Thinking about going back to the floor, but.....

  1. 0
    I'm moving to hawaii in several months with my boyfriend (he is from hawaii and is homesick, poor thing) and I am contemplating returning to the floor. However, it has been difficult for me to forget my horrible experience as a new nurse in Seattle. My first job had me convinced I would never work on the floor again. Had a horrible preceptor who was patronizing, unprofessional, and disrespectful to me while I was learning. And as a new nurse, it was difficult to oversee this experience. I quit after 4miserable months and felt like my world was turned upside down. Since then, over the past 4 years I've gained experience in clinical research, in infectious diseases and BMT. I'm also managing a team of 8 people. I did well in school and have my OCN. With all that being said, does anyone know of a good hospital, with a good preceptor program? I am willing to give the floor a chance again. I do good work and I would like to work with someone who enjoys teaching and provides challenge in a positive way for growth. I am a little rusty on the technical skill of nursing and would need patience with that. I appreciate any encouragement and recommendations.

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  2. 11 Comments...

  3. 0
    Quote from GirloftheSun
    Since then, over the past 4 years I've gained experience in clinical research, in infectious diseases and BMT. I'm also managing a team of 8 people. I did well in school and have my OCN. With all that being said, does anyone know of a good hospital, with a good preceptor program? I am willing to give the floor a chance again. I do good work and I would like to work with someone who enjoys teaching and provides challenge in a positive way for growth. I am a little rusty on the technical skill of nursing and would need patience with that. I appreciate any encouragement and recommendations.
    I'm a little confused. What kind of work do you actually do? It's unclear whether you're involved in nursing at all right now.

    And what does "gained experience" mean, exactly? How long did you work in these areas?

    Working on a floor is tough, perhaps tougher now than ever. A hospital might require that you take a refresher course unless you have some recent experience in patient care.

    I'm not sure where you would take that course here, though. Maybe you can take one before you leave Seattle? It might help with obtaining a floor position.

    Addendum: First time that I've seen you on the Hawaii forum and I got curious. It seems, from some of your previous posts, that you really disliked bedside nursing. What made you change your mind?

    I think you could probably get a position in research if you wanted to continue doing that.
    Last edit by WindwardOahuRN on Jul 3, '07
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    To clarify when I say I've gained experience in clinical research: My job title is a research nurse. I do investigational drug studies, which involves administering medication, assessing for toxicities, following labs, intervening etc. I work closely with a doctor except for I do all the work (surprise there!). Basically, a lot more paperwork and less patient care. A refresher course is a good idea, however, I'd probably be just as well off taking a new grad orientation although technically, I'm a new grad. I think you're right on when you say bedside nursing is harder than it was before. My friends who are nurses for 5 years are ready to call it quits.

    Sometimes I question whether I chose the right career path at all. I think if I had better experiences in my clinicals at school and during my first job, maybe I would feel differently about bedside nursing. However, I really can't pass a judgement because I haven't given it a fair chance. And I'd like to try it again. At least then I can say I tried and it wasn't a fit. I've noticed there are jobs in research. I enjoy clinical trials work, I'm just ready for a bit of a change.
    Last edit by GirloftheSun on Jul 3, '07
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    Quote from GirloftheSun
    A refresher course is a good idea, however, I'd probably be just as well off taking a new grad orientation although technically, I'm a new grad.
    Actually, with all due respect, you're not a new grad. You graduated a few years ago and have done mostly research nursing since you graduated (which is not necessarily a bad thing). You are not a new grad, just a nurse who doesn't have much bedside nursing experience. People take different paths---you chose research. Not terrible by any means, but you are no longer a "new grad." You're a research nurse.

    Honestly, I think hospitals would prefer to hire new grads into their new grad programs. Their exposure to theory and practice is fresh. They are still in "learning mode." No offense meant but four years is a long way away from the bedside, especially if you had very limited bedside experience.

    I really think a refresher course is the way to go if you want to get back into bedside nursing.
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    Oops, I meant to say I'm NOT a new grad...:spin: Didn't profread that one..(;

    In that case, would be good to look into a refresher course. They offer courses in Seattle for a pretty penny, but in my case, may be worth it. I would like to do more hands on care than I'm currenty doing. And, I'm actually tired of working 5 days a week, the shift work is sounding more appealing!
  7. 1
    Quote from GirloftheSun
    Oops, I meant to say I'm NOT a new grad...:spin: Didn't profread that one..(;

    In that case, would be good to look into a refresher course. They offer courses in Seattle for a pretty penny, but in my case, may be worth it. I would like to do more hands on care than I'm currenty doing. And, I'm actually tired of working 5 days a week, the shift work is sounding more appealing!
    LOL---sorry!

    I really do think a refresher course is the way to go for you if you want to get back into floor nursing.

    Good luck to you, whatever path you choose!
    GirloftheSun likes this.
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    Granted I am no expert on the job situation in the islands, but I think you are "marketable" as is. You are a BSN and you have your OCN. Put together a resume, and send it out. Concentrate on hospitals associated w/UH Sch of Med. My hunch would be you might find an analogous position w/a researcher there.

    If you really want to try floor work again, find an oncology unit. Meet w/the NM to determine where you would fit in (assuming there's an opening), and what you would need for support.

    In your resume, don't forget to include any articles your doc published w/which you helped. IMHO, I think you should move forward in your career. Once you are established in HI (as in, qualified for residency), consider going for your MSN.
    GirloftheSun likes this.
  9. 0
    Thank you for your encouragement and suggestions. I do have authorship on 1 paper (not the first or last author, but at least I'm on!) and I will be on another paper that will be published in 2 years or so. I've also written an abstract and presented that at a conference. I would like to have more patient contact and also experience the life of a nurse working on the hospital floor. I think if I can incorporate that I'd be more well rounded as a nurse. It will be different going from days and holidays off to shift work and working nights, but, I am williing to give it up to try it again. I've been considering the masters route for quite some time. How about you, do you have an MSN?
  10. 0
    Quote from prmenrs
    Granted I am no expert on the job situation in the islands, but I think you are "marketable" as is. You are a BSN and you have your OCN. Put together a resume, and send it out. Concentrate on hospitals associated w/UH Sch of Med. My hunch would be you might find an analogous position w/a researcher there.

    If you really want to try floor work again, find an oncology unit. Meet w/the NM to determine where you would fit in (assuming there's an opening), and what you would need for support.

    In your resume, don't forget to include any articles your doc published w/which you helped. IMHO, I think you should move forward in your career. Once you are established in HI (as in, qualified for residency), consider going for your MSN.
    Honestly, PRM, I think a refresher course should be her first step towards returning to floor nursing. I really can't see a NM hiring someone who has not had direct patient contact for four years (and only new grad experience at that) for a floor position. She'll basically be starting from ground zero as far as bedside skills are concerned. That's an awful lot for a NM to take on, regardless of the credentials and enthusiasm of the candidate. A research position is a totally different issue---I think she'll be able to find a position in that field quite easily.

    And PRM, as an experienced nurse, I think you know the dynamics of floors/units when they are already often short-staffed and expected to train and pick up the slack of someone who they perceive is incapable of pulling their own weight. I hate to bring this up, actually, but it may be a bit of a rude reality check if she is put in that situation. Not fair to anyone, including the poster. She already has had bad experiences with floor nursing. I would hate to see her have another one after going back to the floor. Oncology units are heavy---lots of stuff going on. The realities of cancer and chemo side effects can often be very intense. I think a refresher course will at least give her the confidence that she is able to perform the basic functions of a floor nurse.

    All the big five hospitals are affiliated with UH. Queens would be the one most likely to have a suitable opening.

    I agree that oncology would be the best area especially since she has her OCN. Her knowledge of theory would definitely be an asset. Queens has openings in both their inpatient and outpatient oncology units. Note that there are some practical requirements for both areas.

    http://www.queens.org/jobs.html
    Last edit by WindwardOahuRN on Jul 4, '07
  11. 0
    I absolutely respect your opinion, Windward. A refresher course would'nt hurt, that's for sure. I'd have to take one, too, if I ever wanted to take care of an adult again. Fortunately for the adults, I don't!

    I admire the OP for wanting to be a well-rounded nurse, I just wanted to point out that she has some options, given the experience she does have.

    In any case, best wishes!!


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