question about new grad orientation

  1. HI, I will be graduating in December and want to work in ICU. In school clinicals we barely get to do any critical care (we only rotate through ICU for one day). Our lecture content also does not get to in depth. I was wondering what kinds of things you learn/are taught in critical care orientation/intern programs. Are you taught everything you need to know or do you have to learn a great deal on your own?
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   NurseBoricua
    When I did work in sicu, the hospital provided a four month orientation and inservices on equipment whether you were a new grad or not. They also staff a nurse educator to help you with getting signed up for acls and inservices. You learn a lot and there will always be things you don't know. Not every day is the same. When in doubt, ask.
  4. by   NurzofFaith
    I graduated in May and began an internship in June. The internship was a mix of OJT with a preceptor and classroom time. We had classes on equipment, codes, pharmacology, all the hospital policy and procedures, etc. We also had to attend an ethics course.

    I have BLS but am required to have ACLS within 6 months of being in the unit, for me that is in December. I also have to take an IABP class.

    I feel that the internship was more than adequate and I learned SO very much, but I have SO very much more to learn. Some days I feel confident that I am getting it and learning and other days I feel I am just keeping my head above water. The best advice I could give...ASK!! The nurses you work with expect it and KNOW you will not know everything, they would rather you ask than hide mistakes. (The hiding mistakes happened with one of the new grads I began with..she is now reorienting after some pretty big med errors. If it doesn't work and she doesn't take responsibility of her actions, she has said they will place her outside the unit.)

    I think working in a critical care unit is do able, but it takes everything I have for the given 12 hours and I question myself constantly. I am so thankful for the wonderful co-workers I have as resources, they are really supportive!!

    Hope this helps, best of luck to you too!!

    ~Channa
  5. by   icunurse172
    I agree with everything said. I have been working in ICU for 5 years and still learn new things every shift. ICU staff are generally supportive we have all been through it. We never refuse to help or give advice to co worker we all apeciate how hard the job is and we all need support at time whether clinical or emotional.
  6. by   Gompers
    Quote from irismae
    HI, I will be graduating in December and want to work in ICU. In school clinicals we barely get to do any critical care (we only rotate through ICU for one day). Our lecture content also does not get to in depth. I was wondering what kinds of things you learn/are taught in critical care orientation/intern programs. Are you taught everything you need to know or do you have to learn a great deal on your own?
    I don't work adult ICU, I'm in the NICU - and you KNOW we didn't learn much at all about that specialty in school. Talking to other nurses at my hospital - it seemed that ALL the ICUs had extensive orientation programs, especially for new grads. We all got at least some classroom-type time learning about the specifics of our units, plus at least a couple of months being precepted on the unit before we were set loose on our own.

    Overall, new grad orientation programs in ICUs are very in depth and provide you with what you need to know in order to safely work on your own. Good luck!
    Last edit by Gompers on Feb 27, '06
  7. by   HHW2006
    I will be working in ICU following graduation in May. My orientation is 16 weeks (at least) and will consist of ACLS, EKG and IABP classes among others. I have been assigned a preceptor who I will be with for the full 16 weeks. It is a great program-really designed to help you succeed. Good luck to you!!

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