worth it to apply to roseman? - page 2

I am going for their absn program, however I live all the way in socal. My main purpose is to apply to this program as a back up school. I know that tuition is 55k and it is about 1 year and 8 months... Read More

  1. by   LVNurse17
    Quote from nurse2bnoob101
    can you list the pros and cons? how much was overall cost including tuition and living expenses
    Pros:
    - You get finished FAST.
    - Roseman has a very good reputation with the hospitals in the valley so getting a job is relatively easy.
    - GPA won't be a problem if you want to continue your education. Either you pass with a 90% on every assignment, exam, etc, or you fail. However, you get a lot of tries to get to that 90%. These include a group exam (if the group scores 90% on the group exam, you get extra points), evidenced-based review, and 2 remediations to attempt to get the 90%.
    - Instructors are always there for the students. I've never had a bad experience with them. All of them want you to succeed and be the best nurses you can be. However, this does not mean feeding you information and expecting you to just memorize it. You need to truly understand it.
    - Tests are NCLEX-based so you get a lot of practice with NCLEX-style questions
    - The cohort basically becomes one big family. They are all you have these next year in a half of your life, especially since most of the cohort comes from out of state (mainly California). You will love them, you will hate them, but at the end of the day they are family and you wouldn't be able to get through the program without them.
    - Everything is online. This is also listed in the cons below. With proper time management and planning, you can literally be in class anywhere. I was able to travel to 10 states and 2 different countries during the blocks (we call classes blocks) where I didn't have to be on campus for weeks at a time.
    - Roseman's blocks are one after another. You only take one class at a time, which is great because you only have one priority to focus on. They also build on another so you're constantly increasing your knowledge from fundamentals to critical care/thinking of different disease processes.

    Cons:
    - Cost. It's a private institution and I believe one of the most expensive programs in the Las Vegas Valley.
    - I'm not referring to the BSN program, but the ABSN program is very intense. If you are a traditional learner and learn best with person-to-person instruction, I highly suggest looking into the BSN program instead. ABSN is almost all self-taught. Everything but the exams, lab, and clinical days are online. The professors have office hours for you to be able to meet them in person and have them explain anything you may need clarification on, but you're on your own for the most part.
    - The stress of the 90% minimum on everything cracks you down. Hearing stories of hard exams and people failing to of the program really get to you and you need to know how to pick yourself up out of those occasional dark places and have a good support system behind you.
    - I am not one of these people, but a lot of people moved to Vegas from out of state and had to deal with the effects of this move. These include rent and homesickness.
    - There is a very big lack of communication and organization in this program. There are plenty of last minute changes and the students end of having to deal with the effects of this.

    Costs depend on you personally. I know a lot of people who had to take loans for the entirety of tuition expenses AND living expenses. I know the cost of living here in Nevada is not as high as the cost of living in some states. Rent for a 1 bedroom 1 bathroom is around $800 without utilities. A couple of people were able to work and go to school at the same time, but I would recommend against this because of the amount of stress the program brings already. I took out loans to cover living expenses and tuition and although I am still in the 6-month grace period, I'm already stressed about the amount of money I owe.
  2. by   hhuynh14
    Which campus would you recommend? I'm still indecisive between the Utah and LV campus. I like the weather and the nature aspect of Utah, but I heard more good things about the LV program. Plus, I'm not really sure how I can handle the 100+ degrees in LV.
  3. by   nurse2bnoob101
    the 90 percent exam thing scares the living day lights out of me. Can you go into more detail how it works exactly?
  4. by   Jennyxjenx
    There is about 15 guys out of 58 in my cohort!
  5. by   Jennyxjenx
    I was raised in Vegas so I stayed here but if your into hiking and snowboarding Utah would also be great
  6. by   Nursingk8
    Hi everyone. I was just wondering about getting student loans and grants to cover the cost of tuition. Since the ABSN program is only 16 months, does that mean you can only get one years worth of student loans and grants? If so, say you take out about 12k student loans and pell grant of 5900 that leaves about 42k left to try to get elsewhere. Yikes! Please tell me I'm wrong.
  7. by   Jennyxjenx
    I had to basically take out a private loan for the entire cost yikes is right :/
  8. by   LVNurse17
    Quote from hhuynh14
    Which campus would you recommend? I'm still indecisive between the Utah and LV campus. I like the weather and the nature aspect of Utah, but I heard more good things about the LV program. Plus, I'm not really sure how I can handle the 100+ degrees in LV.
    Recently, two programs have merged to prevent cheating and ensure both campuses get the exact same material being taught/being tested so there are no differences in which program is "better". I could only speak about Las Vegas, but the 115 degrees is not so bad nevus for the most part, the locals tend to stay inside. We also are only a couple hours away from LA, Utah, and Arizona, so most of us go on day trips if we really can't take it anymore. We also have Mount Charleston for anyone who wants to hike in the summertime. It almost never gets above 80 degrees there. Since you think you would like the nature and weather of Utah more, though, you may want to consider Utah more.
  9. by   LVNurse17
    Quote from nurse2bnoob101
    the 90 percent exam thing scares the living day lights out of me. Can you go into more detail how it works exactly?

    As weird as it is to say, it isn't as hard as it sounds. The testing process really lets people have the maximum amount of chances to get the 90%. First you take the exam by yourself. Then, you go into your groups to take a group test. There are about 8 people in your group and you are assigned to them in orientation and you do everything with them. If your group scores a 90% or above, you get 5% added to your individual exam (you get 3 points for 60 questions, 4 points for 80, etc.). After, the class goes into an evidence-based review. You can get questions nullified, turn your wrong answer right, etc. if you provide evidence from your reading that you are correct. The professors will go through them (make sure you provide as best of an argument as possible!) and make any changes they deem appropriate. I've had tests where I gain 10 points because of evidence-based review.

    If you fail the first try, you get to remediate the exam and go through the whole testing process again a few days after. However, you do not get group points. If you fail again, you go into super-remediation. This is a comprehensive exam and you go through the whole testing process again. You don't get group points in this exam, either.

    Hope this helps! If you have more questions or need any clarification, let me know. I'll be replying a lot faster now that I'm not studying for NCLEX anymore!
  10. by   LVNurse17
    Quote from Nursingk8
    Hi everyone. I was just wondering about getting student loans and grants to cover the cost of tuition. Since the ABSN program is only 16 months, does that mean you can only get one years worth of student loans and grants? If so, say you take out about 12k student loans and pell grant of 5900 that leaves about 42k left to try to get elsewhere. Yikes! Please tell me I'm wrong.
    It depends on where you get the money. I was able to get 2 years of financial aid from a scholarship because the program was over 12 months. It just depends on whoever is giving you financial aid. The financial aid advisors in Roseman do a very good job at assisting anyone who needs it.

    In my instance (and most people I know that had to take out loans), we took out loans in chunks. There are different payments due every few months instead of one big payment since the school knows most of us are not able to take out $70k+ in one time. For example, I can take out $30k in July when I start the program and take out the rest of the tuition in the next big payment date in December.
  11. by   Jennyxjenx
    E mail me if you want Info with text books jennyxjenx@hotmail.com

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