Navy Nurse Hopeful, Feedback PLEASE!

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    First time posting, although I have read many topics here Anway, I will try to summarize.

    I am a senior in a BSN program. I will graduate May 2012. GPA 3.9, lots of leadership experience, active duty navy wife. I am trying desperately to commission into the Navy Nurse Corps.

    I have completed all of my paperwork, MEPS physical, and one interview. I have another interview this week. My recruiter always seems busy, and information she gives me can be inconsistent sometimes. She told me that there is still a possibilty to apply for the NCP for 2012 as an alternate, since I have over 6 months until graduation. She also said that if it gets kicked back, I can apply direct accession.

    From looking around, it does not seem like either of these options is plausible. I really am unaware of the process after I submit my final application, so I am hoping someone might shed some light and clear things up.

    1) what is the process after submitting your application? I have seen people mention being "professionally reccommended." How does that work? Are their instances where people DO not get professionally reccommended? If so, is it game over at that point?
    2) Also, for direct accession... if I am not selected, am I able to keep reapplying? Fortunately with my husband in the navy, I do not need to rush into another job if I can't get a commission right away. We are stable right now. I just want to verify that as long as I am able to wait, I can eventually become accepted.

    My interview today went great, the CDR told me that she can tell I am an excellent candidate. I have been applying for 6 months now. It is stressful but I am really hoping to get some answers and figure out where things actually stand, since it seems so hard to find consistent information.

    Thank you!
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  4. 10 Comments so far...

  5. 1
    1) what is the process after submitting your application? I have seen people mention being "professionally reccommended." How does that work?

    I recently transferred from Reserve medical officer recruiting. Being Reserves is slightly different from Active, I can let you know a little. "Professionally recommended", often referred to as "PRO-REC" means that the board liked you and would like for you to become a commissioned officer in the Navy. They can only PRO-REC because Congress makes the ultimate decision. With Medical applicants, since you have to get all of your medical out of the way first, if you are PRO-REC from the board, you have near a 100% chance of commission. The only way you will not get a commission is if something changes in your professional, civil, or medical/physical status.

    Are their instances where people DO not get professionally recommended? If so, is it game over at that point?

    Not getting PRO-REC doesn't mean that the game is over. It just means that it is over for that board. Usually we will not resubmit an applicant unless something changes in billets available or you professionally (Master's or specialty). I know on the Reserve side, you would not get selected if you had any hick-up in your professional career (license or career non-license impact). It is good that you are starting early.

    2) Also, for direct accession... if I am not selected, am I able to keep reapplying? Yes. See above answer.

    With the economy the way it is, the available billets fill VERY FAST. The Officer recruiter you are working with can not submit your package until you have your BSN. Since you will not have your BSN until May, the billets available for FY-12 will likely be filled already. It is best to keep in constant contact with your recruiter when it gets close to you graduating. If positions/billets are available, submit then. I believe, this past year (FY-11), billets were full by late February. If FY-12 repeats the pattern, then come October 2012, submit your officer application for Direct Assess. You said that you are in no rush, so it might be a while, just be patient. Fortunately, your physical is good for two years. Unfortunately, your interviews are only good for six months. This is not too much of an issue because we (recruiters) will contact the interviewer and have them just change the date on the interview form. This same goes true with all employers and basically the majority of the application paperwork.

    The above is information for DA. I am unsure of the application requirements for student programs but you might find the following websites informational. They are the Program Authorizations (PAs) and explain the requirements to be eligible for a commission in the respective program.

    DA and Reserve:
    http://www.cnrc.navy.mil/publication...20Mar%2007.pdf

    NCP:
    http://www.cnrc.navy.mil/publication...116C_Mar07.pdf

    Hope that helps a little. Your recruiter will not be full of too much information until around October 15th of this year on what is happening for this (fiscal)year for that is about the time the information on available billets is provided to her.
    LotusRN1972 likes this.
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    Hello Guys, I thought about joining the Navy nurse Reserves. I live in steps away from the Naval Hopsital on Camp Pendleton (marines base) and one in San Diego. I was told by my recruiter that I need to work at least 3-4 months in a specialty. I am a new grad and it is HARD, to say the least, to get a feet into a hospital without a year or 2 of experience. I am slated to volunteer as a RN on the Med/Surg floor but that is all. Can you give me some pointers? It is hard enough being a new grad (BSN) and NO JOBS will hire me... Thanks...
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    It is in your best interest to have that career established before submitting for a lot of different reasons. It is not necessarily a requirement to have one right out of school to submit but it does GREATLY increase your chances of selection if you do have that career established.

    I did have a long detailed explanation as to why it is in your best interest to do so, but my computer locked up and I had to reset and do not desire to get too involved again. I can later if you request more details.

    If 1972 is your birth year, you need to submit SOON! You need to be commissioned before you turn 40.

    Good luck on finding you a nursing career.
    LotusRN1972 likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from Navymm1swaw
    It is in your best interest to have that career established before submitting for a lot of different reasons. It is not necessarily a requirement to have one right out of school to submit but it does GREATLY increase your chances of selection if you do have that career established.

    I did have a long detailed explanation as to why it is in your best interest to do so, but my computer locked up and I had to reset and do not desire to get too involved again. I can later if you request more details.

    If 1972 is your birth year, you need to submit SOON! You need to be commissioned before you turn 40.

    Good luck on finding you a nursing career.
    Thank you for your words of advice!!! Any is better than a tiny bit!!! Thank you for the time to answer ANY question I will continue my search for employment...

    LotusRN 1972
  9. 2
    Sorry on taking so long to get back to this site. I had schooling stuff to finish. To get more detailed...

    It is best to have a career set up because:

    1) It is required to be "currently engaged in a nursing practice". It doesn't specify on being full time employed or volunteering. It will be up to BUMED. Your recruiter will know who to contact to ask about you situation. It is also required, for Reserve applicants, to "have three months of work experience" following the obtainment of your BSN. Instruction for both Active and Reserve components can be found at: http://www.cnrc.navy.mil/publication...20Mar%2007.pdf This instruction gives application requirements and obligation/commitment time for each component.

    2) If you join the Reserves now, if selected, you will be put in as a professional nurse (basically "undesignated"). This is hurtful or not in you best interest because there is not any specialty that you qualify for. You CAN get a commission right after you get your BSN, but it is a far less chance of getting selected for a commission. Right now, with a career and experience as little as 3-4 months, you have a near 100% chance of getting selected.

    3) Being commissioned as a "professional nurse" might not come with any special pays. you said that you are slated to volunteer in Med/Surg. With that experience, you could qualify for upwards to $30,000 sign-on "special pay". The new instruction covering the special pay amounts should be out shortly.

    4) You will need a full time or a high hour part-time employment to meet a certain amount of hours required by the Navy to retain your Credentials (CCPD).

    5) Speaking of the CCPD (our credentialing check), they will need inputs from peers and supervisors of employers. You will need to have someone to write these recommending you and answering questions about your ethics, license info, etc.

    6) When you get into a specialty in your civilian career, the Navy will put you in a specialty that complements your civilian nursing specialty. This helps you, your employer and the Navy. If you do come in without a specialty and then get into a specialty in your civilian career later, it is a process to get you specialized after you are already in. It is much easier on you if you already have the specialty before coming in. The Navy doesn't train you for a specialty right off. The Navy can send you to further education, but it is USUALLY after three years of service. It can happen before three, but is rare.
    Basically, there is a lot of work that goes into applying for a commission on both your part and the recruiters part. As stated before, having the small amount of experience will make the time spent (approx one to two months) applying be less likely to have been time wasted because with that experience, pending no other issues, you have a near 100% chance of selection. Without any experience and being currently unemployed, it is near a zero percent chance.

    So, I hope that explains a little on why it is in your best interest to have the career first. This is for the Reserves only. If you are looking for full time employment, I strongly- I repeat, STRONGLY encourage you to speak with an Active duty recruiter. It is not for everybody, but speaking with one will provide you with information. It is not like you speak with one and you are in the Navy the next day. It is about the same amount of time and there is no rush. I would talk with one soon though. So many people are coming in due to them being in the same situation as you, not employed, the billets fill very quickly (sometimes before Christmas but usually by the end of February).

    Good luck.
    navynursehopeful and LotusRN1972 like this.
  10. 1
    Since you are so close to the hospital, have your recruiter take you over there and speak with some Active duty nurses to see how they like or dislike serving on Active duty. My applicant have found the diversity of information to be very helpful in there decisions.
    LotusRN1972 likes this.
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    @Navymm1swaw!!!! YOU ROCK!!!
    Thank you from the bottom of my tiny heart for all of the information that you gave me and the rest of us looking to join!!! Joining is challanging, yet I have been through much worst situations; I have the patients to gain that experience; such a short period of time. I currently work at a home healthcare place and I have an appointment for a hospice RN. How that is incorperated into Med/Surg.. really can't say. I will volunteer until my wings fall off. Thanks again!!!

    LotusRN1972
  12. 1
    You are very welcome.

    Reading back, I noticed numerous spelling and grammatical errors in my posts yesterday. I apologize for that. I was not at 100% when posting. I was very tired (long boring day at school).
    LotusRN1972 likes this.
  13. 0
    Quote from Navymm1swaw
    You are very welcome.

    Reading back, I noticed numerous spelling and grammatical errors in my posts yesterday. I apologize for that. I was not at 100% when posting. I was very tired (long boring day at school).
    Any suggestions on a career that transmits to a job as a navy nurse? It is very difficult top find an in-hospital job as a new grad...


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