ASN (ADN) or BSN

  1. I have been told that some students in my state are waiting at least 1 year to get in the BSN program. I have good grades and am not really worried about getting in but I don't really want to wait. On the other hand, the associates degree at the community college is a first come, first in type of thing. They have a week which they take apps and with about 5 cc's participating (one app and you rank your choices) I have not known anyone who has at least a C in all prereqs and 50% on the net not getting in. The state university also has a RN-BSN program that is pretty easy to get in according to the rumor mill.

    I am really leaning towards the cc as I will have all of the prereqs done in the fall (except A&P 2 which I will do in the Spring) and will be able to start in next Summer. If I go the uni route I will have another semester on top of that and won't be able to start until Spring 2006.

    Anyone
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  2. Poll: Are you doing a ASN(ADN), BSN or LPN

    • ASN/ADN

      50.00% 32
    • BSN

      45.31% 29
    • LPN

      4.69% 3
    64 Votes
  3. 26 Comments

  4. by   Soonstudent
    I'm in the same situation. I choose to go to the cc first, then work while I finish up my BSN. Any feedback from anyone else who has done this would be appreciated. I think I'd like to be a CRNA one day. Does anyone think I'll be at a disadvantage going this route rather than a traditional BSN?

    Thanks Brandon
  5. by   IMustBeCrazy
    I had to smile when you said it was 'easier to get into the ADN program', since in my area this is not the case. Not only do you need to prove proficiency in prior coursework (mainly Science and Math-related courses) but then you need to take and pass the NLN. This weeds out another 50%. After that, add to the mix a jumble of other prerequisites and THEN you get the opportunity to get put on the *waiting list* (woo woo), which is currently 2-3 years long. Now I'm in the program, and I'm jumping right into the nuts and bolts of nursing, with none of the 'fluff' classes like phy ed, etc. to pull up my GPA.

    Even though there is a wait for the ADN program, I prefer it hands down over a traditional 4 year college. Been there, done that, got the diploma. No interest in doing it again.
  6. by   Soonstudent
    Luckily there's not much of a wait for most ADN programs in sc. I was reading a post earlier about California, and it was going to take the person 5 YEARS to complete an ADN. WOW. For once I like good ole SC. lol
  7. by   ayndim
    Quote from Soonstudent
    Luckily there's not much of a wait for most ADN programs in sc. I was reading a post earlier about California, and it was going to take the person 5 YEARS to complete an ADN. WOW. For once I like good ole SC. lol
    I read that too and I couldn't believe it. Here in AZ it is about 1 year or maybe 1 1/2 years for prereqs and then 4 semesters for the ADN. You can also go in the summer and you are done in 16 months after prereqs. I had alot of my prereqs but it will take me 2 more semesters because of A&P.

    Here is what we had to take.

    Eng 101 (102 is part of the ADN program but I already have it, thankfully)
    1 Humanaties class (have)
    A&P 1 & 2 (need)
    Basic Chem (taking now)
    1 Health care class (covers ethics and such)
    Med. Term. (start in summer)
    College Algebra (have it)
    Nurse Assist class (spring)
    Psych 101 (have)
    Microbiology (fall)

    As you can see I am almost ready to start the adn program. The only thing holding me back from next spring is A&P 2.

    Nutrition and pathopys. are part of the ADN program. I have the stats for the bsn but it will take a couple of years to get into a bsn program. Plus you have to do nutrition, pathpys. and a family studies class first. Meanwhile I could already be working and get my employer to pay for the rn to bsn. They also have a rn to ms.

    How many more prereqs do you have to do.
  8. by   orrnlori
    Quote from Soonstudent
    I'm in the same situation. I choose to go to the cc first, then work while I finish up my BSN. Any feedback from anyone else who has done this would be appreciated. I think I'd like to be a CRNA one day. Does anyone think I'll be at a disadvantage going this route rather than a traditional BSN?

    Thanks Brandon
    It will not hinder you to get your ADN then BSN when it comes to applying for CRNA school. Get your ADN, get thee into an ICU, finish your BSN, apply directly to CRNA school. With good grades AND ICU experience of 2 years or so, you'll have a much better chance than the BSN with 1 year ICU experience. Good luck!!!!!
  9. by   mariessas_mom
    Here is my personal experience. I was going to get my ADN at a CC, but it was actually more competitive to get in because they only accept 60 in the fall only, where the University I transferred in takes 150 in Spring and Fall. Plus, if you are a couple of classes short (like I was) you have only those classes to take while waiting for the next fall start. I just couldn't see busting my butt off to get into an ADN program when I could get into a BSN program just as easy. I also compared the length of time, only 1 year longer to get my BSN. And yes, I have some friends who are 1 year ahead of me because they went to cc, but I will be coming out with a better degree. And what is a year, nothing really. At my age, the years are just flying by.

    But, if I would have done ADN and bridged to BSN later down the road, the total time would be 5-6 years (a year or 2 longer). So, I am actually saving time. What really pushed me into it was when I came to an open house at my university and sat in on a nursing info session and about 60% of the women there were ADN's trying to come back and get their BSN because they had hit a wall in advancement. Of course, that is just the right decision for me and has a lot to do with the opportunities in my area. Good luck in any decision you make, it will be the right one for you.
  10. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from mariessas_mom
    ... I was going to get my ADN at a CC, but it was actually more competitive to get in because they only accept 60 in the fall only, where the University I transferred in takes 150 in Spring and Fall...
    Fairly typical situation.

    Usually easier to get into BSN program.
  11. by   Soonstudent
    I'd love to go BSN first, I just can't afford to be out of work that long.

    Sorry Ayndim, I didn't mean to take over your thread. Brandon
  12. by   ayndim
    Quote from Soonstudent
    I'd love to go BSN first, I just can't afford to be out of work that long.

    Sorry Ayndim, I didn't mean to take over your thread. Brandon

    No problem. I don't think you will have a problem getting into a CRNA school if you go through one of the RN to BSN programs. At my state university they offer a 24 month RN to BSN to MS program. The RN to BSN program is once a week for 12 months. I figure once I am working I can get my employer to pay for it. Since I don't qualify for anything but loans I think I am going with the CC as I will be able to pay for that out of pocket. If I don't get picked by their lottery system I will go ahead and finish the rest of my prereqs for a BSN and apply to both the next semester.

    Good Luck.
  13. by   tdg_rn
    Call me biased - after all it's what I'm doing - but I don't see any problem with going through an ADN program first. I think practically it works out better to be able to get out and get the experience while continuing your education.

    I look at it this way. As a nursing student (two year or four year) you are ONLY a STUDENT until you finish but as a Nurse who is also a student you are a NURSE. This means you have the ability to shop around among programs AND employers (some of whom may be more generous toward helping you reach your goal) while completing your education. The sooner you start practicing the sooner you broaden your options.

    Something to think about, eh?

    Terence
  14. by   Mr_D
    In Atlanta metro area, those wanting a BSN either need a 3.5 GPA or a lot of patience. There are 2 public schools that offer an accellerated BSN, one private school that offers a "BSN for Second Degree students". The traditional BSN programs take 3 years, regardless of prior coursework/degree, which is ridiculous.

    One of the most maddening things about the application process is most schools don't give you a good reason for your denial. I hear such frustration about that, like "Should I bother to reapply? Was I close?". One University BSN program advertises their minimum GPA is 2.8. It's a crock. The true minimum is about 3.5, and they made $$ off application fees. Thing is, people who don't have a prayer of getting in are rearranging their lives. There is a sub-culture now at the the community college where we all share our experiences and frustrations trying to get into Nursing School. We're starting to post our rejection/waiting list letters in the anatomy lab!

    Had I known what I know now, I would not have even applied to nursing school (therefore kept my job) until I had finished ALL my prereqs. By that, I mean prereqs are done by the application due date. That's another misnomer on nursing applications. They state you must finish all prereqs before the start of class. They should tell you that your application isn't even competitive until you have finished the prereqs.

    I make mostly 'A's now that I'm older, however my lifetime GPA of 3.1 may not be competitive anywhere around here. I got an offer from an ASN program: 800 applicants for approximately 90 slots -- I jumped on it. I decided not to roll the dice for a BSN program Spring Semester, had too much to lose. I figure it will take another year or so to complete RN -> BSN sometime down the road. In the meantime -- it's so hard getting in that I'm not picky about where the opportunity comes from!

    Mr_D
  15. by   mariessas_mom
    Quote from tdg_rn
    Call me biased - after all it's what I'm doing - but I don't see any problem with going through an ADN program first. I think practically it works out better to be able to get out and get the experience while continuing your education.

    I look at it this way. As a nursing student (two year or four year) you are ONLY a STUDENT until you finish but as a Nurse who is also a student you are a NURSE. This means you have the ability to shop around among programs AND employers (some of whom may be more generous toward helping you reach your goal) while completing your education. The sooner you start practicing the sooner you broaden your options.

    Something to think about, eh?

    Terence
    I agree with you Terence! The problem is, depending on where you live, the ADN programs are taking just as long! That is what I think is ridiculous. When I was considering ADN, the CC I was at kept adding prereqs. and making it so close to the BSN program that it seemed like a waste of time. But, BSN was the way for me to go but if I was in a different area I would have been fine doing an ADN program. It just pays to do your research and really compare the two before you decide.

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