Why did you choose your nursing school? - page 2

by fbrlauren 2,106 Views | 15 Comments

I know that it's a good idea to look into NCLEX pass rates to see how well a nursing program prepares their students, but what other factors influenced you in choosing the school that you decided to attend and in choosing which... Read More


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    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    Smiling at the notion of a 19-year-old nursing hopeful lecturing someone 30 years their senior with more time in nursing than you had in high school.

    Note that I didn't say that those things are trivial; simply that they're fully attainable outside of the university experience while the academics are not.

    If you care not for my opinions in response to your question, I will happily keep them to myself.

    Good luck to you.
    I apologize if I made you feel like I was undermining your experience! Of course I value your opinion, as this is why I'm asking those who are currently in/already completed nursing school for advice. However, if I disagree with you because I don't fully understand what you meant, or if I'm just completely wrong, please feel free to clarify. I really was not trying to personally attack you as a nurse--This is why I was careful not to use "you" as a pronoun. But I do see how it might have come off that way, and I'm sorry for that! I was just speaking hypothetically--knowing that nurses do need to able to provide comfort, and knowing what I know about myself.

    Here's an example: I currently have a 4.0 in my nursing pre-requisites so it appears that nursing may be a good career choice. Although I am confident in my study habits and the ability to learn and retain the academic knowledge that I will need to pass the NCLEX when the time comes, I am worried that I still won't be a great nurse just because I have always been a little shy. ***This is why I said earlier that good grades don't always make the best/comforting nurses.

    I agree with you when you say personal growth can be attained outside of the university. And I know that the learning, both academically and personally, does not stop at graduation. But aren't some of these qualities important to already have when getting my first job as a nurse? I feel like I have the
    very basic qualities to be a good nurse--empathy, patience, attention to detail, etc--so I think I'm fully capable to become the nurse I want to be some day and I think I've chosen a good career match. But I feel I may be lacking in the communication/interpersonal skills department. And personally, this is something that I feel I could work on best when I'm forced out of my comfort zone (away from home), as everyone learns differently. My school of preference would also allow me to be exposed to a much larger demographic. Learning how to communicate with a diverse group of people, I'm sure, is also very important.

    Again, your opinions are very welcome and feel free to correct me if I'm wrong!
    Last edit by fbrlauren on Mar 7, '13
  2. 0
    Quote from SuperHelper
    I firmly disagree with the "get a degree in anything" approach. Because of funding, many schools are either denying entry to 2nd-degree students altogether or charging them exorbitant per-unit fees. Additionally, a "degree in anything" is not likely to yield the academic success that one needs to be competitive in many fields.
    If this is in response to my comment, this is what I would tell MYSELF at 19. I was still very much unfocused and didn't have a career plan or goal, even though I was a very good student (still am unfortunately). If at 19 I knew without a doubt I wanted to be a nurse, then of course I would have tried to get a BSN, or majored in some sort of biological science for my bachelors. Because there are a lot of young 20-somethings with much better job prospects than me for no other reason than they got a bachelors in anything versus my associates degree and work experience.
    Mine was in response to yours and is also what I'd have told myself way back when. I'd have suggested joining the Coast Guard or Air Force (rather than the Marine Corps which I did) and seek training in fields which might interest me and then initiate self-study until I was ready to commit myself to university education in my chosen field.

    Rather than earn a "degree in anything," I'd seek out trade skills, art skills, or even just get a job waiting tables and getting involved with Big Brothers/Sisters, scouting, Red Cross, whatever else it was that caught my fancy... learn to fly, learn to dive... learn to program, master Excel or VB or HTML, study Spanish, move to Mexico, whatever... just leave university until you're ready to dive in and power to the front.

    Higher education is not to be trifled with, IMO.
  3. 0
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥

    Mine was in response to yours and is also what I'd have told myself way back when. I'd have suggested joining the Coast Guard or Air Force (rather than the Marine Corps which I did) and seek training in fields which might interest me and then initiate self-study until I was ready to commit myself to university education in my chosen field.

    Rather than earn a "degree in anything," I'd seek out trade skills, art skills, or even just get a job waiting tables and getting involved with Big Brothers/Sisters, scouting, Red Cross, whatever else it was that caught my fancy... learn to fly, learn to dive... learn to program, master Excel or VB or HTML, study Spanish, move to Mexico, whatever... just leave university until you're ready to dive in and power to the front.

    Higher education is not to be trifled with, IMO.
    I agree with your response! I am 20 and went to college right away high school. I have seen countless friends who also graduated and went straight to college, only to fail/party their way out just because they didn't know what they wanted to do school wise. Now all they have are empty bank accounts or hefty school loans & some very bad GPAs on their college transcripts.
  4. 0
    I picked my nursing school based on a few things:

    1. It has a great reputation and a high board pass rate.
    2. It is a great location. 5 miles from my hast and all the clinical locations are within 15 miles.
    3. It is a part time program. We have classes in the evening and clinically are in the evening or on the weekends. It is 2 semesters longer than the traditional 5 but it is what works for me. This way, I can keep my job in the operating room that I love while furthering my career.
  5. 1
    I think it's completely fair and realistic to want to enjoy the college experience. If school is all you are committed to, you should have time for some extracurricular, campus activities, no problem. I also understanding wanting to go away from home, get out on your own a little and try new things. In nursing school, you just have to make sure that you put school above all those things and only enjoy them when there's time.
    KelRN215 likes this.
  6. 0
    The school I picked fit me for a variety of reasons including, cost, location, academic requirements and program specifics. There were other programs that fit in some or most of those criteria, but the one I chose had the most going for it as far what I needed.


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