Odd situation and how to handle it in the future - page 2

Hi everyone! I have an experience I want to share with you in hopes of getting some feedback. Firstly, this is not something that happened recently, it's something that happened last year. ... Read More

  1. by   MB37
    I've been a bartender for many years, and yes, vodka is the drink of choice for those who don't want others to know they've been drinking. However, usually you can still smell something. I've never heard of grape bubble gum being used to cover it, but it sounds like it would work. Do you think she's consuming at the hospital, or still drunk from the night before? ("still drunk" isn't better, it's just harder to catch in the act) I also drink, and enjoy it, but not the night before clinical. Any serious drinker can easily consume enough the night before to still be legally drunk the next morning and possible not even notice. It's a hard situation - you have no "proof" that she's been drinking unless youve seen it, so it's hard to get too involved - especially as a student. I think you definitely need to find out for sure what the school's policy is, from someone besides this particular instructor. If the school really places all the responsibility on the NM, you might want to print out a copy of that policy and put it in her mailbox, if you aren't comfortable talking to her in person. I couldnt' imagine my school tolerating the inappropriate behavior you described without some kind of reprimand, for a sober student! We're always told how we're supposed to be representing the school and to look and act professional at all times on hospital property. Good luck with whatever you do, and hopefully she can find help soon, for her and her baby's sake!
  2. by   DaFreak71
    Quote from MB37
    I've been a bartender for many years, and yes, vodka is the drink of choice for those who don't want others to know they've been drinking. However, usually you can still smell something. I've never heard of grape bubble gum being used to cover it, but it sounds like it would work. Do you think she's consuming at the hospital, or still drunk from the night before? ("still drunk" isn't better, it's just harder to catch in the act) I also drink, and enjoy it, but not the night before clinical. Any serious drinker can easily consume enough the night before to still be legally drunk the next morning and possible not even notice. It's a hard situation - you have no "proof" that she's been drinking unless youve seen it, so it's hard to get too involved - especially as a student.
    I don't believe she has ever consumed alcohol at the hospital or even at school for that matter. It was a matter of still being drunk from the night before (which she did admit to me and the other student who reported it as well). We were a "team", best friends, so I was privy to the "drama" in her life, more so than just a classmate. I spent the whole first year of our friendship trying to get her help because she would often express to me that she was afraid she was an alcoholic. I took her to the school counselor and a short while after that I took her to the doctor to be put on antabuse (her idea). Sadly, she's been a heavy alcoholic for years, starting when she was 14 or 15. I am glad that she went into rehab, but sad that nothing has changed. For my own protection (emotionally) I have cut ties with her. It was a hard choice to make, but I can't invest my time with people who aren't interested in improving themselves. The constant drama was too draining for me. It was interfering with my studies and like they say, you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make them drink. (no pun intended, lol).

    You are spot on when you said that unless I have proof I shouldn't assume she was drunk. The fact that she admitted it (later) and the fact that I knew her intimately led me to be privy to her "normal" behavior versus her drunk behavior. Due to all the time we spent together outside of class, I know how she looks and acts when she's been drinking versus when she is sober. All I could do was go off what I knew to be true and report it. Friend or no, I had a responsibility to report her because if something had happened to a patient (given the wrong med, etc) I would feel just as responsible and I surely don't want or need that on my conscious.

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