new BSN grad considering the military

  1. I have a somewhat different background, so I hope somebody can help. I'll be graduating with a BSN this May 2007. This is a bachelor-to-bachelor program, meaning I don't have an ADN, and have never worked as a nurse before. I spent a couple years working as an EMT and an ICU tech though. Also, I have no military experience to speak of.

    So I've been thinking of joining the military, partly because I actually want to go overseas (Iraq specifically). From most of the threads I've read through, it seems like most people are hesitant about joining because they DON'T want to be deployed... I'm on the other side I guess. I've actually spent some time in Afghanistan and Tajikistan, so I kind of know what it's like, although Tajik life was a world of difference from Afghanistan.

    Anyway, with no actual nursing or military experience, I was wondering what kind of timeline I can expect if I join the military now. From the application process to actually being deployed. Any information (even non-nursing related) is welcome.
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   Gennaver
    Quote from FuSoYa
    I have a somewhat different background, so I hope somebody can help. I'll be graduating with a BSN this May 2007.
    ...
    Anyway, with no actual nursing or military experience, I was wondering what kind of timeline I can expect if I join the military now. From the application process to actually being deployed. Any information (even non-nursing related) is welcome.
    Hello,
    Actually your background really isn't somewhat different. Many people start their Nursing career with a BSN, that is the recommended level of entry to practice endorsed by the AACN since 1965. Possibly it is a regional thing that makes you feel different.

    In reality, you will be welcomed into Nursing with a BSN equally as ADN and preferentially in the Military service, (over ADN).

    In regards to your desire to deploy, you are also not alone in your willingness to serve. It has been described jokingly to me as "deployment envy", (I have a case of it as a fellow former EMT am also anxious to "serve").

    The way it was explained to me, here, by a nurse posting from Ibn Sina in Balad, we will most likely do our new nurse bedside experience for a minimum of six months, (yet, the needs of the Army take precedence and that isn't a gaurantee). He/She suggested that when I sign my contract to let my recruiter know that if possible that I want to be assigned to a base that will be upcoming on the roster for deployment.

    Welcome to the forum.

    For what it is worth, my timeline from application to being picked up by the Army review board was nearly six months. However, I am 40 and have had many former jobs and former addresses and student loans to list and in a MS to Nursing entry program and needed a waiver for my age and tattoos, so, maybe that is why so long? OH! I was also applying around Sept/OCT and I think that is the end of the fiscal year for recruiting.

    Good luck,
    Gen
  4. by   FuSoYa
    thanks for the help Gen. yea, i've been thinking of just meeting with a recruiter, but i'd be hesitant to believe everything they say.
  5. by   Gennaver
    Quote from FuSoYa
    thanks for the help Gen. yea, i've been thinking of just meeting with a recruiter, but i'd be hesitant to believe everything they say.

    Hello,
    I suggest again to make sure that your recruiter is a medical recruiter. While it is wise to be cautious against "selective hearing" I would say that my own experience included being self-informed and double checking things that didn't seem one hundred percent right.

    I read around the about military site's hyperlink, "what the recruiter never told you" and "what to expect" and so on. It helped.

    While the deceptive recruiters seem so notorious I do not think that the general recruiter out there is out to deceive.

    Just speaking to one and asking questions is the start. When it comes down to arranging meps or signing your contract remember that the onus for honesty and responsibility is upon you. If you lie at meps that is your integrity, if your recruiter says to avoid mentioning some health history, do not listen to him. It is the recruiter's job to file for waivers and if you need one then the odds are you may get one yet, if you are dishonest, odds are you are hurting yourself.

    If there is something that you want to arrange, such as duty base or bonus or anything like that, then it must be listed in your contract at signing.

    I would go ahead and call and ask a recruiter. If he/she tells you something that you are not sure of, call them on it and kindly ask for "proof". Nothing wrong in that.

    My recruiter had to work his rump off for me, thankfully he did. I still managed to call him with my own questions and doubts and non-blame asked for "proof" all the time.

    Gen
    p.s. oh, and he still did indeed say things where I could wishfully misinterpret, but, I corrected him, he still suggested I not mention things at meps, but I knew better and mentioned them at meps, (they did not even require a waiver! such as my recent mumps, my adult chicken pox and an abnormal pap which resolved on its own-just spoke with the physician at meps and he okayed them).

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