Now I know why nobody ever gets a 4.0 at my school ... - page 4

by bonjournurse2b

3,306 Views | 36 Comments

I was looking through a syllabus for one of my classes (worth 900 points total). This is the grading scale A = 899.07-900 points A- = 810-899.06 points B+ = 787.5-809.99 points B = 742.5-787.49 points .. I'm not even... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from psu_213
    It is interesting that you use the word "contract." When I was in nursing school, at the end of every syllabus was the sentence "This syllabus is not a contract between the school and the student. It is merely meant as a guide for the student." I always found that statement curious and, well, not being a lawyer, I'm not sure what the implications of such a statement would be in a legal proceeding, if indeed there were a major change in a policy from what was presented in the syllabus (say a change in grading scale, change in attendance policy, etc.). If it is not recognized as a contract by the course, I would think it means a lack of recourse (in a legal sense anyway) for an affected student.
    I would take that to mean that school and teacher policies could change (legally) during the semester and the syllabus may not be a binding document throughout the semester in that case. For example, if the professor changed dates for exams or moved around the order of content being taught as presented on the syllabus, that would not be a big deal, but it would not be in line with what was on the syllabus. Additionally, usually colleges vote on major changes between terms, but if something pertaining to policy (grading, attendance, etc.) was changed mid-semester, that would be void on the syllabus. Having worked in public schools, one thing over the last few years we had to add to our syllabi and other published documents was an equal opportunity and non-discriminatory statement. I am sure this is something similar.
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    I've been to a lot of colleges. I teach at one (not nursing). It is Atypical for a syllabus NOT to be treated like a contract. Violations of the syllabus are typically what is required for a successful grade appeal ("unfairness" is rarely successful). Where I teach, we treat them like a contract along with the student policy manual and faculty policy manual. Usually a syllabus has a line saying in effect "schedule subject to change."
    Last edit by SummitRN on May 10, '13
  3. 1
    The criteria for an A is ridiculous, and will only hurt those applying to graduate school.
    SopranoKris likes this.
  4. 0
    Yes, I agree...90% is the minimum error that should be acceptable for med dosaging. I always think "hmmm, don't want to kill 10% of my patients, so I'd better be 100% sure of my math!!!"

    However, OP's issue was that to get a 4.0 in her program, the grading scale for an A was 899.3 to 900. That's less than a point deduction to get a 4.0. Less than 899.3 is a 3.5. I do think that it's a ridiculous grading scale. It's setting up good students to fail to achieve an A. It will also lower your GPA to get the 3.5, which can have an impact on getting in to a graduate program down the road.

    I took Pharm last semester and I aced my med math and was able to pull off a 95% in Pharm lecture, so ended up with an overall 4.0 for the class. No rounding, no extra credit, no make-up assignments, etc. I worked my tail off to earn that grade.

    I think having a grading scale that's next to impossible to earn a 4.0 means that you can't really compare students from one Pharm course at a particular school to another. It's comparing apples to oranges, so to speak. I also think it demoralizes students. No, I don't think everyone should get extra credit and spoon-fed information so we all get an A. But for students who work hard and put in the effort, I think grading scales should be somewhat consistent. Setting an impossibly high bar of less than 1 point for an A isn't very fair. It's like telling the students up front "you'll never get an A in this course".
  5. 0
    Stuff like that is also why students should also keep their syllabus. Should there be any question about a grade, they can show what the grading policy was during the course.
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    FYI guys, I ended up with a B in the class. I know this is an off-topic question ... but this was my second time taking the class. I definitely have plans to go to grad school. I always assumed that they want to see A's if you retake a class. Is this going to look bad for me?

    Relating back to the topic though, my friend ended up with a 95% overall and received an A-. What the heck? A 95 is EXCEPTIONAL! I feel for her :\
  7. 0
    Quote from bonjournurse
    FYI guys, I ended up with a B in the class. I know this is an off-topic question ... but this was my second time taking the class. I definitely have plans to go to grad school. I always assumed that they want to see A's if you retake a class. Is this going to look bad for me?

    Relating back to the topic though, my friend ended up with a 95% overall and received an A-. What the heck? A 95 is EXCEPTIONAL! I feel for her :\
    I think graduate schools are going to look at the body of work, moreso than the grade in one class. If you have a good overall GPA, in my mind, one less than perfect grade should not hurt you too much.

    Take this with a grain of salt though...this was just personal opinion, and I really don't know for what individual school/admissions officer is looking.


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