be doing on the night shift. If there are 3 CNA's then 2 can be tag teaming patients. It also works if there is a lead CNA per shift. It then puts the responsibility elsewhere to direct. You could suggest a lead CNA on a trial basis, and see if it impoves any. Best of luck!
  6. 1
    Quote from SeaGypsy1
    I have already posted a comment about dealing with the problem, but I feel that I really need get on my soap box about how we created the problem. The whole thing comes down to respect, and we have created it for ourselves! I started working as a nursing assistant in a hospital in 1968. When I think back to that time, roles were very well defined and there was a chain of command that ended with the Head Nurse who always worked days but was also responsible for all shifts on her unit. Nurses were required to wear white, and they were also required to wear their caps, which they did with pride. Your cap represented hard work and achievement. I graduated from nursing school in 1973 and I donned my cap with pride. Somewhere along the line nurses decided they didn't want to look like a nurse and the tradition was lost. That is when everything started to change. There is no longer the passing of the torch from the Head Nurse to the Assistant Head Nurse. That generally happened because the assistant was learning, and when she assumed duties and responsibilities as Head Nurse she was prepared to do so. Now everyone is a "charge nurse". It doesn't matter if they have had training, and when you walk onto any unit in any facility I challenge you to immediately identify the charge nurse, as a matter of fact, I challenge you to identify the nursing staff!!

    At my facility, the RNs and LVNs all wore white and caps for Nurses Week last year. Amazingly most of us were able to find our school caps. The transformation was incredible! I saw a total change in behavior. I saw nurses carrying themselves with pride and other members of the team interacting with them in a respectful manner. I saw patients amazed and happy that they knew they were dealing with a nurse. I saw visitors smile and stop to comment on "how wonderful it is to see a nurse who looks like a nurse". We now have what we call "Wednesday White". The licensed nurses all wear white and caps, and we continue to have nothing but positive feed back from patients and visitors, and YES I believe that it has started to take us back to a time of respect - not just for the nurses but for each other. Try it, you might be surprised.

    P.S. I wear white every day, and sometimes I even wear my cap when it's not Wednesday.
    Yes, but those were also the days when nurses were subservient to docs...I had to wear white pants in nursing school, which such a big PITA. We weren't allowed to wear it in psych rotation and in peds because of the effect it might have on the patients.

    I work in a children's hospital now and everyone in the facility has a different colored badge with the name of their profession on it to denote where they are from patient care techs to RNs to pharmacy to doctors. Even PT/OT has their own color. I much prefer this to wearing white and/or wearing a cap.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  7. 0
    Our unit has similar issues. However, I am firm with the NAs about my expectations. Recently, we had them review and sign job descriptions to be put in their HR files. It's not easy, but you need to foster a team environment and be consistent with your expectations.

    Some days I am not very popular, and I could care less, since I do my job, and they are expected to do theirs. I'm also more than willing to help, and most of the NAs respond positively to management who are willing to share the load.
  8. 0
    Quote from jadelpn
    Staff meeting time on what they SHOULD be doing each shift. And 2 can round together, while one takes the call bells and float. You need the support of your manager and education person. And a plan for the night. And to be clear on the plan. And that the IT department should disable the internet on the social media websites and you tube stuff, and no cell phones. Have a written schedule of what it is the CNA's are to be doing on the night shift. If there are 3 CNA's then 2 can be tag teaming patients. It also works if there is a lead CNA per shift. It then puts the responsibility elsewhere to direct. You could suggest a lead CNA on a trial basis, and see if it impoves any. Best of luck!
    I like the idea of a lead NA. I will bring that to management and see what they think. Have you worked somewhere that has done this successfully?
  9. 0
    Sounds as though maybe their isn't real direction and expectations. As you have a work list they need one as well for their shift.
    Unfortunately many nursing assistants are like this. Where I work they do so little and constantly complain about nursing. I am in an advanced role and find it appalling they are allowed to behave the way they do. I have witnessed aggressive behavior to the nurses and even just walking away. They talk on their cell phones or listen to music while in a patients room. I have even seen them engage in horseplay in a patients room. The response was "we were just kidding around". Really! Unless nursing takes a united stand and delegate appropriately and management support this care will only deteriorate.


Top